Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 73, No. 279, March

A Later Bronze Age Shield from South Cadbury, Somerset, England
Introduction (JMC) Readers of ANTIQUITY will be familiar with most of the features of Later Bronze Age Europe -hillforts, urnfields, metalwork and the like. Museums throughout Europe are full of bronzes, and weaponry figures large in most displays;...
Archaeological Theory in France and Britain
British archaeologists have long been puzzled by the contrast between the way in which the theoretical underpinnings of the discipline are discussed and explored on the French side of the Channel. Theory might be considered one of the most significant...
Archaeology and Ideological Propaganda in Annexed Alsace (1940-1944)
In June 1940, following the signature of the Rethondes armistice, the French province of Alsace was joined to Germany and integrated with the neighbouring German province of Baden, into the Ga u Baden-Elsass, later known as Gau Oberrhein.(1) A period...
Distance and Decay: An Uneasy Relationship
Stone, and particularly stone which can be used in the manufacture of flaked stone artefacts, is not uniformly distributed over the face of the earth. Users of stone tools have frequently been faced with the necessity of transporting stone from the...
Ethnicity, Culture and Identity: French Archaeologists and Historians
The state of French archaeological theory has been recently covered by two French-authored papers in English (Audouze & Leroi-Gourhan 1981; Cleuziou et al. 1991). These articles emphasize the weight of national tradition and demonstrate the unique...
Excavations at Dun Vulan: A Correction
In writing any paper one always hopes to inspire debate. We should, then, be flattered that Gilmour & Cook were motivated to offer a long and detailed critique of our recent ANTIQUITY article on brochs (Parker Pearson et al. 1996; Gilmour &...
Gibraltar Neanderthals and Results of Recent Excavations in Gorham's, Vanguard and Ibex Caves
Introduction and background Last year marked the 150th anniversary of the accidental discovery of the 'Gibraltar skull' [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED], blasted out during work at Forbes' Quarry, below the North Face of the Rock (Busk 1865)....
Investigations on the Evolution of Subsistence Economy in the Qazvin Plain (Iran) from the Neolithic to the Iron Age
This paper aims to present some of the results of research on the palaeodiet of prehistoric people in the Qazvin Plain within the last five millennia. Archaeological faunal remains used for this study originate from three sites in the Bu'in-Zahra microregion...
Is Archaeological Valuation an Accounting Matter?
This paper aims to combine two major current developments in the field of international archaeological resource management (ARM). The first - which can broadly be described as 'practical' - concerns the requirement imposed upon non-profit public museums...
Is Post-Processualism Bound to Happen Everywhere? the French Case
It may seem surprising that post-processual archaeology has not had any impact in France, given that much of its vocabulary has been borrowed from French intellectuals. The answer is not archaeological. It does not lie in the events of the last 20...
Lead Isotope Analyses from Tell Abraq, United Arab Emirates: New Data regarding the 'Tin Problem' in Western Asia
The subject of this article is the evidence for the earliest use and trade of tin and bronze(1) in Western Asia. The article begins with an outline of the 'tin problem', followed by an overview of recent archaeometric research programs of importance...
Muck 'N' Molecules: Organic Geochemical Methods for Detecting Ancient Manuring
Biomolecular indicators of manuring In a recent communication entitled 'The beginnings of manuring in western Europe', Bakels (1997) stated 'that the arable soil of former fields has undergone changes that have totally obliterated the soil's original...
New Advances in French Prehistory
Introduction The study of technology is long-standing in France, with its roots in the Enlightenment. Since then, French technological studies have exhibited divergent characteristics: a search for universal principles and a deep interest in the...
Questions of Epistemology and a Working Hypothesis about Engravings of the 5th Millennium in Western France
'When Mr Renaud, of Auray, during his 1811 excavation at the dolmen des Marchands in Lockmariaker, discovered engraved, previously unknown, characters, he made a discovery which none has effaced, in the prehistoric science of our western regions, that...
Radiocarbon Calibration for the Middle/Upper Paleolithic: A Comment
Holocene period 14C dates can be calibrated by means of dendrochronology (Stuiver et al. 1993). At present, the tree-ring curve based on absolutely dated trees and a matched floating German pine chronology (Kromer & Spurk 1998), and a new recommended...
Radiocarbon Dating: Avoiding Errors by Avoiding Mixed Samples
Introduction Time-depth makes archaeology special in studies of human societies, and the chronologies provided by radiocarbon, with all their faults, are crucial to the interpretation of evidence about past ways of life (Taylor 1987; Baillie 1990;...
The Archaeology of Dian: Trends and Tradition
Beginning with the excavation of the necropolis of Shizhaishan during the late 1950s, sustained fieldwork in the province of Yunnan in southwest China has led to the identification of a Bronze Age archaeological culture - usually named 'Dian' - said...
The Chaos of Collapse: Disintegration and Reintegration of Inter-Regional Systems
Large, inter-regional organizational systems which integrate multiple areas, and possibly ethnic groups through ritual, political and economic cooperation are relatively common in prehistory. The collapse of these systems may come about for a variety...
The Congress of Anthropology and Archaeology in Copenhagen 1869 - Behind the Stage
Introduction From the beginning, prehistoric archaeology in Denmark was aimed at an international forum and the Danish archaeologist worked in international languages. But, as a consequence of the national-political situation after a war with...
The 'Kilnsea-Boat', and Some Implications from the Discovery of England's Oldest Plank Boat Remains
Introduction A plank found by members of the Hull Natural History Society in September 1996 on the Kilnsea beach in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED] has been identified as a piece of a prehistoric boat. It...
The Origins of French Archaeology
In contemporary scientific research, the most marked result of the last 30 years has been the development of a specifically American science and its emancipation from the old European intellectual heritage of the 19th century and the interwar period....
V. Gordon Childe and the Vocabulary of Revolutionary Change
Introduction Some publications have an extraordinary influence beyond their immediate subject area, irrespective of their changing status within academic history and archaeology, if they contain ideas or terminology that can be seized upon in general...