Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 79, No. 303, March

Core-Periphery Relations in the Recuay Hinterlands: Economic Interaction at Chinchawas, Peru
Introduction For many world regions, core-periphery perspectives have become increasingly important to model the interaction that ancient polities have with client or subject groups. These models benefit by focusing on regional asymmetries in political...
Detecting Plague: Palaeodemographic Characterisation of a Catastrophic Death Assemblage
Introduction The palaeodemographic signatures of epidemics are of perennial interest to biological anthropologists. It has been demonstrated that patterns of human mortality generally demonstrate a high degree of uniformity across populations (Paine...
Editorial
The Theoretical Archaeology Group 2004 had its conference in Glasgow where 450 delegates were treated to the legendary hospitality of that city. One innovation of "Tartan TAG" was a ceilidh in which theorists were put through an exceptionally well-organised...
Ethnic Identity and Archaeology in the Black Sea Region of Turkey
Introduction While many scholars treat archaeology as if it were simply an objective search for remains of past civilizations, it is clear that, in all parts of the world, its practice has been shaped by philosophical processes as well as socio-political...
Experiment and Innovation: Early Islamic Industry at Al-Raqqa, Syria
Introduction The city of al-Raqqa in north central Syria is located close to the confluence of the river Euphrates with its tributary the Balikh (Figure 1). The origin of settlement at the location occupied by al-Raqqa probably lies in the third...
Mapping Prehistoric Statue Roads on Easter Island
Introduction Scholars have long debated on how the colossal statues (moai) on Easter Island were transported to every corner of the island. The ancient people of Easter Island carved and moved hundreds of multi-ton statues up to 18km over rugged...
Microlith to Macrolith: The Reasons Behind the Transformation of Production in the Irish Mesolithic
Introduction The earliest reliable evidence of human presence in Ireland dates to about 8000 cal BC and the Irish Mesolithic appears to continue until 4000 cal BC (Woodman 1981). Most regions of Europe can document a gradual and sometimes continuous...
Mid Fourth-Millennium Copper Mining in Liguria, North-West Italy: The Earliest Known Copper Mines in Western Europe
Introduction Our understanding of the origins of copper metallurgy in Europe has developed somewhat since Renfrew (1969, 1970: 306-8, figure 10) posited independent origins for copper working in the Balkans and in the Iberian Peninsula. One key...
New Book Chronicle
This issue features the last of Dr Nicholas James's book chronicle, known to readers of Antiquity as 'Among the New Books'. The review section, produced since March 1999 under his erudite and elegant editorship, will now come from York and take on...
On the Eve of Islam: Archaeological Evidence from Eastern Arabia
Introduction 'Few events in human history have transformed the face of such a large part of the globe as rapidly and as decisively as did the expansion of early Islam' is Fred Donner's somewhat Churchillian assessment of the historical significance...
Raw, Pre-Heated or Ready to Use: Discovering Specialist Supply Systems for Flint Industries in Mid-Neolithic (Chassey Culture) Communities in Southern France
Introduction The research led by Patricia Phillips at the University of Sheffield on the honey-coloured Bedoulien flint industries (silex blond bedoulien) was of fundamental importance for the understanding of Chassey culture societies in southern...
Remarks on Samarra and the Archaeology of Large Cities
Introduction In 1995 Roland Fletcher published a work entitled The Limits of Settlement Growth, in which he looked at the possibilities of settlement size in ancient cities. While much of his analysis does not concern us, the question of the world's...
Stable Isotopes and Faunal Bones. Comments on Milner et Al. (2004)
One of the first applications of stable isotope analysis in archaeology was aimed at the investigation of dietary changes between Mesolithic and Neolithic times in northern Europe (Tauber 1981). Since then, important isotopic research related to this...
The Politics of Supply: The Neolithic Axe Industry in Alpine Europe
Introduction The circulation of certain high status artefacts as a reflection of organised production and supply is an important aspect of the Neolithic period (Binder & Perles 1990). A good example of such an artefact is offered by the polished...
The Role of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) Statuary as Territorial Boundary Markers
Introduction Polynesia's easternmost landmass, Rapa Nui (Easter Island), has attracted archaeological interest for more than a century. Although territoriality and monumental statuary have been addressed extensively in the past, spatial analysis...
The Wounded Roan: A Contribution to the Relation of Hunting and Trance in Southern African Rock Art
Introduction The advantage of studying art in southern Africa is that ethnographic and linguistic data are accessible as parts of belief systems that are likely to have developed over very long periods of time. The continent now has evidence for...
What Is 'Islamic' Archaeology?
Given the popularity of archaeology today and the prominence of the Muslim faith in contemporary world affairs, it is perhaps surprising that these two factors have not resulted in a flourishing discipline of Islamic archaeology. The reasons for this...