Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 75, No. 289, September

A Contextual Study of the `Fossilized' Prehispanic Canal Systems of the Tehuacan Valley, Puebla, Mexico
Nearly three decades ago, Woodbury & Neely (1972) published the first analysis of the extensive and complex system of Prehispanic canals found in the northern portion of the Tehuacan Valley of Puebla, Mexico. These springfed canals, functioning...
Among the New Books
The environment Environmental archaeology (details below) considers the `profound fracture ... between archaeologists dealing with the artefactual evidence and those engaged in the study of biological and geological remains' (p. 4). The editor opens...
AMS [sup.14]C Age Determinations of Rapanui (Easter Island) Wood Sculpture: Moai Kavakava ET 48.63 from Brussels
Unlike the giant monolithic sculpture on Easter Island, portable Rapanui woodcarvings apparently remained unnoticed by the Western explorers of the Southern Pacific until the second voyage of James Cook in 1774. The first wooden sculpted artefacts...
An Amarna-Period Ostracon from the Valley of the Kings
The Amarna Royal Tombs Project (ARTP) initiated its programme of archaeological survey and excavation in the central part of Egypt's Valley of the Kings in November 1998, and has now completed three successive seasons of work under the joint field-direction...
A View from the Old School
The archaeological profession is indebted to Geoff Wainwright (GW) for his masterly essay on the political history of British archaeology since the war. He has often been seen as representing whatever state agency supported archaeology. GW has taken...
Bridging the Gap: New Fieldwork in Northern Morocco
The question of human contacts between Africa and the Iberian Peninsula in the Middle and Upper Pleistocene is of key interest in research of human origins. Discussion continues to focus on whether the sea gap separating the landmasses proved an effective...
Carnelian Mines in Gujarat
In June-July 2000 a sample collection programme was completed in the extant carnelian mines of Jhagadia Taluka, Broach District, Gujarat, Western India (FIGURE 1). The predominant rationale behind the fieldwork is an Africanist one. Namely, to obtain...
Cut Not Smashed: A New Type of Evidence for Nut Exploitation from Sulawesi
In archaeology the recovery of `nuts' means the recovery of any hard-shelled fruit or seeds, further qualified as those eaten by people. Recent analysis of environmental samples from Leang Burung-1 in the Maros district of Sulawesi (FIGURE 1) led to...
Do-Ashkaft: A Recently Discovered Mousterian Cave Site in the Kermanshah Plain, Iran
Since Dorothy Garrod's pioneering work at the Mousterian site of Hazar Merd on the western slopes of the Zagros Mountains in 1928, a number of Middle Palaeolithic sites in the area have been discovered, sampled and, in some cases, partially excavated....
Early Preserved Polynesian Kumara Cultivations in New Zealand
Archaeological evidence for prehistoric gardening practices in Polynesia includes stone boundary walls, storage pits and structures, drainage systems and evidence for the modification of soil, but often the remains of horticultural practise are ephemeral....
Editorial
SIMON STODDART & CAROLINE MALONE `You must begin to extricate yourself from the media if you are going to exist as a respectable archaeologist' was the advice given to one editor of this journal, GLYN DANIEL, by his fellow academics (Taylor,...
Emerging Trends in Rock-Art Research: Hunter-Gatherer Culture, Land and Landscape
The archaeological perception of hunter--gatherer peoples who have created a large portion of the world's existing rock art has changed during the last 100 years. Radical shifts in prevailing theories about their rock art have emerged in the last decade...
`Fish-Tail' Projectile Points and Megamammals: New Evidence from Paso Otero 5 (Argentina)
Introduction Recently, archaeological knowledge of early human occupations in the Pampean region of Argentina has improved through new archaeological sites dated to c. 10,000-11,200 BP. Archaeological research carried out in Tandilia Serrana Area,...
Fleas from Pharaonic Amarna
The preservation of ectoparasites in archaeological sites is normally problematic, but the dry environment of the Egyptian desert keeps even the very fragile remains of fleas intact. Fleas, Siphonaptera, can be divided in three large groups: the...
Fragmentary Endings: A Discussion of 3rd-Millennium BC Burial Practices in the Oman Peninsula
Introduction Monuments to the dead in the form of graves and tombs comprise the majority of archaeological features surviving in the two countries on the Oman Peninsula, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the Sultanate of Oman. Archaeological sequences...
Last Orders?
