Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 74, No. 286, December

A 3rd-Millennium BC Elite Tomb from Tell Umm El-Marra, Syria
An intact wealthy tomb dating to the later 3rd millennium BC was discovered in the 2000 spring-summer season of the Dutch-American expedition to Tell Umm el-Marra, Syria. This structure provides further evidence of the trend towards conspicuous and...
Agro-Pastoralist Colonization of Cyprus in the 10th Millennium BP: Initial Assessments
A startling variety of new evidence from Cyprus demonstrates that the introduction of the Neolithic occurred in the 10th millennium BP, over a millennium earlier than often assumed in studies of Mediterranean island colonizations (e.g. Stanley Price...
Among the New Books
Food and farming Whence archaeologists' concern with the development of agriculture? Dr RUDEBECK (details below) argues that it springs from the Modern Western tradition of thought about progress from states of nature to civilization. After reviewing...
Ana Manuku: A Prehistoric Ritualistic Site on Mangaia, Cook Islands
Introduction Archaeological and palaeontological research has demonstrated the often profound impact of colonizing humans on previously isolated island ecosystems, including forest clearance, erosion and alluvial deposition, biotic scarcity and...
A New Decorated Menhir
Well-known monuments continue to yield surprises. The bold zig-zag carving on the menhir of La Bretelliere, in the departement of Maine-et-Loire some 55 km southwest of Angers and 40 km east of Nantes, is the latest in a series of unexpected discoveries...
A Recent Find of a Possible Lower Palaeolithic Assemblage from the Foothills of the Zagros Mountains
The Mehran Plain to the northwest of the Deh Luran Plain is located between the central parts of lowland Mesopotamia and the foothills of the Zagros Mountains at an altitude of 100-400 m a.s.l. After a long hiatus in archaeological fieldwork following...
Categorizing Archaeological Finds: The Funerary Material of Queen Hetepheres I at Giza
In this article I present a problematic case in Egyptian archaeology that exemplifies some pitfalls in the categorization of archaeological remains and their indirect effects on interpretation. The find itself has been known for more than 70 years;...
Digital Enhancement of Torres Strait Rock-Art
Eight thousand years ago, the land bridge linking New Guinea and Australia into a single landmass finally sundered under post-glacial rising seas. Today, over 150 rocky, muddy and sandy islands form Torres Strait. The region is home to numerous inter-connected...
Editorial
As readers will see, the Colour Notes continue to flood into the Antiquity office, and we are delighted to include diverse and stimulating material from around the world. Clearly there is no crisis in the enterprise and energy that archaeological colleagues...
Excavation of an Acheulian Workshop at Isampur, Karnataka (India)
Isampur is one among a remarkably dense concentration of 200 Acheulian sites of the Lower Palaeolithic stage located in the Hunsgi and Baichbal valleys of peninsular India. The two valleys constitute an amphitheatre-like erosional basin (about 500...
Flaking Properties, Petrology and Use of Polish Flint
Introduction From the Middle Palaeolithic to Early Bronze Age, flint was used extensively in Poland for stone tool manufacture (Lech 1981; Balcer 1983). Three different flint types were mined around the Holy Cross Mountains of southeastern Poland...
Geoffrey William Dimbleby
1917-2000 Professor G.W. Dimbleby was a pioneer in the study of environmental archaeology. Like many other archaeologists of his and earlier generations, he was trained as a scientist -- in his case in botany -- and brought an interdisciplinary...
Hammat Al-Qa and the Roots of Urbanism in Southwest Arabia
Arabia is not known for its early towns and there are few records of urban-scale settlements before the 1st millennium BC. Our aim here is to announce the existence of numerous large settlements of the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC in highland Yemen, and...
In Memoriam V. Gordon Childe
In March 2000, a visiting American archaeologist, LuAnn Wandsnider, asked a seemingly simple question in the Staff Club at the University of Sydney. LuAnn wanted to visit the grave of V. Gordon Childe who died in the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney...
Marija Gimbutas: Some Observations about Her Early Years, 1921-1944
Marija Gimbutas (1921-1994) even after her death towers as a mythic figure in European archaeology; seminars at universities, such as Umea University in Sweden, are being held on her archaeological work (Hjorungdal 1999:77) and her interpretations...
Marki Alonia: A Prehistoric Bronze Age Settlement in Cyprus
The Australian Cyprus Expedition recently completed its seventh major excavation season at the Early and Middle Bronze Age settlement site of Marki Alonia in central Cyprus. About 1500 sq. m of this 5-ha site have now been fully excavated, and another...
New Evidence from Bryn Yr Hen Bobl, Llanedwen, Anglesey
Bryn yr Hen Bobl (NGR SH 5185 6900) is a large Neolithic chambered cairn lying in pasture and parkland on the west side of the Plas Newydd estate, Anglesey. The site was most recently excavated by W.J. Hemp (1929-1934) (Hemp 1936; Lynch 1969: 161-2;...
