Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 76, No. 294, December

A First Pompeii: The Early Bronze Age Village of Nola-Croce del Papa (Palma Campania Phase). (News & Notes)
In May 2001; in the immediate outskirts of Nola (an important city some 25 km from Naples), an Early Bronze Age village was discovered buried by an unexpected eruption of Vesuvius (the Pomici di Avellino eruption of 3550 BP). Three huts were found...
Ancestral Faces: A Preclassic Maya Skull-Mask from Cuello, Belize. (News & Notes)
Twenty years ago, one of us noted that `the extent to which ancestor veneration played a large part in Maya religion is-only now beginning to be appreciated' (Hammond 1982: 321), and that such veneration was explicitly portrayed in Classic Maya iconography...
Another Perspective. (Special Section)
In our opening editorial, we raised the question of what other professions and disciplines think of archaeology. As a discipline we can be too introverted and we have thus requested Another perspective. We took advice from august friends and colleagues,...
Antiquities Compared. (Special Section)
Whenever I pick up a copy of ANTIQUITY (which for purposes of clarity one of my colleagues refers to as Un-American Antiquity) I am struck by its contrast with the journal I edit. ANTIQUITY is more colourful (both literally, as of late, but also metaphorically,...
Antiquity and Britain. (Special Section)
The birth of ANTIQUITY in 1927 is a well-documented event. As its begetter and first editor, O.G.S. Crawford, tells us it came into being for a very specific purpose (Crawford 1955: 175): At the end of 19251 conceived the idea of starting a quarterly...
Antiquity and Early Humanity. (Special Section)
Introduction In this paper, I use the first 36 volumes of ANTIQUITY--from 1927 to 1962--to explore the unfolding of palaeoanthropological studies and knowledge of the process of human evolution. I chose to stop at 1962 as I contend that it is by...
Antiquity and the New World. (Special Section)
In his first editorial, ANTIQUITY's founder, O.G.S. Crawford, wrote `our field is the Earth, our range in time a million years or so, our subject the human race' (1927: 1). ANTIQUITY was established for British archaeologists, but Crawford sought to...
Antiquity and the Old World. (Special Section)
Introduction As with its treatment of world archaeology as a whole, ANTIQUITY's coverage of Old World archaeology has been encyclopaedic. All the important sites, excavations and discoveries are there, from Stonehenge to the frozen tombs of Siberia,...
Antiquity and the Scope of Archaeology. (Special Section)
The beginnings of world archaeology Our field is-the world, our range in time a million years or so, our subject the human race. CRAWFORD 1927: 1 In this short paper I want to make several bold claims for ANTIQUITY, and for the achievement...
Antiquity at 75. (Special Section)
I have been a reader of ANTIQUITY since I was an undergraduate, more years ago than I care. to contemplate. It occupies a special place in' my heart. The journal's pages have kept me in touch with a wider archaeological world when camped in Central...
Antiquity-The First 75 Years. (Special Section)
O.G.S. Crawford founded ANTIQUITY 75 years ago as a private venture and declared it to be a `needed organ to express the points of view' of scholars and `to publish the cream of their researches'. Its purpose was to `serve as a link between specialists...
Antiquity, Wheeler and Classical Archaeology. (Special Section)
My association with ANTIQUITY is shorter than that of some of those present, but I am slightly shocked to reflect that it still covers over half the journal's life. I became a subscriber in 1961 and my first archaeological publication was an ANTIQUITY...
Anyone for Writing? (Special Section)
`The universal interest in the past is perfectly natural. It is the interest in life itself. There was a time when archaeology was voted a dull subject, fit only for dry-as-dusts; yet it was not the subject that was dull, but its exponents. Those days...
A Politician's Perspective of Archaeology. (Special Section)
Typical Politician's Question! `Does archaeology have a relevance in this modern world?' To which I respond with an emphatic `Yes'. Human beings have a yearning to find out about our past. If it was not so, how could it be that for 50 years, ever-evolving...
Archaeology and `QAA Subject Review': What Did We Learn? (News & Notes)
In the middle of March 2002, with the last review of a Department of Archaeology in England, the process of assessing the quality of academic courses by Subject Specialist Reviewers (SSRs) appointed by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) came to a temporary...
`Archaeoonist Man'. (Special Section)
I assume that everyone is agreed that the earliest forms of human communication were by grunts and gesticulation and, in amicable circumstances, these methods must have been reasonably adequate. If, however, the fellow conversationalists were hostile...
Beads and Beakers: Heirlooms and Relics in the British Early Bronze Age
The idea that artefacts have biographies, with complex life cycles, is not a new one. The book The social life of things (Appadurai 1986a) has been influential amongst archaeologists, but very few detailed analyses of specific biographical trajectories...
