Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 81, No. 313, September

Compound-Specific Stable Carbon Isotopic Detection of Pig Product Processing in British Late Neolithic Pottery
By extracting lipids from potsherds and determining the [[delta][sup.13.C]] of the most abundant fatty acids, degraded fats from ruminant animals, such as cattle, and non-ruminant animals, such as pigs, can be distinguished. The authors use this phenomenon...
Dating the Neolithic of South India: New Radiometric Evidence for Key Economic, Social and Ritual Transformations
The Neolithic period in South India is known for its ashmounds, superseded (in its Iron Age) by megalith builders with craft specialisation. Thanks to a major radiocarbon dating programme and Bayesian analysis of the dates, the authors have placed...
Defining a Culture: The Meaning of Hanseatic in Medieval Turku
This paper explores the influence of merchants operating out of Germany in medieval Turku by comparing the evidence of documentary reports and the quantity and distribution of imported pottery. The documents make it clear that German merchants were...
Digital Infra-Red Photography for Recording Painted Rock Art
Here is a new application of infra-red photography with a digital camera to record rock art. The need to make full and accurate records of the images, without touching (and thus degrading) the rock, requires a method of remote mapping. Trials with...
Early Domesticated Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata) from Central Ghana
From examining the remains of charred cowpeas from rock shelters in Central Ghana, the authors throw light on the subsistence strategies of the Kintampo people of the second millennium BCE. Perhaps driven southwards from the Sahel by aridiflcation,...
Early Mesopotamian Urbanism: A New View from the North
For many years, the southern Mesopotamia of Ur and Uruk, ancient Sumer, has been seen as the origin centre of civilisation and cities: The urban implosion of late-fourth- and early-third-millennium Mesopotamia resulted in a massive population shift...
Editorial
* A sea-girt island with a giant reputation, a once all-conquering cricket team and a bard beloved the world over--I'm talking, of course, about Jamaica, where the World Archaeological Congress 2007 was convened in May by a local committee chaired...
Late Mesolithic Fish Traps from the Liffey Estuary, Dublin, Ireland
An opportunity to investigate in advance of new construction led to the discovery of five Mesolithic hazel fish traps some 6.3m below mean sea level in the River Liffey. Closely paralleled on the continent of Europe they imply a well organised community...
New Evidence from East Timor Contributes to Our Understanding of Earliest Modern Human Colonisation East of the Sunda Shelf
New dates by which modern humans reached East Timor prompts this very useful update of the colonisation of Island Southeast Asia. The author addresses all the difficult questions: why are the dates for modern humans in Australia earlier than they are...
New Perspectives on the Varna Cemetery (Bulgaria)-AMS Dates and Social Implications
The research team of this new project has begun the precision radiocarbon dating of the superimportant Copper Age cemetery at Varna. These first dates show the cemetery in use from 4560-4450 BC, with the possibility that the richer burials are earlier...
Ottoman Bows-An Assessment of Draw Weight, Performance and Tactical Use
The Ottoman fighting bow emerged in Europe from a long eastern tradition of using high velocity projectiles to hunt and fight on horseback. The author compares its performance (favourably) with the longbow and explains how the tactics employed with...
Resisting the Cold in Ice Age Tasmania: Thermal Environment and Settlement Strategies
Humans had reached Tasmania by 35 000 years bp and were in residence at the peak of the last ice age. Curiously, the settlements in the coldest period are concentrated in the highest and most southerly places, and the colder the weather became, the...
Rock Art and Artisans in the Lemro Valley, Arakan, Myanmar
This is a story that will appeal to all scholars involved with the interpretation of rock art. Figures depicted on rock surfaces in jungle terrain patrolled by soldier ants were thought in the nineteenth century to record an otherwise unknown early...
The Age of Stonehenge
Stonehenge is the icon of British prehistory, and continues to inspire ingenious investigations and interpretations. A current campaign of research, being waged by probably the strongest archaeological team ever assembled, is focused not just on the...
The Amazing Dr Kouznetsov
Here is a story to strike a chill of anxiety into the hearts of editors and their peer-reviewers. Do we, should we, need we check our submissions with greater rigour? Keywords: Ireland, conservation, creationism, medieval, textiles, Turin Shroud...
The Place That Caused the Neolithic
Gordon Childe's ideas about conditions in the Near and Middle East directly or indirectly influenced the study of early farming and sedentism the world over. The principle (Childe 1954: 23-4) that social structure and organisation were bent to the...
The State of Theocracy: Defining an Early Medieval Hinterland in Sri Lanka
The ancient Sri Lankan city of Anuradhapura is currently the subject of one of the world's largest and most intensive archaeological research projects. Having traced its growth from an Iron Age village to a medieval city, the research team now moves...
Tools, Space and Behaviour in the Lower Palaeolithic: Discoveries at Soucy in the Paris Basin
We are privileged to publish this interim report on the discovery of open settlement sites of the early Palaeolithic in the Paris basin. The early occupation areas were defined beside the river Yonne at Soucy during gravel-quarrying, which were to...
Urbanism on the Margins: Third Millennium BC Al-Rawda in the Arid Zone of Syria
The Fertile Crescent of the Ancient Near East is well known for its early cities in irrigated farming regions. Here the authors describe the recent discovery and investigation of a planned, circular, mid/late-third millennium BC city beyond the limit...