Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 77, No. 297, September

Also Received
References to reviews of the hardback editions in previous volumes of ANTIQUITY are added in parentheses. GUY DE LA BEDOYERE. Eagles over Britannia: the Roman army in Britain. 256 pages, 122 figures, 32 colour photographs, 4 maps. 2003. Stroud &...
A Measure of Conviction: Recording Emphasis in Scandinavian Rock Carvings
For over a hundred years the rock carvings of north and west Europe have almost always been presented in publications in a single traditional way--as black images on a plain white background. The pattern began with pioneers such as Axel Holmberg (1848)...
Andean Luxury Foods: Special Food for the Ancestors, Deities and the Elite
Introduction Luxury, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. Luxury foods are traditionally identified in archaeology as edibles that are exotic, rare, expensive to procure or restricted from the bulk of the population. But it can be argued...
An Iron Age Chariot Burial from Scotland
Introduction The Scottish Iron Age is not known for its rich burial record: indeed, it is impoverished even by Britain's fairly poor standards. Yet routine rescue excavations in 2001 at Newbridge, just west of Edinburgh (Figure 1), found a completely...
Archaeology under the Judiciary: Ayodhya 2003
Keywords: India, Ayodhya, heritage, politics After more than a decade after its demolition, the December 1992 destruction of the sixteenth-century mosque in Ayodhya remains a powerful heritage issue. The site is considered sacred by Hindus as the...
Dance of the Cranes: Crane Symbolism at Catalhoyuk and Beyond
"Chryse has seen an omen. Cranes are dancers too; everyone knows the crane-dance. We'll be the Cranes. "(Renault 1958:205) Cranes at Catalhoyuk Bird symbolism at Catalhoyuk, for those familiar with the results of the 1960s excavations, is...
Editorial
"I enter the church choked with the cares of the world. The glorious colours attract my sight like a flowering meadow, and the glory of God steals imperceptibly into my soul" St John of Damascus; 8th century A.D. Washington Cathedral,...
Immutable Laws of Friction: Preparing and Fitting Stone Blocks into the Great Pyramid of Giza
Introduction The exact techniques employed by ancient Egyptian craftworkers in the construction of the Great Pyramid of Khufu at Giza during the Fourth Dynasty (c.2649-2513 BC) are still uncertain. Two of the major problems concern the preparation...
Living Lithics: Ethnoarchaeology in Highland Papua New Guinea
Introduction Worked stone is of paramount importance in much prehistoric archaeology as it is frequently the only cultural evidence to survive. For the same reason it often dominates interpretation, with lithics afforded a status that is unlikely...
Monuments in a Flood Zone: "Builders" and "Recipients" in Ancient Varendri, (Eastern India and Bangladesh)
Introduction Anyone who has seen the imposing Buddhist Vihara at Paharpur in Bangladesh is filled with a sense of wonder at this towering eighth--ninth century AD monument rising above the flat Holocene terrain (Figure 1: The surrounding terrain;...
Population Expansion in the Western Pacific (Austronesia): A Wave of Advance Model
The wave of advance model is based on a mathematical formula, which was originally proposed by Fisher (1937) to explain the spread of advantageous genes. It has been applied to the expansion of agriculture in Neolithic Europe, leading to the conclusion...
Prehistory and Its Perception in a Melanesian Archipelago: The New Caledonia Example
Introduction The origins of the populations of the Pacific islands have provided a puzzling question for Westerners ever since the first discovery of the region by European navigators. The Spaniards crossing the waters of Island Melanesia at the...
Settlement and Economy in Neolithic Ukraine: A New Chronology
Defining the Neolithic The question of the origins and subsequent development of food-producing economies in Ukraine in the prehistoric period is comparatively well studied for many cultures such as the Linear pottery, Bug-Dniester, Surska and Dnieper-Donets...
The Egyptian Origin of the Greek Alphabetic Numerals
Introduction Numbers are represented in Greek classical inscriptions in two different ways. The first system, the acrophonic, is so named because the signs used to represent five and multiples of 10 are taken from the first letters of the appropriate...
The Origins of Iron Working in India: New Evidence from the Central Ganga Plain and the Eastern Vindhyas
Introduction The date and origin of the introduction of iron artefacts and iron working into India has remained a controversial research problem, not unconnected with the question of its association with the supposed arrival, in the second millennium...
Wood Charcoal from Santorini (Thera): New Evidence for Climate, Vegetation and Timber Imports in the Aegean Bronze Age
Bronze Age climate in the Aegean Palaeoclimatic reconstructions for the Bronze Age Aegean based on pollen analytical investigations from several sites in mainland Greece (Bottema 1974, 1982, 1990) have suggested climate conditions drier than at...