Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 75, No. 290, December

African Archaeology Today. (Special Section)
For most archaeologists across the globe, mention of Africa in the context of archaeological research will probably bring to mind the important discoveries of early stone tools and hominid remains in eastern and southern Africa, the spectacular stone-walled...
A Large Area Archaeological Excavation at Cuddie Springs. (News & Notes)
Key-words: megafauna, Cuddle Springs, stone artefacts, environmental change There are three problematic but connected processes during the last 100,000 years of Australian prehistory. These are: the date of initial human settlement; understanding...
A New Dating Sequence for Catalhoyuk
Introduction Catalhoyuk (1) in Central Anatolia is a large Early Neolithic tell site made famous by the work of James Mellaart in the 1960s (Mellaart 1962; 1963; 1964; 1966; 1967; 1998). Mellaart phased Catalhoyuk by levels of buildings and discovered...
A Preclassic Maya Sweatbath at Cuello, Belize. (News & Notes)
The sweatbath, temescalli, literally `steam house', to the Aztecs, and pib na -- `cooking-pit house' -- to the prehispanic Maya, was a noted feature of the ceremonial and social life of prehispanic and colonial Mesoamerica, with a cosmologically liminal...
Bananas and the Archaeology of Buganda. (Special Section)
The Buganda state, which flourished on the northern shores of Lake Victoria from the 17th to the 19th centuries AD, is widely regarded as one of the most significant socio-political developments of the African continent, most notably having featured...
Between Fasting and Feasting: The Literary and Archaeobotanical Evidence for Monastic Diet in Late Antique Egypt
Introduction To date, discussion of monastic diet and agricultural practice in 4th-7th-century AD Egypt has been largely based on surviving literary or papyrological evidence. Yet fundamental questions about how monastic communities developed or...
By Donkey Train to Kufra? -- How Mr Meri Went West. (Special Section)
In 1990, about 30 km southwest of Dakhla oasis, the most remote settlement in Egypt's Western Desert, a hieroglyphic rock inscription was discovered that turned out to be the first clear evidence of an Ancient Egyptian presence so far into the Sahara...
Cultural Resource Management and Africanist Archaeology. (Special Section)
Introduction Among the general public, the extraordinarily important role played by cultural resource management (hereafter CRM) procedures in the conservation of archaeological materials usually goes unrecognized. Popular images of the swashbuckling...
Dating Shuidonggou and the Upper Palaeolithic Blade Industry in North China
Introduction Shuidonggou, located in North China ~10 km east of the Yellow River on the margins of the Ordos Desert (FIGURE 1), was first identified and excavated by Emile Licent and Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in 1923 (Licent & Teilhard de Chardin...
Diversity in Mastic-Mounted Stone Adzes and the Use of Mastic in Precolonial South Africa: Evidence from Steenbokfontein Cave. (Special Section)
Introduction Composite tools and hailed tools were used world-wide over the last 35,000 years, and possibly earlier than that (Boeda et al. 1996; Holdaway 1996). Evidence for the use of composite tools in South Africa is provided by a small number...
Editorial
`In the name of God and Profit' was the inscription on the ledgers of Franceso di Marco Datini, the Merchant of Prato (Origo 1979). To what extent should this epithet be inscribed on the accession ledgers of our Great Museums? A formula for success...
Environment and Settlements in the Mid-Holocene Palaeo-Oasis of Wadi Tanezzuft (Libyan Sahara). (Special Section)
Introduction Past research in the Acacus mountains has been mostly concerned with studies of rock art (Mori 1965) and site-oriented investigations, particularly rock-shelters in the central and northern Acacus (Uan Muhuggiag: Mori 1965; Barich 1987;...
Geophysical and Palynological Investigations of the Tell El Dabaa Archaeological Site, Nile Delta, Egypt
Introduction The site of Tell El Dabaa, located in the northeastern Nile Delta (FIGURE 1), has been known since 1885. This part of the Nile Delta is generally characterized by a low alluvial plain with southwest-northeast trending belts of higher...
Knobbed Spearbutts of the British and Irish Iron Age: New Examples and New Thoughts. (News & Notes)
Introduction Knobbed spearbutts have an important place in British and Irish Iron Age archaeology. They are seen as being part of the second largest category of La Tene finds in Ireland (Mallory 1992, 138; Raftery 1982, 75) and the most extensive...
Late Pliocene Oldowan Excavations at Kanjera South, Kenya. (Special Section)
The appearance of Oldowan sites c. 2.5 million years ago signals one of the most important adaptive shifts in human evolution. Large mammal butchery, stone artefact manufacture and novel transport and discard behaviours led to the accumulation of the...
More Time Please. (Response)
This further comment on Geoffrey Wainwright's retrospective `Time please' (ANTIQUITY 74: (2000): 909-43) is written from the perspective of someone who has been actively involved in professional archaeology since the creation of the first county `units'...
Nakovana Cave: An Illyrian Ritual Site. (News & Notes)
Nakovana Cave overlooks the Adriatic Sea from just below the crest of a high ridge near the strategically important western tip of the Peljesac peninsula, some 100 km north of Dubrovnik on Croatia's Dalmatian coast. A test trench, excavated at the...
