Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 68, No. 258, March

Acorn Eating and Agricultural Origins: California Ethnographies as Analogies for the Ancient near East
Since cereals and legumes were successful domesticates, archaeologists and botanists have investigated early domestication with particular emphasis on these plants. What about other foods, which may have been staples in their own time, for which we have...
Anthropomorphic Figurines from the North Caucasus
A report on human representations in cast bronze and terracotta from a Late Bronze Age cemetery near Grozni in the Checken region of the northwest Caucasus. The brilliant culture of the Late Bronze Age in the north Caucasian region is well known from...
A Pyre and Grave Goods in British Cremation Burials; Have We Missed Something?
There is more to a cremation than the human bone -- turned white and blue-grey by the fire, enough to fill a fair-sized hat -- because so much may go on the pyre with the corpse. For many years cremation burials have been the 'poor relation' of British...
A Taphonomy of Palaeoart
As one digs back through the archaeological record, art and other evidence of symbolic behaviour becomes scarcer, so it is much disputed just when human marking behaviour and human language began. Is the fading away a real fact of prehistory, or a distorting...
Birds of the Grotte Cosquer: The Great Auk and Palaeolithic Prehistory
Striking among the figures of the Grotte Cosquer, the Palaeolithic painted cave newly discovered in Mediterranean France, are some waterbirds. They are identified as Great Auks, the great and extinct 'penguin' of the northern ocean. In discussing the...
Destruction of a Common Heritage: The Archaeology of War in Croatia, Bosnia and Hercegovina
The civil war in the former Yugoslavia, the largest conflict in Europe for half a century, is more than incidentally about objects from the past and proofs of past possession. Here is a report on some of the specifics and some of the generalities. A...
Direct Dating of Rock Art at Laurie Creek (NT), Australia: A Reply to Nelson
D.E. Nelson (1993), in the last ANTIQUITY, declared doubts about an old date for rock art in northern Australia we published in 1990. T.H. Loy, another co-author of the original paper, confirms his continuing confidence in the determination. Accelerator...
DNA in Charred Wheat Grains from the Iron Age Hillfort at Danebury, England
The genetic history of wheat is the story of the world's temperate staple food. Archaeologically, charred grains are the common way wheat is preserved. Study of burnt spelt wheat from the British Iron Age shows DNA is present, and begins to shows the...
Pharaonic Quarrying and Mining: Settlement and Procurement in Egypt's Marginal Regions
Across the rocky landscapes of Egypt lies evidence for pharaonic quarrying and mining; fresh fieldwork at neglected sites, such as the Hatnub travertine quarries and the Wadi el-Hudi amethyst mines, now tells us more. The surviving remains of quarrying...
Preliminary Investigation of the Plant Macro-Remains from Dolni Vestonice II, and Its Implications for the Role of Plant Foods in Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Europe
For the most part the Pleistocene, and even the earliest post-glacial, is a blank when it comes to evidence of humans eating plants. No wonder the old men's stories, of chaps who hunt great mammals and eat their meat, still dominate our unthinking visions...
'Running Ahead of Time' in the Development of Palaeolithic Industries
Palaeolithic people could foresee their technological future no more, or even less, than we are able to. They never said, 'The Middle Palaeolithic has gone on quite long enough -- now we'd better get on with a transition to the Upper.' So what is one...
Static Scenes at the Globe and the Rose Elizabethan Theaters
In 1989, we reported the state of affairs at the Rose, and in 1992 at the Globe, the two Elizabethan theatres in London which survive archaeologically. They are the unique remnants of a unique and uniquely valued kind of building, Shakespeare's workplaces....
Technological Organization and Settlement in Southwest Tasmania after the Glacial Maximum
A growing quantity of data about the late Pleistocene sequence in Tasmania has not been matched by an equivalent clear understanding of just what are the patterns of its lithic record. A new model is developed. Introduction The discovery over the last...
The Archaeology of the Phuthiatsana-Ea-Thaba Bosiu Basin, Lesotho, Southern Africa: Changes in Later Stone Age Regional Demography
Field survey of an unexplored zone of southern Africa enlarges and develops knowledge of the region's prehistory. Introduction Despite earlier projects in other parts of the country (Carter 1978; Parkington et al. 1987) and the sporadic interest of...
The Chronology of the Introduction of Pastoralism to the Cape, South Africa
A careful survey of reports of early sheep in southernmost Africa combines with new radiocarbon dates to revise our knowledge of early pastoralism in the Cape. The new chronology shows the keeping of domestic stock and the making of pottery are not simultaneous...
The Iceman Reviewed
Two-and-a-half years ago, in September 1991, a mummified body was discovered in a high snowfield on the Italian-Austrian border. It dates to about 3200 BC. Several sources and accounts, mostly in German, now exist of 'Otzi the Iceman', but there is no...
The Territory of Ritual: Cross-Ridge Boundaries and the Prehistoric Landscape of the Cleveland Hills, Northeast England
On the North Yorkshire Moors, in northeast England, is a series of linear boundaries which are characteristically placed across upland spurs and promontories. Survey and excavation suggest that these boundaries operated in conjunction with natural features...