Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 73, No. 282, December

A Discourse of Wonders: Audience and Performance in Ovid's `Metamorphoses'
STEPHEN M. WHEELER. A discourse of wonders: audience and performance in Ovid's `Metamorphoses'. x+272 pages. 1999. Philadelphia (PA): University of Pennslyvania Press; 0-8122-3475-8; hardback; $49.95 & 37.50 [pounds sterling]. Seven of the 13...
Agricultural Production and Social Change in the Bronze Age of Southeast Spain: The Gatas Project
The site of Gatas is located in the foothills of the sierra Cabrera, on the southern edge of the basin of Vera, in the east of Almeria province, southeast Spain (FIGURES 1-2). The hill on which the settlement is located occupies an area of about 1...
Ancient Greek Cult Practice from the Archaeological Evidence: Proceedings of the Fourth International Seminar on Ancient Greek Cult, Organized by the Swedish Institute at Athens, 22-24 October 1993
ROBIN HAGG (ed.). Ancient Greek cult practice from the archaeological evidence: proceedings of the Fourth International Seminar on Ancient Greek Cult, organized by the Swedish Institute at Athens, 22-24 October 1993 (Skrifter Utgivna av Svenska Institutet...
Ancient Greek Hero Cult: Proceedings of the Fifth International Seminar on Ancient Greek Cult, Organized by the Department of Classical Archaeology & Ancient History, Goteborg University, 21-23 April 1995
ROBIN HAGG (ed.). Ancient Greek hero cult: proceedings of the Fifth International Seminar on Ancient Greek Cult, organized by the Department of Classical Archaeology & Ancient History, Goteborg University, 21-23 April 1995 (Skrifter Utgivna av...
A Neolithic Revolution? New Evidence of Diet in the British Neolithic
Introduction It is tempting to think of the Early Neolithic in southern Britain as being represented as a complete `package' of traits, including pottery, megalithic tombs and wooden structures, and domesticated plants and animals. Indeed, at many...
Caroline Malone, Simon Stoddart & Nicholas James
Now that ANTIQUITY has reached its last 1999 issue, the editorial team has pondered how to mark this arbitrary moment: indeed, an especially arbitrary moment for a journal which has many contributions from prehistory. A National Maritime Museum exhibition...
Cimex Lectularius L., the Common Bed Bug from Pharaonic Egypt
Introduction The desiccating conditions of the edge of the Egyptian desert provide excellent media for the preservation of biological materials. The vertebrate and plant remains from tombs are well known (Boessneck 1988; Hepper 1990). More recently,...
Dynamics of Hohokam Obsidian Circulation in the North American Southwest
Introduction With the largest canal irrigation network in North America (Doolittle 1990: 79-81), the Hohokam culture was an apex of non-state socio-political complexity in the pre-contact New World. The Hohokam were sedentary agriculturalists who...
Flint and Pyrite: Making Fire in the Stone Age
Introduction The domestication of fire must be ranked among the key `revolutions' in prehistory. The sociologist Goudsblom (1992) has drawn attention to the fact that of the main attributes of `civilization' -- tool-use, language and control of...
Germany
TACITUS (tr. Herbert W. Benario). Germany. 123 pages, 3 figures, I map. 1999. Warminster: Aris & Phillips; 0-85668-716-2 hardback 35 [pounds sterling] & $59.95; 0-85668-716-2 paperback 13.25 [pounds sterling] & $22. ORRIEUX & SCHMITT...
Has Australia Backdated the Human Revolution?
Recently, two views have predominated about the peopling of Australia. For some workers, there were two original colonizations of the continent (Thorne & Wolpoff 1992; Frayer et al. 1993). An early one, originating from the archaic Homo erectus...
Homer's Traditional Art
JOHN MILES FOLEY. Homer's traditional art. xviii+363 pages. 1999. University Park (PA): Pennsylvania State University Press; 0-271-01870-4 hardback $48.50. Seven of the 13 short papers in Ancient Greek cult practice consider evidence for rites or...
In Search of Authenticity: The Formation of Folklore Studies
REGINA BENDIX. In search of authenticity: the formation of folklore studies. xi+306 pages. 1997. Madison (WI): University of Wisconsin Press; 0-299-15540-4 & 0-299-15544-7 hardback & paperback 43.95 [pounds sterling] & 19.95 [pounds sterling]....
Introduzione a Polieno
MARIA TERESA SCHETTINO. Introduzione a Polieno. 341 pages. 1998. Pisa: ETS; 88-467-0179-8 paperback L45000. ORRIEUX & SCHMITT PANTEL's textbook covers the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods of Greek history. The treatment concentrates...
Marine Investigations in the Lakshadweep Islands, India
Introduction India, one of the oldest maritime nations of the world, has been maintaining commercial and cultural contacts with African, Arabian and Southeast Asian countries for the last 5000 years. The findings of excavations at various coastal...
