American Forests

The objectives of American Forests, publisher of American Forests magazine, are to help people plant and care for trees for ecosystem restoration and healthier communities.

Articles from Vol. 98, No. 9-10, September-October

500 Years of American Wildlife
In 1492, a wildlife menagerie of the first order roamed across America. Bird flocks darkened the sun, rambling herds spread to the horizon, streams teemed with fish, and large predators culled the weak and young. It was, quite simply, one of the greatest...
Acworth: The Little City That Can
Acworth Georgia, population 5,000, lies less than an hour north of Atlanta near the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. Bordered on three sides by Lake Allatoona, with the smaller Lake Acworth traversing its center, "The Lake City," as Acworth...
Americans and Their Forests: A Love-Hate Story
Unless you are a rock, 500 years is a long time. It is a fairly long time for a forest, too; a half-millennium of natural processes would cause a significant degree of change in floral and faunal composition. Debates continue over whether people are...
Big White: The Pine That Built a Nation
Deep in New York's Adirondack Mountains, the Chubb River takes a wide turn and heads into a large open marsh. Here, a tall row of sturdy, wind-swept white pines clings to the last bit of high land. The trees tower above the surrounding country-some...
Cool Communities Announced in Oklahoma, Maryland
Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Frederick, Maryland, may not seem to have much in common, but they are teaming up with five other municipalities in an AMERICAN FORESTS pilot program to conserve energy and cool the urban "heat island." The Cool Communities...
Fighting Fire with New Ideas
The situation in the western forests this summer is critical. Virtually the entire states of Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, and California were rated as being in "extreme" drought conditions through June. Fire dangers are high,...
Gone Are the Groves Elysian
The forest met by the first colonists stretched from the barrier islands on which they landed 400 years ago--a hundred years after Columbus' triumph of persistence over sense-- to the prairies of the middle West. In the northern latitudes of what would...
How to Turn Kids Green
Programmed to the max and nurtured on Nintendo, today's kids never go outside! Here's how to turn |em on to the real world. Last January, 20 kids appeared at hearings before the U.S. Senate. They were worried about global warming, and asked that...
Mark of the Trespasser
There's a man in my country neighborhood who has perfected the economics of desolation. First he buys a hilly tract of wooded ground, which in that poor region of the northern Ozarks can be had for little enough in the best of years. Then he has the...
Preserving the Land Columbus Saw First
In October of 1492, when Christopher Columbus landed on San Salavador, part of what is now the 700-island nation of the Bahamas, he described groves of mature forests and massive trees. Today the nation's innovative Bahamas National Park system, though...
Sowing City Seeds
In his deep teacher's voice, Richard Taylor tells his students to get out their diaries and write down what they did today. "You planted seeds, you learned how to space them ..." he starts. Notebooks open, and the room becomes quiet. Today is payday...
The Biggest American Beech
From Shakespeare's Orlando to today's infatuated adolescent, people have carved their messages of love and glory into the smooth bark of the enduring beech tree. It is no coincidence that the word book was derived from the Old English word bece, meaning...
The Blue Mountains: Forest out of Control
I never saw anything more beautiful, the river winding about rough the ravines, the forests so different. The country all rough is burnt over so often there is not the least underbrush, but the grass grows thick and beautiful. So recorded Rebecca...
The Columbus White Oak
Indians weren't the only Native Americans in residence when Christopher Columbus first set sail for the New World 500 years ago. Also present was a living entity that's still around to tell the story--if only it could. It's the Columbus white oak...
The Public Forests of Tomorrow
I've always enjoyed speculating about the future. It's a delightful mental exercise that sharpens our imaginations and creative abilities. And though it can be a serious exercise, an active sense of humor is almost essential. Overly serious computer...
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