New AMS Radiocarbon Dates for the North Ferriby Boats-A Contribution to Dating Prehistoric Seafaring in Northwestern Europe
Introduction The Ferriby boats (F1, F2 and F3) were discovered on the Humber foreshore between 1937 and 1963 (Wright & Wright 1939; Wright 1990; FIGURES 1 & 2). All three boats have been dated to the Bronze Age and are similar in design:...
`Olmec Blue' and Formative Jade Sources: New Discoveries in Guatemala. (News & Notes)
The discovery of jadeite rocks (jadeitites) in Guatemala in 1954 led to the recognition of the Motagua River Valley as a Maya jade source. While abundant and accessible, what is produced today for the tourist trade, mainly between Estancia de La Virgen...
Prehistoric Agricultural Fields and Water Management Technology of the Safford Valley, Southeastern Arizona. (News & Notes)
On-going archaeological survey in the Safford Valley of southeastern Arizona has revealed an extensive, well-preserved complex of prehistoric agricultural fields and water management features exhibiting sophisticated technological accomplishments (Neely...
Rescue Archaeology in Eastern Cameroon. (Special Section)
Many infrastructural development projects are now being carried out in Cameroon (e.g. road building, oil pipeline construction, and urban renewal). At present, no specific data base exists to determine the current and potential extent of damage to...
Research into the Formlings in the Rock Art of Zimbabwe. (Special Section)
In 1929, commenting on southern Africa's rock art, Leo Frobenius remarked: `... oddities occur which are completely outside our understanding. There are large forms, shaped like galls or livers, into which human figures are painted ...' (1929: 333)....
Restless Corpses: `Secondary Burial' in the Babenberg and Habsburg Dynasties
Introduction Distinguishing various formation processes that shape the state of burials is a major challenge for archaeologists. One such process is secondary burial. In many archaeological reports the term is loosely applied to burials where corpses...
Rock Art in Sub-Saharan Mali. (Special Section)
Sub-Saharan West Africa has remained largely a blank space on the world rock-art map, in spite of a steady trickle of reports during the past century on pictograph and petroglyph sites in the West African sahel and savanna belts. It seems that the...
Roman Vineyards in Britain: Stratigraphic and Palynological Data from Wollaston in the Nene Valley, England
Introduction There has long been uncertainty as to the status of viticulture in Roman Britain. The progressive extension of the domesticated vine is well attested in Gaul and Germany, where from initial beginnings in the south (the vine appears...
Soil Erosion, Iron Smelting and Human Settlement in the Haubi Basin, North-Central Tanzania. (Special Section)
The Haubi Basin, situated in the Irangi Hills of Kondoa District, Dodoma Region, Tanzania (FIGURE 1), exhibits some of the most extreme examples of erosion and associated sedimentation in the region (Christiansson 1981; Payton et al. 1992) (FIGURE...
The Dia Archaeological Project: Rescuing Cultural Heritage in the Inland Niger Delta (Mali). (Special Section)
Introduction Mali is a country with a rich history and diverse cultures. Its cultural heritage is, however, threatened by both the pillage of archaeological sites and illicit trade (ICOM 1995; Bedaux & Rowlands, this volume). Looting has dramatically...
The Future of Mali's Past
One of the greatest disasters for African archaeology is the systematic plundering of archaeological sites for the antiquities trade (e.g. Schmidt & McIntosh 1996; ICOM 1994). An eloquent proof of this plundering is the beautiful catalogue 'Earth...
The Kintampo Archaeological Research Project (KARP): Academic Collaboration and Field Research in Ghana. (Special Section)
The Kintampo Archaeological Research Project is the first venture conducted under the auspices of the academic collaboration established between the Department of Archaeology, University of Ghana (UG) and the Institute of Archaeology, University College...
Time and the Ancestors: Landscape Survey in the Andrantsay Region of Madagascar. (Special Section)
The landscapes of the central highlands of Madagascar are inhabited by the spirits of the dead as well as by the living. The ancestors are a forceful presence in the everyday world, and the archaeology of the central highlands is intimately entwined...
Ulster and the Indian Ocean? Recent Maritime Archaeological Research on the East African Coast. (Special Section)
In January 2001, a team of researchers from the University of Ulster (Northern Ireland) conducted an innovative maritime archaeology project on the East African coast in partnership with the British Institute in Eastern Africa and the National Museums...
Urban Precursors in the Horn: Early 1st-Millennium BC Communities in Eritrea. (Special Section)
Eritrea fought a war of liberation for three decades between the early 1960s and 1991. While professional research stagnated because of the war, amateur archaeologists provided the sole source of information for ancient material culture in the country...
Why Digital Enhancement of Rock Paintings Works: Rescaling and Saturating Colours
Introduction Rock paintings are found on all continents except Antarctica. Yet rock-art research is faced with a very real problem. Like other items of material culture, it is subject to taphonomic processes and various forms of destruction over...