Mitos, Dioses, Heroes En El Mediterraneo Antiguo
J.M. BLAZQUEZ. Mitos, dioses, heroes en el Mediterraneo antiguo. 383 pages. 1999. Madrid: Real Academia de la Historia; 84-89512-33-7 paperback. M.C. Astour, dedicatee of the 29 papers and subject of the two interviews assembled by YOUNG et al.,...
Palaeolithic Mollusc Exploitation at Riparo Mochi (Balzi Rossi, Italy): Food and Ornaments from the Aurignacian through Epigravettian
Introduction The early Upper Palaeolithic of Europe is distinguished by the sudden appearance of art, ornaments, and a quickened pace of technological diversification (Bietti 1997; Gamble 1986; Hahn 1972; Harrold 1989; Kozlowski 1990; Kuhn &...
Paradise Lost: The Bombing of the Temple of the Tooth -- a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Sri Lanka
Introduction That archaeology has played a significant role in the creation of nation-states around the globe is well attested (Diaz-Andreu & Champion 1996; Kohl & Fawcett 1995; Gathercole & Lowenthal 1994). From Smith's manipulation...
Prehistoric Agricultural Production on Easter Island (Rapa Nui), Chile
Introduction Traditional Pacific island societies are fundamentally agricultural populations and their production systems have been the focus of extensive ethnographic research (e.g. Barrau 1961; 1965; Brookfield 1972; Kirch 1990; 1994; Malinowski...
Pubic Lice (Pthirus Pubis L.) Were Present in Roman and Medieval Britain
Studies of insect remains preserved in archaeological deposits are providing a wide range of information about past human economy, resource exploitation, diet, activity and living conditions. Recent work is exemplified by Buckland et al. (1994; 1996),...
Re-Assessing the Logboat from Lurgan Townland, Co. Galway, Ireland
Logboats have been found in northwestern Europe in large numbers and it is clear that they were in use from the Neolithic to late medieval times (Lanting & Brindley 1996). Because they are relatively robust, their survival rate compares favourably...
Seeds of Urbanism: Palaeoethnobotany and the Indus Civilization
Within the Harappan or Indus Valley Civilization located in northwest South Asia, a dramatic shift towards more localized cultural units and away from urban complexes is thought to have begun at the end of the 3rd millennium BC. The reasons for decentralization...
Stone Sarcophagus Manufacture in Ancient Egypt
The creation of sarcophagi from single blocks of stone, particularly the hard, igneous varieties, was accomplished by the development of stone sawing and drilling skills: the saws and drills for working hard stone, and indeed illustrations of the processes,...
Technical Strategies and Technical Change at Neolithic Catalhoyuk, Turkey
Catalhoyuk East(1) Catalhoyuk is a large early ceramic Neolithic site in Central Anatolia that was occupied between the mid 9th and early 8th millennium BP.(2) It is situated in the Konya Plain; a vast interior drainage basin and alluvial fan enclosed...
The Concept of Affordance and GIS: A Note on Llobera (1996)
Llobera's project Marcos Llobera (1996: 612) attempts to use Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in a more `humanistic way', to explore `places and spaces' and to `close the gap between theory and method'. The theory in question is that of human...
The Curing of Hides and Skins in European Prehistory
Introduction Like all organic materials, prehistoric hides and skins are preserved only under specific circumstances, in our area mostly in anaerobic environments.(1) Thus there are numerous examples of leather and fur found in waterlogged conditions...
The Earliest Evidence of Wheeled Vehicles in Europe and the near East
Introduction The appearance of wheeled vehicles in Europe and the Near East during the 4th millennium BC is a major socio-economic development. In the past, eminent archaeologists such as Childe (1951), Piggott (1979; 1983) and, more recently, Sherratt...
`The Mystery of Husbandry': Medieval Animals and the Problem of Integrating Historical and Archaeological Evidence
Introduction In 1697 one Leonard Meagre published a general farming treatise entitled The Mystery of Husbandry: or Arable, Pasture and Woodland improved (Fussell 1947). This title is still relevant today as medieval and early modern husbandry are...
The Oldest Ever Brush Hut Plant Remains from Ohalo II, Jordan Valley, Israel (19,000 BP)
Introduction Architectural remains of dwellings are extremely rare in Upper Palaeolithic (c. 45,000-20,000 BP) and early Epipalaeolithic (c. 20,000-12,500 BP) sites in the Near East (e.g. Bar-Yosef & Belfer-Cohen 1989; 1992; Henry 1989; Garrard...
The Oldest Metallurgy in Western Europe
Introduction Rescue excavations in 1994 at Cerro Virtud (Almeria, Spain), a site dated to the first half of the 5th millennium BC, have provided the oldest evidence for metallurgy in western Europe. This date is more than a millennium older than...
Understanding the Initial Colonization of Scotland
Introduction Scotland was substantially ice free by 13000 BP and by around 12,500 BP temperatures were probably similar to those of the present time. The subsequent Loch Lomond stadial glaciation did not entirely cover the country and left most...