Birch-Bark Tar at Neolithic Makriyalos, Greece. (News & Notes)
Introduction The potential for organic analysis of Neolithic pottery from Greece is largely unexplored. The results of a pilot study conducted on vessels from the Late Neolithic settlement at Makriyalos, northern Greece are reported in part here....
Britain
MILES RUSSELL. Prehistoric Sussex. 192 pages, 119 figures. 2002. Stroud & Charleston (SC): Tempus; 0-7524-1964-1 paperback 16.99 [pounds sterling] & $27.99. Dr RUSSELL sums up the archaeology of Sussex in six chapters, on the Palaeolithic...
Celebrating 75 Years of Antiquity. (Special Section)
The Archaeological Review If the scheme to found an archaeological quarterly should succeed, it will one day be of interest to know its inception. The idea was my own, and was suggested by the excellence of the old `Archaeological Review' published...
Combating the Destruction of Ethiopia's Archaeological Heritage. (News & Notes)
During November 2001, a joint American-British-Ethiopian archaeological team under the direction of Niall Finneran undertook a multi-period archaeological landscape survey of the region of Inda Selassie in the western administrative zone of Tigrai,...
Conservation and Presentation of Neolithic Beidha, Southern Jordan. (News & Notes)
The early Neolithic in the Levant, and specifically within Jordan, is critical to our understanding of the transition from hunter--gatherers to farmers, the beginnings of agriculture, the birth of religion and the emergence of community life. One of...
Current Middle & Upper Palaeolithic Research in the Southern Caucasus. (News & Notes)
Since 1997 an international research team has been reinvestigating Ortvale Klde, a Palaeolithic rockshelter located in the Georgian Republic (FIGURES 1 & 2). The main goals of this new collaborative project have been to document Middle and Upper...
Did Prehistoric Landscape Management Retard the Post-Glacial Spread of Woodland in Southwest Asia?
Introduction Archaeological research has revealed the detailed emergence and spread of Neolithic and later farming societies in Southwest Asia. Evidence from excavated seed remains and animal bones indicates that by the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB),...
Editorial
At the risk of developing an archaeological hagiography, we dwell in this our last editorial, at least in part, on the founder and first editor, whose decision to found the journal took place some 77 years ago (in 1925). Three editorial teams have...
Exploring Neolithic and Megalithic South India: The Bellary District Archaeological Project. (News & Notes)
The southern part of the Indian peninsula is an area of outstanding archaeological interest. While its historic cities and temples have long attracted the interest of both scholars and tourists, however, south India's equally remarkable prehistoric...
Finding the Coastal Mesolithic in Southwest Britain: AMS Dates and Stable Isotope Results on Human Remains from Caldey Island, South Wales
Introduction It has long been accepted that we will always be hampered in our reconstruction of early and mid-Holocene subsistence and settlement patterns across southern Britain due to the loss of the coastline by inundation. This is unfortunate...
FxJj43: An Early Stone Age Locality in Northern Kenya. (News & Notes)
FxJj43 is an Early Stone Age locality that lies towards the top of the Okote Member in the Koobi Fora Formation, in northwest Kenya, a geological formation famous for the extraordinary array of hominin remains it has yielded, together with abundant...
Giant Murals of Baja California: New Regional Archaeological Perspectives. (News & Notes)
A new regional archaeological project in the relatively unexplored Sierra de Guadalupe in Baja California Sur, Mexico, commenced in 2001 (Gutierrez 2000). This project, concerning the regional archaeological perspectives of the giant mural paintings...
`It's Better to Dig Than Dance': Archaeological Method and Theory in Antiquity 1927-2002. (Special Section)
Introduction Right from the start, papers and notes dealing with archaeological methods and theoretical perspectives have featured strongly between the covers of ANTIQUITY, jostling for attention with exciting new discoveries, popular pieces on...
Kani Mikaiil: A Seasonal Cave Site of the Middle Neolithic Period in Kurdestan, Iran. (News & Notes)
After several years of hiatus in Palaeolithic research in Iran, increasing activity in this field began in the early 1990s (see among others: Biglari 2000; Biglari & Heydari 2001; Roustaei et al. 2002). Although the Zagros Mountains in western...
Late Bronze Age Gaza: Prestige Production at El-Moghraqa. (News & Notes)
The Bronze Age locale of el-Moghraqa lies in an area of farmland and sand dune north of the wadi Gaza, approximately 700 m north of Tell el-`Ajjul. This area, the Palestinian terminus of the `Ways of Horus' (Oren 1987; 1993), was a key point of economic...
Looking out at Antiquity, from England to the World, 1927-2028. (Special Section)
O.G.S. Crawford founded ANTIQUITY in 1927 because the then existing British journals were too limited and parochial in their narrowness of interests. He sent out fliers, and vowed to start the journal if enough subscribers showed support for his programme...