New Fieldwork at Shuqba Cave and in Wadi En-Natuf, Western Judea
`As it will be convenient to have a name for this culture, I propose to call it Natufian, after the Wady en-Natuf at Shukba, where we first found it in place' GARROD 1929:222 The Levant has long been the focus for study of the `Neolithic transition'....
Palaeolithic Perishables Made Permanent
Introduction Reconstructions of prehistoric lifeways have always been based on insights gained from the study of durable materials made of stone, ivory, antler and bone. This is especially true as one moves back in time and considers the Pleistocene...
Peau Noire, Masques Blancs: Self-Image in the Mesolithic-Neolithic Transition in Scotland
Approaches to the British Mesolithic-Neolithic transition currently focus on the role of the native Mesolithic, offering opportunities to explore processes of internal social and economic transformation rather than those of migration and colonization...
Pollen and Phytoliths in Stone Mounds at Pouerua, Northland, New Zealand: Implications for the Study of Polynesian Farming
Introduction Current archaeological understanding of pre-European Maori farming is based largely on inferences drawn from anecdotal accounts of the late 18th and early 19th centuries (Best 1925; Leach 1979), and indirect evidence such as landscape...
Radiocarbon Chronology of the Kalmykia Catacomb Culture of the West Eurasian Steppe
Introduction The Eurasian steppes are rich in prehistoric artefacts enabling the construction of chronologies (Rassamakin 1994). These traditional relative chronologies are still based on the relative sequence of cultures, which allow the correlation...
Refutation of the Myth: New Fortified Settlement from Late Bronze Age/Early Iron Age in Wielkopolska Region (Poland)
Polish archaeology is characterized by the culture-historical approach (Kobylinski 1991; Minta-Tworzowska & Raczkowski 1996). The limited theoretical discussion has led to a situation in which stereotypes of research procedures have been formed...
Research on the Middle Palaeolithic in Dalmatia, Croatia
The Palaeolithic sites of Croatia are internationally important for their association of lithic industries and fossil human remains. The most significant sites include Krapina and Vindija in the Hrvatsko Zagorje region (northwestern Croatia). Middle...
Responses to Geoffrey Wainwright's Report `the Stonehenge We Deserve', Antiquity 74 (2000): 334-42
`The Stonehenge we don't deserve' The Stonehenge we are offered No sooner has Geoffrey Wainwright (2000) put forward English Heritage/National Trust (EH/ NT)'s latest dream in its Stonehenge Master Plan (1999) than it evaporates, another will...
Robert Manuel Cook
(4 July 1909-10 August 2000) `Deplorable' was one of his favourite words. But among the many things that Robert Cook found deplorable, young people were not included. For three decades after his official retirement as a university teacher, he savoured...
Sanchi and Its Archaeological Landscape: Buddhist Monasteries, Settlements & Irrigation Works in Central India
The Buddhist monastic complex at Sanchi in Central India, a recently designated `UNESCO World-Heritage' site, was established during the 3rd century BC as part of the westerly expansion of Buddhism from its base In the middle Gangetic plains. The distribution...
The Botanical Identity and Transport of Incense during the Egyptian New Kingdom
The burning of incense was a fundamental part of many ancient Egyptian ceremonies. Textual evidence indicates that the word sntr, translated as incense, was known from Early Dynastic times (2920-2575 BC) onward. However, the botanical identity of sntr...
The Former Kano? Ethnoarchaeology of Kufan Kanawa, Niger
A stone enclosure, rectangular, several metres high and still visible today, scaled the hills, ran along the crest over kilometres and protected [Kufan Kanawa] on four sides. Fifteen gates gave access to it ... (BROUIN 1938: 469-70). Kufan Kanawa...
The Ipatovo Kurgan on the North Caucasian Steppe (Russia)
In the course of rescue excavations ahead of pipeline construction, a large burial burial mound (kurgan, in the Russian terminology) with a long history of use has been excavated near the small town of Ipatovo, some 120 km northeast of Stavropol (North...
The Living and the Dead in Northern Scotland 3500-2000 BC
Introduction Monumental architecture dominates the archaeological record of prehistoric Britain and has often been central to the interpretation of early societies. Monuments may have changed the relationship between people and the natural world....
Time Please
Introduction I had been working in archaeology for about 10 years before my father thought to tell me that he had worked as a labourer for Cyril Fox in 1925 on a prehistoric tomb at Kilpaison Burrows near the village in Pembrokeshire where I was...
Wall Recesses for Bee Hives
Introduction Until the introduction of movable-frame bee hives in the late 19th century, beekeepers used traditional hives they made from local materials. The type of hive varied from region to region according to local climate and materials, and...
Weathering of Petroglyphs: Direct Assessment and Implications for Dating Methods
Introduction Few records of ancient human cultures evoke the sense of wonder and concern over their precarious survival than the remains of their `art', applied with pigments or etched into the rock of canyon cliffs and cave walls. But for all its...