Professor Geoffrey Wainwright's perspective on the last half-century of British archaeology (`Time please', ANTIQUITY 74 (2000): 909-43 -- below TP) was an explicitly personal account of a remarkable series of developments in which he played an influential...
Prehistoric Burial and Ritual, in Southwest Ireland
Archaeological monitoring of the construction of the N21 road improvements, Co. Kerry, Ireland, in 1999 uncovered four sub-circular features in the townland of Rockfield (FIGURE 1). [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The central feature revealed itself to...
Prehistoric Human Migration in the Linearbandkeramik of Central Europe
The Linearbandkeramik (LBK), dating from approximately 5700 to 5000 BC,(1) has traditionally been regarded as the initial phase of the Neolithic of Central Europe and a classic example of prehistoric migration. Its origin is thought to have been in...
Processing Palm Fruits in the Nile Valley -- Biomolecular Evidence from Qasr Ibrim
One of the most common species of palm found in Nubia (comprising modern-day southern Egypt and northern Sudan) is the date (Phoenix dactylifera L.), although other palms are seen in varying numbers, such as the dom palm (Hyphaene thebaica (L.) Mart.)...
Rameses II and the Tobacco Beetle
Introduction The recent publication of an extensive review of Egyptian trade and industry (Nicholson & Shaw 2000) revives a biogeographic conundrum, which should have been laid to rest over a decade ago. In her chapter on mummification, Rosalie...
Remembering, Forgetting and the Invention of Tradition: Burial and Natural Places in the English Early Bronze Age
Introduction Recently, the central role of memory in preserving, transmitting and negotiating material culture has rightly been stressed (see for example Gosden & Lock 1998; Bradley 2000: 155-8; Bradley & Williams 1998). These theories of...
Ringing the Changes: When Terminology Matters
Under the old Treasure Trove laws, small, single items of precious metal were frequently dismissed by Coroners as casual losses (although they still had to be reported). This meant that numbers of small items never went to inquest, as one of the criteria...
Roman Armour and Metalworking at Carlisle, Cumbria, England
Recent excavations at the Roman fort in Carlisle, Cumbria, have yielded a large number of pieces of articulated Roman armour and other items. This is the most important such find in Britain since the Corbridge hoard was excavated in 1964 (Allason-Jones...
Shell Rings of the Southeast US
Shell rings are circular and semi-circular deposits of shell (mostly oyster, Crassostrea virginica), faunal bone, artefacts and soil constructed along the Florida, Georgia and South Carolina coasts of the southeastern United States. Rings in Georgia...
The Donghulin Woman from Western Beijing: [sup.14]C Age and an Associated Compound Shell Necklace
Introduction Donghulin village is situated in the Western Hills area of the District of Mentougou, Beijing, at latitude 39 [degrees] 58'48" N and longitude 115 [degrees] 43'36" E, 455 m a.s.l. The village is about 80 km away from Beijing City (FIGURE...
The Dynamics of Wealth and Poverty in the Transegalitarian Societies of Southeast Asia
Introduction The goal of this article is to describe a major sector of the wealth-producing systems of tribal Southeast Asia and to understand the major constraints in wealth production and accumulation. Four domains exist where wealth is generated...
The Early Christian Bema Churches of Syria Revisited
The Limestone Massif of northwest Syria has the largest concentration of late antique churches in the world. All date from between the second half of the 4th century and the first decade of the 7th century and are remarkably consistent in their conformity...
The Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age Landscape of Interior Western Sicily
The archaeology of complex societies in western Sicily has traditionally focused upon Greek and Phoenician colonization rather than the development of the indigenous peoples of the interior. The Salemi regional survey project in western Sicily was...
The Second Phase of Neolithization in East-Central Europe
Introduction The first Neolithic, Linearbandkeramik agropastoral groups north of the Carpathian and Sudeten Mountains appeared c. 5500 cal BC (all dates are given calibrated). LBK sites are known from the Paris Basin to the western Ukraine. However,...
The Water Island Archaeological Project: Archaeology and History in the Eastern Caribbean
In 1998 extensive investigations were undertaken on Water Island, US Virgin Islands, by a research team from the Southeast Archeological Center, National Park Service. The US government is relinquishing ownership of the island, an action that would...
Time for a Last Quick One?
No put-down, this; rather an expression of how intriguing it is to observe the process by which the times through which one has lived are transmuted into acceptable history. It is good that so influential a contemporary as Geoffrey Wainwright (2000)...