Manching Revisited
In 1960 Werner Kramer reported in ANTIQUITY on excavations at the oppidum of Manching (Kramer 1960), setting out both the leitmotivs in the history of the oppidum and an overview of the finds. After 40 years, the excavated area of the oppidum (380...
Opening Comments for the 75th Anniversary of Antiquity, SAA Meeting, Denver (CO) 2002. (Special Section)
It is indeed an honour to be here today on this auspicious occasion, the 75th anniversary of one of the world's premier publications in archaeology. Most of you, and perhaps all of you, are aware that the names of SAA's journals, American Antiquity...
Palaeolithic Archaeology and 3D Visualization Technology: Recent Developments. (News & Notes)
This paper presents computer-aided lithic analysis conducted in the context of an interdisciplinary research framework combining computer science and archaeology--the Partnership for Research in Stereo Modeling (PRISM), at Arizona State University...
Power in Context: The Lismore Landscape Project. (News & Notes)
Modern studies of Iron Age landscapes in Scotland have concentrated on the outer islands (e.g. Parker Pearson & Sharpies 1999; Harding 2000), and most recently on areas such as Caithness (Heald & Jackson 2001). Argyll (FIGURE 1) has been recently...
Recent Finds from the Northern Mesopotamian City of Tell Brak. (News & Notes)
Until recently it had been thought that the first large cities in Mesopotamia, of which Uruk is the best-known example, had developed on the alluvial plain of Sumer during the 4th millennium BC. The discovery of a monumental building with a massive...
Satellite Image Analysis and Archaeological Fieldwork in El-Markha Plain (South Sinai). (News & Notes)
The application of satellite image analysis to archaeology is well known (Kennedy 1997: 71-93), but it is less frequently applied to the location of potential archaeological sites. The South Sinai Survey and Excavation Project, directed by GM, incorporates...
Taphonomic Interpretation of the Developed Oldowan Site of Garba IV (Melka Kunture, Ethiopia) through a GIS Application
Introduction Melka Kunture is a valley site formed mainly of fluvial sediments, extending for over 5 km along the banks of the Awash (FIGURE 1). Its deposits attain a maximum depth of 100 m, and are interspersed with tuff and cinerite providing...
The Innocents and the Sceptics: Antiquity and Classical Archaeology. (Special Section)
When I was invited to discuss ANTIQUITY and Classical archaeology, I felt I only had some general impressions to contribute, and they were also largely limited to the last 15 years of the journal, which I had encountered as an undergraduate on the...
The Lepenski Vir Conundrum: Reinterpretation of the Mesolithic and Neolithic Sequences in the Danube Gorges
Introduction The Danube Gorges provide the richest archaeological dataset for the study of the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in southeast Europe: the transformation of complex hunter-gatherers; the first houses and the development of sedentism;...
The Mediterranean World
JOHN C. MCENROE with COSTIS DAVARAS & PHILIP P. BETANCOURT (ed. Philip P. Betancourt & Costis Davaras). The architecture of Pseira (Pseira V). xiii+139 pages, 51 figures, 69 photographs. 2001. Philadelphia (PA): University of Pennsylvania Museum...
The Non-Fraud of the Middle Bronze Age Stone Goddess from Ustica: A Reverse Piltdown Hoax. (News & Notes)
In 1913, Charles Dawson discovered the first of two skulls found in the Piltdown quarry in Sussex, England, skulls of an apparently primitive hominid, an ancestor of man. The Piltdown Man, as he became known, constitutes perhaps the greatest scientific...
The Palaeoindian-Archaic Transition in North America: New Evidence from Texas
The Wilson-Leonard site in Central Texas (FIGURE 1) provides a record of human occupations spanning ~13,500 years (Collins 1998). Between ~9500 and 8250 cal BC (10,000-9500 BP) hunter-gatherers at this site manufactured stemmed projectile points, supported...
The Role of the Panamanian Land Bridge during the Initial Colonization of the Americas. (News & Notes)
Since 1999, an on-going survey project in Panama has succeeded in locating traces of late Pleistocene--early Holocene humans who colonized the Americas. To date, our investigation has focused on three environmental zones found on the Pacific side of...
Trends in Antiquity. (Special Section)
Introduction: style The editorial freedom given to ANTIQUITY by its founder and currently by its Trustees, and illustrated in practice by Caroline Malone, has accompanied a gentle evolution of the style of the journal. The relative stability of...
Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Human Fossils from Moravia and Bohemia (Czech Republic): Some New [sup.14]C Dates. (News & Notes)
Introduction Traditionally, the territories of Moravia and Bohemia (Czech Republic) are considered rich in human fossils from Upper Pleistocene and Early Holocene contexts. However, the fossil lists, as included in the available Catalogues and other...