American Forests

The objectives of American Forests, publisher of American Forests magazine, are to help people plant and care for trees for ecosystem restoration and healthier communities.

Articles from Vol. 98, No. 7-8, July-August

An Appalachian Original
Fifty yards below me, down a steep roadcut, trucks and cars hurried along the highway. I was hanging precariously from the limbs of a tree that itself was perched venturously on the steep slope. I began to seriously question my sanity, but then reassured...
Appalachian Innovator
When Kentucky native AL Fritsch moved back home--deep in a hollow in one of Appalachia's most depressed areas--the cleric/author/scientist began to visualize ways to help his neighbors. He settled on alternative technologies and set about making his...
A Solution to Mine Drainage?
When the U.S. Forest Service acquired land for the 607,000-acre Daniel Boone National Forest in Kentucky, a multitude of water-quality problems came with the deed. Located in the mineral-rich foothills of the Cumberland Mountains, much of the land...
Global ReLeaf Casts Historic Shadow on Moscow Peace Parade
There's a 10-foot sycamore struggling to recover from being transplanted to the lawn of the Russian White House in Moscow. That's not news, but how and why it got there makes an interesting story that illustrates how far afield American Forests and...
Haven in the Desert
The California desert seems an unlikely spot to find flourishing wetland habitat, but private landowners here in the northeastern corner of the state have found a way to bring water to the birds. B&B Wetlands lie on the east side of the Sierra...
Introducing Cool Communities
Judging by pop songs ranging from Cole Porter's "Too Darned Hot" to Lovin' Spoonful's "Hot Time (Summer in the City)," among others, it's clear that the high temperatures of our urban areas have caught the attention of more than just meteorologists....
New Life for the "River of Grass." (the Everglades, Florida) (Watershed Wars)
Not far west of the glittering skyscrapers that mark Miami's perch on the pastel edge of Biscayne Bay, one final traffic light launches the Tamiami Trail, U.S. 41, entry into a landscape that looks for all the world like an African savannah. The irony...
Salmon and Forests: Fog Brothers
The low foothills of the Olympic Mountains rise out of the river valleys like ridges on a rumpled carpet. In the deep recessions between trees, shades of green-- some close to black--blend with the brighter shades of the light-drenched upper limbs....
The California X-Disease
They knew 40 years ago that L.A.'s air was sickening the trees in the nearby hills. Since then, the engines of death have invaded even the wild High Sierra. They are my mountains, the San Gabriels, the mountains of my childhood. Rising like a great...
The Greening of the Corps
Recently the associate chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers introduced me to his staff as "the woman who crucified the Corps." Fortunately, he was smiling. He was referring to a book I wrote 10 years ago in which I took the Corps to task for...
The Lincoln-Log Syndrome
His feet planted solidly apart, knees bent slightly, the man brandishes the chainsaw like an assassin might wield an AK-47. Through oily, acrid smoke, sweat glistens on his bulging biceps and naked chest, and above the taut, fine line of his mouth,...
The Mazama Survivor
Lee Cheyne, a bulldozer operator for Oregon's Klamath County, was guiding his D-6 Cat 40 feet below ground level, cutting a new ditch for the county landfill in tiny Chemult (pop. 200), 70 miles north of Klamath Falls. He was working in easily moved...
Wetlands in Chaos
The old forester leaned back against a tree and scratched his chin. "When I was younger," he said reflectively, "we called them swamps. We didn't figure they were good for much of anything. I mean, some of them grow great trees, but what else do they...
Winning the Peace
I'm a child of the Cold War. My first brush with international matters was via a wall map of Europe with pins to show where my uncles Were fighting in World War II. Later it was Skywatch, a 24-hour vigil on the skies kept by the residents of our little...
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