American Forests

The objectives of American Forests, publisher of American Forests magazine, are to help people plant and care for trees for ecosystem restoration and healthier communities.

Articles from Vol. 97, No. 9-10, September-October

"Destructive Recreation" on Our Public Forests
During the spring of 1986, a survey crew marking boundaries for a national forest in Arizona realized something was wrong. They came upon a backhoe standing next to an ancient archaeological site, and several nearby trenches showed that the machine...
How Much Old-Growth Is Left?
In February 1991, the U.S. Forest Service and the Wilderness Society each released inventories and maps of the remaining old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest and northern California. These inventories were long-awaited because they promised...
Old-Growth Movers & Shakers
The stakes are high. The more information becomes available about old-growth ecosystems, species that live in old-growth, and possible ways of managing the forest, the higher the stakes get. The economy up the ante with every pitch and surge it takes....
Paying the Price for Old-Growth
"There's a heap o' hurt out here," scowls Len Hunter, who has spent much of the past 31 years planning timber sales on Washington's Olympic National Forest, just inland from the Pacific Coast. Some 72,000 of the forest's 112,000 acres have been clearcut...
Professor Practices What He Preaches
"I used to do esoteric research on chemical lasers," says Jack Parker, chemistry professor at Florida International University, a state school in Miami. But no more. Now Dr. Parker spends much of his time out of the lab-rallying students to plant trees...
Ruminations at the Woodpile
A few years ago, we installed a woodstove in our home, black cast iron with airtight doors and a catalytic burner to squeeze the last Btu out of a log. Our original purpose was to save money on gas bills, and we have, but in the process of cutting...
Suffering the Enviro-Doc
Dr. John J. Osborn sat across the table from George Leonard, the U.S. Forest Service's second-in-command. Leonard had flown to the Northwest on Forest Service business, and, hearing of the visit, Dr. Osborn had arranged to get together with Leonard...
The Bird of Contention
For nearly 20 years now, the northern spotted owl has been caught in a love-hate relationship. Environmentalists love this quiet forest bird; those involved in logging old-growth hate it. Back in the 1960s, when biologists first began studying the...
The Politics of Old-Growth
The old-growth issue surfaced in 1991 with an intensity far beyond that of 1990. This dismayed some who thought the issue could be resolved without congressional action. Others saw such action as inevitable. A number of factors heightened the sense...
The Tremble Tree
A number of years ago I carved my name into the bark of an aspen tree. A job that summer kept me up in the aspen of southwest Colorado, alone, for weeks at a time. Maybe I was prodded into the carving by the shepherds. It's not that I'd seen any sheep...
When the Bullwhacker Reigned Supreme
If you were to mention "old-growth"to a Pacific Northwest logger around the turn of the century, he might have assumed you were referring to the luxuriant mustache that was a hallmark of his trade-along with "tin pants" held up by galluses (suspenders...
Who Will Take the Lead on Old-Growth?
A friend whose judgment I respect once observed that by the time a difficult policy question has been clarified in Washington, the answer is already in place somewhere. Watching--and participating in--the anguish to seek a reasonable solution to the...
Will "New Forestry" Save Old Forests?
Today, almost two years after New Forestry began blooming in the public arena, its detractors and supporters agree about little except perhaps that the brainchild of Jerry Franklin and his colleagues was not intended to save old-growth forests. Thus...
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