Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 67, No. 255, June

Accelerator Radiocarbon Dating of Plant-Fibre Binders in Rock Paintings from Northeastern Australia
During the late Holocene, Aboriginal rock painters in north Queensland selected and combined various natural inorganic and organic materials in paint recipes -- possibly to increase the longevity of their paintings. The organic materials make direct...
Active Tectonics and Land-Use Strategies: A Palaeolithic Example from Northwest Greece
Tectonics and human behaviour Humans live at the interface between the solid earth and the unstable atmosphere. The earth appears constant and safe, while the atmosphere is changeable and seems to have the greatest effect on environment. Droughts or...
A Ground-Radar View of Japanese Burial Mounds
Introduction Recently, high-resolution ground impulse radar has been used to help discover foundations of Roman archaeological sites in Britain (Stove & Addyman 1989), to find buried remains of a 16th-century Basque whaling station on the Labrador...
Climatic Changes: New Archaeological Evidence from the Bohemian Karst and Other Areas
A review of the scattered evidence for climate change in Bohemia and its region shows the importance as well as the difficulty of plotting a better history. Newly identified phases, both dry and wet hint at other fluctuations as yet only guessed at....
Investigating Early Agriculture in Central Asia: New Research at Jeitun, Turkmenistan
The existence of a zone of prehistoric agricultural settlement on the piedmont of southern Turkmenia was first brought to the attention of the English-speaking world by the American geologist-turned-archaeologist, Raphael Pumpelly (1908). In 1904 he...
Late Colonization of East Polynesia
The settlement of East Polynesia, a vast region (20 million sq. km), stretching between Hawaii, New Zealand and Easter Island and containing little and scattered land (0.29 million sq. km), raises intriguing questions about prehistoric development of...
Managing the Archaeological Heritage
The need for dynamic management of the archaeological heritage, aptly if somewhat ponderously described as 'a non-renewable cultural resource', was first recognized in the USA in the early 1970s following the passage of the Archaeological and Historic...
Prehistoric Shellfish-Harvesting Strategies: Implications from the Growth Patterns of Soft-Shell Clams (Mya Arenaria)
Shellfish-gathering is the stuff of many a hunter-gatherer economy. It is technically hunting -- the beasties are animals -- but they conveniently sit in the mud and on the rocks ready to be gathered. A new means of studying growth-rings in clam shells...
Preservation and the Academically Viable Sample
To dig, or not to dig, that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrag'd professors, Or to take picks and shovels against our past, And by digs explain it? -- To dig -- explain -- Destroy; and by digging...
Public Awareness and Archaeology: A Task for the Voluntary Sector
Volunteer associations in the field of heritage conservation, and particularly their international platform, the European Forum of Heritage Association, must concentrate on communicating with the general public, to heighten public awareness of the value...
Rock Art and Changing Perceptions of Southern Africa's Past: Ezeljagdspoort Reviewed
Africa 48: 117-34. LEWIS-WILLIAMS, J.D. & T.A. DOWSON. 1988. Signs of all times: entoptic phenomena in Upper Palaeolithic art, Current Anthropology 29: 201-45. 1989a. Images of power: understanding Bushman rock art. Johannesburg: Southern Book...
The Changing Pattern of Archaeological Excavation in England; as Reflected by the Excavation Index
The Excavation Index, a national index of excavations compiled by the Royal Commission, makes it possible to generate some statistics on the changing pattern of English archaeology, as reflected in the number and periods of sites dug. Introduction ...
The Charter for the Protection and Management of the Archaeological Heritage
Introduction It is widely recognized that a knowledge and understanding of the origins and development of human societies is of fundamental importance to humanity in identifying its cultural and social roots. The archaeological heritage constitutes...
The Chumash and the Swordfish
Introduction Evidence of a special relationship of the swordfish, Xiphias gladius, to the Chumash, a coastal and island people of Southern California, is available to us from a number of different sources: linguistic; ethnographic (recorded myths, ceremonial...
The European Convention on the Protection of the Archaeological Heritage
In January 1992, 20 States signed the European Convention on the Protection of the Archaeological Heritage (Revised) which is intended to replace the original Convention of 1969. Signature indicates that States agree on the actual text that was before...
The Management of Change: Archaeology and Planning
Introduction For over a century there have been arrangements in England for the 'scheduling' (i.e. identification for protection) of ancient monuments. Central government consent is required for any works to Scheduled sites or monuments. Essentially...
The Neolithic Timber Hall at Balbridie, Grampian Region, Scotland: The Building, the Date, the Plant Macrofossils
Introduction In the dry summer of 1976, aerial reconnaissance by the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland resulted in the recording of the cropmark of a remarkable timber building on the farm of Balbridie, Banchory-Ternan...
The New European Convention on the Protection of the Archaeological Heritage
During the years of expansion following World War II which culminated in the 1980s, the problems of preserving and maintaining the archaeological heritage became increasingly apparent within the member-states of the Council of Europe. Ancient monuments...
The Origins of the Andaman Islanders: Local Myth and Archaeological Evidence
A place named Wot-a-emi has been associated by the Andaman Islanders with the origins of their ancestors. How does this myth square with archaeological findings? Introduction Since 1984, archaeological investigations in the Andamans have brought to...
To Separate a Centaur: On the Relationship of Archaeology and History in Soviet Tradition
'A combination, my lady, often cancels the best of its elements.' ... 'That would be true, brother, if your head and shoulders were those of a horse, and the rest human.' JOHN UPDIKE The Centaur chapter 1 The argument on the subject matter of archaeology...
Treasure-Hunting in Ireland - Its Rise and Fall
Recent decades have seen remarkable finds of metal objects from Irish soil -- and equally remarkable consequences when some of those objects have surfaced on the open antiquities market. The passing of the National Monuments Act in 1930 reflected the...
US Cultural Resource Management and the ICAHM Charter
Introduction The ICAHM Charter for the Protection and Management of the Archaeological Heritage was developed to serve as an international statement of principles and guidelines relevant to archaeological resources (Lund 1989: 15-17). The need for such...
Wooden Churches and Their Paintings in the Maramures Region of Romania: A Preliminary Study
In Europe the tradition of building in wood, which has roots reaching back into antiquity, is now mostly lost. Wooden architecture does, however, survive in parts of Eastern Europe, particularly in Romania. In addition to their architectural interest,...