Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 71, No. 273, September

'Always Momentary, Fluid and Flexible': Towards a Reflexive Excavation Methodology
Although processual and postprocessual archaeologists conceive of 'data' in different ways (Patrik 1985), there has been little discussion of a postprocessual methodology (but see Carver 1989; Tilley 1989). This is understandable; any notion of a general...
Archaeology and Archaeometry: From Casual Dating to a Meaningful Relationship?
The 1981 Brookhaven round table Future Directions in Archaeometry saw archaeologists and archaeometrists engage in pointed criticism of each other (Olin 1982). Frank Hole's contribution ('Finding problems for all the solutions') expressed the feeling...
Bronze Age Myths? Volcanic Activity and Human Response in the Mediterranean and North Atlantic Regions
A search for precision beyond that currently available is a frequent aspect of archaeological interpretation. Tensions exist as a result of the need to resolve events on a human time-scale using techniques often incapable of producing such accuracy or...
Charlemagne's Black Stones: The Re-Use of Roman Columns in Early Medieval Europe
One of the most important documents bearing on Carolingian trade is a letter written by Charlemagne to King Offa of Mercia, apparently shortly after the death of Pope Hadrian I in AD 796. He discusses the problem of merchants fraudulently posing as pilgrims...
Contradictions in Lapita Pottery, a Composite Clone
Like the cultures of Neolithic Europe -- `Glockenbecherkultur', `Trichterbecherkultur', `Linienbandkeramik' -- the `Lapita culture' of the western Pacific is defined by its distinctive ceramics. What that `ceramic culture' amounts to in human terms has...
Editorial
An unkind (as I felt) correspondent - when I remarked in an editorial on the standing archaeology of the Second World War, as still concretely visible on the Normany beaches - told me that the Editor's holidays are none of ANTIQUITY readers' business...
Fish Trade in Norse Orkney and Caithness: A Zooarchaeological Approach
The trade of dried fish played an important role in the transformation from the Viking Age to the Middle Ages in Scandinavian polities such as Arctic Norway. This paper develops zooarchaeological methods to investigate whether similar processes occurred...
Healthy but Mortal: Human Biology and the First Farmers of Western Europe
What do we know about the effects of the transition to agriculture on human biology? A literature has grown up that gives us the impression that we know a great deal about what happened to bones and teeth when people became sedentary farmers. A review...
Human Skeletal Remains from Tomb 1, Sipan (Lambayeque River Valley, Peru); and Their Social Implications
Introduction In late 1987 and early 1988, an archaeological team led by Walter Alva, Director of the Bruning Archaeological Museum, excavated the first of a series of high-status Moche tombs at the site of Sipan (Huaca Rajada), in the central Lambayeque...
Intentional Tooth Removal in Neolithic Italian Women
Cultural modification of the teeth is a widespread, often florid phenomenon, with the highly visible front teeth most commonly furnishing the canvas for dental self-expression. Native peoples of Mesoamerica and South America inlaid the incisors, sometimes...
Ireland's Discovery Programme: Progress and Prospects
Imagine a group of British archaeologists being invited by the Prime Minister to spend a large annual sum of money on archaeological research and provided with rooms at 10 Downing Street for that worthy purpose. This was the extraordinary situation which...
Lapita and the Temporal Geography of Prehistory
Ambrose (this issue, above) and Sand (this issue, above) reported on Lapita in the specific, without being parochial in their concerns. This paper looks at the largest Lapita picture, but is itself in turn based on new reports in the specific, here from...
Late Pleistocene/early Holocene Tropical Forest Occupations at San Isidro and Pena Roja, Colombia
Northern South America is not a homogeneous geographical area. The Ecuadorian Andes form a continuous, although diverse, mountain chain (with high inner valleys, jalcas and paramos), flanked in both sides by lowlands covered with rain forests. In southwestern...
Monte Verde and the Antiquity of Humankind in the Americas
Monte Verde and the peopling of the New World The problem of the timing and mechanism(s) by which the New World was initially peopled has remained intractable despite at least 70 years of intensive archaeological research and several apparent resolutions...
Rock-Art Image in Fern Cave, Lava Beds National Monument, California: Not the AD 1054 (Crab Nebula) Supernova
On 4 July AD 1054 a supernova brighter than Venus appeared in the sky, remaining visible for approximately 23 days and 650 nights. It was chronicled in five independent historic accounts, four from China and one from Japan (Duyvenduk 1942). Hubble (1928)...
Spinning or Sailing?: The Boat Models from Eridu
A sceptical view of received wisdom is much to be encouraged, and in that sense we welcome Thomas Strasser's reinterpretation, in the December ANTIQUITY, of the so-called boat models from Eridu. There are, however, strong arguments for rejecting his...
The Chronology of Lapita Ware in New Caledonia
The ware known by the name of Lapita is a lowfired pottery with distinctive geometric dentate-stamped decorations and complex shapes, found in archaeological sites from the Bismarck Archipelago (northeast of New Guinea) to western Polynesia. It is the...
The Mildenhall Treasure: A First-Hand Account
Perhaps the most fascinating problem, which I ever shared with Gordon [Fowler], was that of the Mildenhall treasure. He rang me up one evening in June, 1946, and asked if I had seen the paper. Of course I had not looked at it and asked what was in it....
The North-Central Cultural Dichotomy on the Northwest Coast of North America: Its Evolution as Suggested by Wet-Site Basketry and Wooden Fish Hooks
Introduction: the North-Central Northwest Coast cultural dichotomy For some time researchers on the Northwest Coast of North America have noted a North-Central Coast cultural dichotomy, distinguishing the northern Tlingit-Haida-Tsimshian 'co-traditions'...
The Site of Saar: Dilmun Reconsidered
Geoffrey Bibby went to the Arabian Gulf 'looking for Dilmun' in the 1950s and '60s as part of a Danish team led initially by Professor Glob. For 20 years after this little archaeological research took place. In the 1980s the picture changed again; much...