Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 72, No. 275, March

A Contextual Approach to the Interpretation of the Early Bronze Age Skeletons of the East Anglian Fens
The fenland peats of eastern England have produced some 36 prehistoric burials, whose distinctive associations place them into the early Bronze Age - just sufficient for pattern to be evident in their placing and character. Background In the Fenland...
A High-Status Anglo-Saxon Settlement at Flixborough, Lincolnshire
Excavations at Flixborough, Lincolnshire (1989-91) revealed an important Anglo-Saxon settlement. Here the various interpretations are discussed, ranging from monastic to 'magnate'. Between 1989 and 1991, excavations at Flixborough on the south bank...
A Middle Palaeolithic Origin of Music? Using Cave-Bear Bone Accumulations to Assess the Divje Babe I Bone 'Flute.'
The discovery of a perforated cave-bear femur from the Neanderthal levels at Divje Babe has been interpreted as the oldest musical instrument in Europe. Here we present the current discussion on the 'flute' and its implications for other similar bone...
A Settlement Pattern Study in Northeast China: Results and Potential Contributions of Western Theory and Methods to Chinese Archaeology
Chinese scholarship well illustrates how research attitudes direct the spirit of research, and the tenor of the archaeological story which results. What happens when non-Chinese theory, approaches and field methods are brought to bear in a Chinese regional...
Celts, Politics and Motivation in Archaeology
Ruth & Vincent Megaw questioned the motivation behind the current critique of the use of the term 'Celtic' for the La Tene Iron Age in ANTIQUITY (1996:175-81). They explained it is a nationalist reaction derived from insecurity about modern English...
Eating Horses: The Evolutionary Significance of Hippophagy
The meat and milk of horses are highly valued food products, past and present. Horses were an especially valuable food resource in grassland habitats, which may explain their increased exploitation in the central Eurasian forest steppe during the late...
Editorial
It is a daunting task to write our first Editorial, following in the footsteps of three remarkable Editors of ANTIQUITY. There is certainly much to report, not only of what is in this issue, and of present events and matters, but also of past and future....
Headroom and Human Trampling: Cave Ceiling-Height Determines the Spatial Patterning of Stone Artefacts at Petzkes Cave, Northern New South Wales
Going into a cave or shelter, one walks where one can stand upright or has to crouch less. That affects which zones objects are trampled on, which zones they may be kicked out of, which zones they may be kicked into. And those effects interact with the...
Human Occupation at Jinmium, Northern Australia: 116,000 Years Ago or Much Less?
The rock-shelter of Jinmium in the Northern Territory of Australia hit the headlines a year-and-a-half ago when TL dates suggested human occupation might date from 116,000 years ago. Such dates were much earlier than any previously obtained for Australia,...
Imaging and Imagining the Neanderthal: The Role of Technical Drawings in Archaeology
Reconstruction drawings intended to illustrate the realities of prehistoric life can be fatuously revealing of preconceptions in the minds of the modern illustrator and of the researcher who briefs the illustrator. But are the less interpretative drawings...
Knowth before Knowth
Recent research at the great Irish passage tomb of Knowth has revealed new decorated stones, which were apparently recycled from an earlier tomb. Here, George Eogan describes the finds and discusses the implication of an early phase of tomb building...
Megamarsupial Extinction: The Carrying Capacity Argument
An ancient and contentious debate in prehistory (Owen 1846; Lyell 1863) asks if the megafauna of newly colonized worlds was exterminated by human hunting, or whether other factors, such as changing climate, were decisive. Debate on this issue remains...
Middle and Upper Palaeolithic Environments and the Calibration of 14C Dates beyond 10,000 BP
Advances in our understanding of the Quaternary history of the earth's magnetic field provide the means to correct the radiocarbon time-scale for long-term (millennia) deviations from the calendrical one beyond the upper limit of the tree-ring-based...
Pleistocene Settlement in the Australian Arid Zone: Occupation of an Inland Riverine Landscape in the Central Australian Ranges
Recent excavations at the Kulpi Mara Rockshelter in the Palmer River catchment of central Australia have produced radiocarbon determinations spanning an archaeological sequence of 30,000 years. These results enable re-assessment of models addressing...
Prehistoric Land Degradation in Hungary: Who, How and Why?
The recent study of Kis-Mohos To lake in Hungary reveals an important sequence of prehistoric landscape changes from the earliest land clearance to the early Middle Ages. The recognition of land degradation, through the application of new analytical...
Some Observations on the Radiocarbon and Cosmogenic Isotope Dating of Petroglyphs, Foz Coa, Portugal
Further remarks on the age of the Foz Coa rock-engravings, Portugal, in the light of studies by absolute-science methods in the March 1997 ANTIQUITY. In the March 1997 issue of ANTIQUITY, two articles by Fred Phillips et al. (1997: 100-104) and Ron...
Stable Isotopes and the Seasonality of the Oronsay Middens
Research on six late Mesolithic shell middens on the small Hebridean island of Oransay address questions of permanent and seasonal occupation. Stable isotope analysis of human bones shows murine resources providing the majority of protein, supporting...
The Mesolithic-Neolithic Transition in Ukraine: New Radiocarbon Determinations for the Cemeteries of the Dnieper Rapids Region
Large Mesolithic and Neolithic cemeteries that span the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition are scarce in Europe. As such, understanding the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition is rarely easy when using the direct evidence from carbon-dating of human remains....
Two 'Oldowan' Assemblages in the Plio-Pleistocene Deposits of the Orce Region, Southeast Spain
Stone artefacts reported from the Orce region (Grenada, Spain) indicate a first human presence in western Europe as early as the Plio-Pleistocene boundary, making a 'long chronology' for European hominids against the claims for a briefer human presence....
Unpeeling Pompeii
Pompeii, recovered from under Vesuvius ash, offers a famous 'frozen moment' in archaeological time: a city us it stood at a certain day. Beyond and beneath the dating evidence visible in its standing buildings is to be found a more archaeological chronology....
Whose Rationality? A Response to Fekri Hassan
In December 1997 we published Fekri Hassan's comments on Ian Hodder's 'Reflexive excavation methods' (ANTIQUITY 71: 1020-25). Ian Hodder responds here to the criticisms and defends his position. In the context of discussing the need to bring 'unity...
Why Study a Greek Vase-Painter? - A Response to Whitley's 'Beazley as Theorist.' (J. Whitley, Antiquity, Vol 72, Mar 1997, P 40)
John Oakley defends the legacy of Beazley in response to James Whitley's recent analysis of Beazley and his followers (ANTIQUITY 72: 40-47). The debate demonstrates how influential some past figures of archaeological methodology still are, and how diverse...