Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 81, No. 311, March

A Hierarchy of Servitude: Ceramics at Lake Innes Estate, New South Wales
Introduction The Lake Innes Estate was created in 1830/1831 by Major Archibald Clunes Innes, a retired officer of the British Army who built up considerable farming and commercial interests in what is now north-eastern New South Wales. The estate...
Early Formative Pottery Trade and the Evolution of Mesoamerican Civilisation
A recent commentary by Hector Neff in Antiquity (80: 714-16) continues a debate concerning Early Formative pottery exchange and its role in the development of Mesoamerican civilisation. The debate was sparked by a report of an INAA analysis of a non-random...
Editorial
* The repositioning of archaeology at Edinburgh has been of exceptional interest, not just out of sentiment for the Abercromby Chair (Antiquity 80: 778-79), but because of the current signals for the subject's future coming from a great university....
Evaluation of Corona and Ikonos High Resolution Satellite Imagery for Archaeological Prospection in Western Syria
Introduction An increasing number of archaeological researchers are routinely employing satellite imagery, particularly those working in western Asia (Ur 2003; Philip et al. 2002a; Kouchoukos 2001). The spatial, spectral, radiometric and even temporal...
Formation and Destruction of Pastoral and Irrigation Landscapes on the Mughan Steppe, North-Western Iran
Introduction The palimpsest model of archaeological landscapes describes how natural and cultural processes will damage or erase some early features but allow others to survive to some degree (Crawford 1953: 51). In a brief statement, Christopher...
Grape-Pressings from Northern Greece: The Earliest Wine in the Aegean?
Introduction The significance of the grape and its products, mainly wine, for prehistoric societies in the Aegean, in particular those of the Bronze Age, has been widely emphasised in the archaeological literature. Both Renfrew (1972) and Gilman...
History and Archaeology: The State of Play in Early Medieval Europe
This paper takes as its starting point three recent books, Framing the Early Middle Ages by Chris Wickham, Europe After Rome by Julia Smith and The Fall of Rome, by Bryan Ward-Perkins. It also makes reference to four other major works published or...
Late Magdalenian Feminine Flint Plaquettes from Poland
Introduction Flat schematic statuettes of ivory, bone or stone (Figure 1), with stylised outlines suggesting curvaceous womanly shapes with prominent buttocks, and dating roughly between 16 and 14 000 cal BP, are well known from many western and...
Networks and Nodal Points: The Emergence of Towns in Early Viking Age Scandinavia
Introduction Urban life was once considered alien to Scandinavia in the Viking Age. But in recent years the list of sites associated with trade and urbanism has grown lengthy. Embryonic towns are now claimed in some regions to have outnumbered the...
New Book Chronicle
Aegean archaeology is not only producing admirable new reports (see the reviews by Susan Sherratt, Jane Renfrew and Oliver Dickinson in Antiquity 80 (310) for December 2006), but is also becoming reflexive. Two books in particular, Mythos and Archaeology...
Pottery Neolithic Landscape Modification at Dhra'
Introduction Recent research by anthropologists, economists and geographers has focused new attention on the extent to which early small-scale societies modified the landscape around them (Smith & Wishnie 2000; Terrell et al. 2003). It is argued...
Regional Groups in the European Middle Gravettian: A Reconsideration of the Rayssian Technology
Introduction The Middle Gravettian period in south-west France is divided into two phases largely based on the stratification at the site of the Abri Pataud (David 1985). The first is characterised by an abundance of Noailles burins (Noaillian phase)...
The Aurignacian in the Zagros Region: New Research at Yafteh Cave, Lorestan, Iran
Introduction In Europe, modern humans and the Aurignacian culture appeared, abruptly, at around 36 500 BP (Verpoorte 2005). The absence of local regional traces suggests an external origin for the phenomenon, by way of a significant population migration....
The Iron Age Ritual Building at Uppakra, Southern Sweden
Introduction In Iron Age Scandinavia (500 BC-AD 1000), research priority has been given to in-depth analyses of societal conditions during the last decades. There has been lively discussion of topics such as the concentration of political power...
The Perils of Pseudo-Orwellianism
R. Alexander Bentley (2006) provides a provocative and timely challenge to archaeologists (and indeed to all scholars) in his quirky and tongue-in-cheek essay, 'Academic copying, archaeology and the English language' (Antiquity 80:196-201). The dangers...
The Transition to Farming in Eastern Africa: New Faunal and Dating Evidence from Wadh Lang'o and Usenge, Kenya
Introduction One of the most important developments in African archaeology and cognate disciplines over the last few decades has been the increasing sophistication of the types of model used to document and explain the so-called 'Bantu Expansion'....
The World Recreated: Redating Silbury Hill in Its Monumental Landscape
Introduction There came a time in many past societies when prodigious amounts of labour were directed into great tasks of construction, and few parts of the world are without mounds, pyramids, ziggurats or other substantial earthworks of some kind....