Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 68, No. 259, June

Agriculture and Herding in the Early Oasis Settlements of the Oxus Civilization
Gonur tepe: excavations and samples Collaborative research at the site of Gonur depe in Turkmenistan was initiated in 1989 to collect materials for palaeoethnobotanical and zooarchaeological research. Our goal was to reconstruct the systems of crop...
A Grooved Ware Wooden Structure at Knowth, Boyne Valley, Ireland
A new find at Knowth, the site in eastern Ireland famous for its complex of Neolithic passage-tombs, of a wooden structure associated with that enigmatic later Neolithic material, Grooved Ware. Excavations at Knowth have revealed a sequence of stages...
Ancient Maya Subsistence Diversity: Root and Tuber Remains from Cuello, Belize
A first notice of the mushy element in the subsistence base of the Maya realms. Introduction The question of prehispanic subsistence in the Maya lowlands has been vigorously debated, since the assessment of Classic Maya (AD 250-900) structural development,...
A New Approach to Interpreting Late Pleistocene Microlith Industries in Southwest Asia
Archaeologists have long assumed that morphological variability in microliths primarily reflects cultural differences among the makers. This forms the basis for differentiating major cultural/temporal traditions in the late Epipalaeolithic of southwest...
Antiquities in the Market-Place: Placing a Price on Documentation
To those of us who wish there was no commercial trade in antiquities, colleagues -- and those themselves active in the market -- say there always has been one and always will be. Since concern largely arises from destruction of context and loss of information,...
Are Collectors the Real Looters?
More on the vexed question of collectors, looting, and on the right relationship between museums, researchers and the antiquities market 'Collectors are the real looters': under this title, Colin Renfrew replied to one of the harsher reviewers of his...
Central Asia in the Bronze Age: Sedentary and Nomadic Cultures
The Central Asian Bronze Age: discovery, nature, antecedents In the 1880s A.V. Komarov excavated a trench through the Anau mound near Ashgabat in Turkmenistan. He had hoped to discover a tomb but instead uncovered a variety of ancient ceramics. Such...
City and State in Pre-Roman Spain: The Example of Ilici
What is the nature of the cities and chiefdoms, the states or proto-states or would-be states that fringe the Roman Empire? Modern Spain, like other regions that were first outside and then inside Empire, shows social transformations that were as important...
Cuneiform Inscriptions Made Visible on Bronze Plates from the Upper Anzaf Fortress, Turkey
X-ray study of bronze plates from a fortress of the 1st millennium BC reveals cuneiform inscriptions on metal surfaces that are now wholly hidden by corrosion. The Anzaf fortresses and the bronze hoard The two Anzaf fortresses of the Urartu period...
Editorial
This editorial is begun while I am staying in the Disneyland Hotel, Anaheim, California, whose Vice-President tells me in a mini-mission statement in the room, 'My staff and I want your visit to be a dream come true. All of us believe that Disney Resort...
Heritage Management as Postprocessual Archaeology?
The postmodern, or 'postprocessual', tendency in contemporary archaeology pays much attention in its rhetoric to that wider public, that wider constituency whose views of the past may not match much or at all with the academics. What happens when the...
Making the Most of Radiocarbon Dating: Some Statistical Considerations
The revised radiocarbon calibration curve, published last year, extends back into the Pleistocene the radiocarbon determinations that can be converted to real calendar years. For determinations of any age, the right judgements and statistical considerations...
Mons Claudianus and the Problem of the 'Granito del Foro': A Geological and Geochemical Approach
Granito del foro is a distinctive igneous rock, in fact a granodiorite rather than a granite, long known and named for its use in buildings of the Roman Forum. Exactly what is it? Where does it come from? Where else was it used and not used? What does...
Natural Wonders and National Monuments: A Meditation upon the Fate of the Tolmen
A key place in the 19th-century view of the British prehistoric landscape was taken by an ancient wonder which was not a human or artificial device at all. An account of this anomaly is called for. This paper is concerned with the definition of natural...
Of Lightning Brothers and White Cockatoos: Dating the Antiquity of Signifying Systems in the Northern Territory, Australia
Northern Australia is one of the very few regions of the world where an established tradition of rock-art has continued and extends into present-day knowledge. Excavation of deposits under the painted surfaces allows the age of the paintings to be estimated,...
Palaeoenvironmental Evidence for Human Colonization of Remote Oceanic Islands
Not every first footstep on a virgin shore leaves enduring trace, nor every first human settlement an enduring deposit that chances to survive, and then chances to be observed archaeologically. Good environmental evidence from Mangaia Island, central...
Production Evidence for the Origins of the Oxus Civilization
The Oxus Civilization defined An important recent development in the archaeology of the ancient Near East has been the discovery and exploration of hundreds of settlements in the desert oases of northern Afghanistan (Sarianidi 1977), Uzbekistan (Askarov...
Radiocarbon and Archaeomagnetic Dates from Konispol Cave, Albania
Albania, isolated from Europe for nearly half a century, was closed to absolute archaeological dating during that time. New dates from an unusual large cave-site in southern Albania go beyond the single first radiocarbon date published for the country...
Radiocarbon Determinations, Luminescence Dating and Australian Archaeology
The September 1993 editorial (ANTIQUITY 65: 44-5) made comment on recent Australian dates, by luminescence techniques, significantly older than radiocarbon determinations from elsewhere in Australia and New Guinea, which formed a single continent in...
Temples of Bronze Age Margiana: Traditions of Ritual Architecture
Margiana, a country listed on the Behistun inscription, is thought to be located on the ancient delta of the Murgab river in the Karakum desert of Turkmenistan. Its discovery and exploration by Soviet archaeologists in the last 20 years reveal a previously...
The Bronze Age Khanates of Central Asia
It would make far more sense, perhaps, to derive states from achievement-oriented big-man societies than it would from ascriptively-determined chiefdoms. (NORMAN YOFFEE 1993: 65) The Oxus Civilization, chiefdoms and states Recently Norman Yoffee (1993)...
The Central Asian Dimension of the Symbolic System in Bactria and Margiana
The Oxus and its iconography The Bronze Age civilization of Bactria and Margiana emerged after 2500 BC from the local cultures represented at the sites of Sarazm, Mundigak and Shar-i Sokhta, incorporating elements from Turkmenia (especially in Margiana),...
The Creative Use of Bias in Field Survey
A modest experiment explores what is seen and what is not seen in field survey, and what can be done about it. Introduction The Editor of ANTIQUITY recently described a sensation that must be familiar to many archaeologists. It is 'the special moment...
The Late Medieval Mint Workshops at the Archbishop's Palace, Trondheim
Recent excavations at the Archbishop's Palace in the city of Trondheim, Norway, have brought to light mint workshops of the period 1458/1483-1537. Surviving internal arrangements, analogous with features portrayed in contemporary illustrations, are uniquely...
The Oxus Civilization: The Bronze Age of Central Asia
Central Asia is dominated by the two great riverine systems that drain the Hindu Kush: the Syr Darya and the Amur Darya. The Amur Darya, referred to as the Oxus River in Classical antiquity, flows from east to west through the region the Greeks called...
Unwelcome Companions: Ancient Rats Reviewed
The commensal rats -- notably the black rat Rattus rattus and the brown R. norvegicus -- are among mankind's most destructive and dangerous enemies, and have spread relentlessly with humans across the globe. A decade after an important fatty meeting...