Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 79, No. 304, June

Alexander Marshack: 1918-2004
Alexander Marshack was America's foremost specialist in Ice Age art, despite being entirely self-taught in that subject. Born in New York City in 1918, he received a Bachelors degree in Journalism from City College there in 1943, and subsequently worked...
A Pragmatic Approach to the Problem of Portable Antiquities: The Experience of England and Wales
All countries have found the need to devise a system of protection for objects of archaeological, historical or cultural importance found in their territory by members of the public by chance--what we will call here 'portable antiquities'. These approaches...
Buddhism, Pax Kushana and Greco-Roman Motifs: Pattern and Purpose in Gandharan Iconography
Introduction I see the shadows which show that the sun must have distorted local colour, I saw the lackeys announce the king, but I do not see the sun, I do not see the king. --Paul Gauguin, 1900 The present Afghan and Pakistan landscape of...
Dating the Geometric Nasca Lines in the Peruvian Desert
Introduction The patterns of stone lines located between Nasca and Palpa, Peru (Figure 1) form geometric and biomorphic geoglyphs spread over an area of several hundred square kilometres of desert surface. The geometric examples occur as long straight...
Decolonising the Museum: The National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC
The development of national institutions such as museums and art galleries coincided with the emergence of colonialism and imperialism, and consequently such institutions were saturated with notions of racial difference and human classification popular...
Direct Radiocarbon Dating of Megalithic Paints from North-West Iberia
On the Iberian Peninsula, post-Palaeolithic paintings--in contrast with Palaeolithic images-have received scant attention from the AMS radiometric technique. In fact, only one radiocarbon date consistent with generally expected values has been previously...
Early Holocene Shell Fish Hooks from Lene Hara Cave, East Timor Establish Complex Fishing Technology Was in Use in Island South East Asia Five Thousand Years before Austronesian Settlement
Investigations at Lene Hara Cave In a previous report for Antiquity (O'Connor et al. 2002a) the authors outlined the preliminary excavation and radiocarbon results from Lene Hara Cave, East Timor (Figure 1). These results were significant as they...
Editorial
'The trouble with archaeology' remarked (Lord) Rupert Redesdale at a recent gathering of British academics (at the British Academy) 'is that it has no product'. Without a product, it is difficult to assign the activity a social value or an effective...
Food of the Gods or Mere Mortals? Hallucinogenic Spondylus and Its Interpretive Implications for Early Andean Society
Introduction For millennia, Spondylus, commonly referred to as the 'thorny oyster', has played a significant role in elite and ritual activity of a number of New World cultures. In pre-Columbian times, these molluscs were highly valued by Andean...
From 'Desert Castle' to Medieval Town: Qasr Al-Hayr Al-Sharqi (Syria)
Introduction Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi is one of the so-called Umayyad 'desert castles', a term applied to a series of fortified sites belonging to the early period of Islam but recovering different realities (Finster & Schmidt 2005). It certainly...
Genealogy in the Ground: Observations of Jar Burials of the Yayoi Period, Northern Kyushu, Japan
Introduction The Yayoi period of Japan witnessed the adoption of rice paddy field agriculture (e.g. Immamura 1996: 128-37; Mizoguchi 2002:116-34). The sophisticated socio-technological complex related to rice cultivation is most likely to have been...
Peaceful Harappans? Reviewing the Evidence for the Absence of Warfare in the Indus Civilisation of North-West India and Pakistan (C. 2500-1900 BC)
Introduction The mature phase of the Harappan Civilisation, centred on the River Indus (Figure 1), has been characterised as having rigid urban planning, standardised systems of seals and weights, striking cultural uniformity over a vast area, and...
Risk and Marginality at High Altitudes: New Interpretations from Fieldwork on the Faravel Plateau, Hautes-Alpes
Introduction This paper summarises a sequence of settlement over nine millennia at high altitude in the French Alps. Such regions are often considered marginal and the possibilities of living there must have been determined by climate and the consequent...
The First Modern Humans in Europe? A Closer Look at the Dating Evidence from the Swabian Jura (Germany)
Introduction With its age of 34 000-36 000 [sup.14.C] years BP, the recently discovered human mandible at Pestera cu Oase in south-western Romania constitutes the earliest 'modern' human thus far known from the European Palaeolithic (Trinkaus et...
The Origin of 'Desert Castles': Qasr Bani Muqatil, near Karbala, Iraq
Introduction The so-called 'desert castles' still constitute one of the continuing puzzles of Islamic archaeology today. They appear during the eighth century over the area of the Near East dominated by Umayyad dynasties in what is now Jordan, Palestine,...
The Rural Landscape of Jordan in the Seventh-Nineteenth Centuries AD: The Kerak Plateau
Introduction The archaeological story of the rural landscape in Jordan has often been portrayed as opposition between the nomad (Bedu) and farmer (fellah), between the 'Desert' and the 'Sown'. In fact, current historical and anthropological research...
The Umayyad Congregational Mosque of Jarash in Jordan and Its Relationship to Early Mosques
Introduction Mosques constitute one of the principal defining features of urban life in Islam (Grabar 1973: Chapter 5; Frishman & Khan 1994; Hillenbrand 1999b: Chapter II; Insoll 1999; see also Johns 1999 for a critical assessment of the origin...
Wings over Armenia: Use of a Paramotor for Archaeological Aerial Survey
Origins and problems In May 2000, Professor Hayk Hakobyan of the Institute of Archaeology in Yerevan contacted the Aerial Archaeology Research Group (http://aarg.univie.ac.at) asking for help to establish aerial survey in Armenia. After locating...
Woodland Clearance in the Mesolithic: The Social Aspects
Introduction--clearings and food procurement Since the pioneering work of Smith (1970) it has been increasingly recognised that Mesolithic populations had an impact upon their surroundings. In the UK most of the evidence is palaeoecological, in...