Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 68, No. 260, September

35,000-Year-Old Sites in the Rainforests of West New Britain, Papua New Guinea
The growing story of early settlement in the northwest Pacific islands is moving from coastal sites into the rainforest. Evidence of Pleistocene cultural layers have been discovered in open-site excavations at Yombon, an area containing shifting hamlets,...
About the Age of the Oldest Passage-Graves in Western Brittany
The acid rocks and soils of northwest France are not kind to preservation of organic material. Radiocarbon dating has mostly depended on charcoal, for want of a better dating medium that survives. In Brittany, Finistere can sometimes contribute to the...
As a Prescription to Rule: The Royal Tomb of Mala'e Lahi and 19th-Century Tongan Kingship
The tangled dynastic history of Tonga, celebrated kingdom of western Polynesia, offers a rare chance to study the place of monumental burial-places in a chieftains' society. Disentangling the story, at a remove of not many centuries, is not a simple...
Beyond the Radiocarbon Barrier in Australian Prehistory
The team that has been dating early Australian sites by luminescence methods replies to Allen's (1994) view of the continent's human chronology, published in the June ANTIQUITY (68: 339-43). They argue the strength of the long chronology with their new...
Contemporaneity of Clactonian and Acheulian Flint Industries at Barnham, Suffolk
New field evidence challenges an old-established fundamental of the Lower Palaeolithic sequence in Britain. Excavations at the Lower Palaeolithic site at East Farm, Barnham, Suffolk (Ashton et al. in press) help to change radically the British Lower...
Cuneiform Inscriptions Made Visible on Bronze Plates from the Upper Anzaf Fortress, Turkey
X-ray study of bronze plates from a fortress of the 1st millennium BC reveals cuneiform inscriptions on metal surfaces that are now wholly hidden by corrosion. The Anzaf fortresses and the bronze hoard The two Anzaf fortresses of the Urartu period...
Early Agriculture in Southeast Asia: Phytolith Evidence from the Bang Pakong Valley, Thailand
Phytoliths -- the microscopic opal silica bodies inside plant tissue that often survive well in archaeological deposits -- are becoming a larger part of the world of human palaeobotany. They give a new view of early rice in southeast Asia. Introduction...
'Forget Piltdown - We've Still Got the Oldest.' (Discovery of the 'Boxgrove Man')
'Boxgrove Man' was one of the sillier fictions of the year. In the unusual (but probably temporary) absence of royal and ministerial scandals, and with the proximity of a generally tedious Euro-election in mind, journalists not only broke open the champagne...
Forms of Power: Dimensions of an Irish Megalithic Landscape
'What must it have been like to be here in ancient times?' -- where 'here' is inside one of the Great Zimbabwe enclosures or a Mesoamerican ball-court. An architectural approach to built spaces may make coherent that felt experience, here applied to...
Orientation and Etruscan Ritual
The cosmology of the Etruscans, like so much else Etruscan, hovers on the edge of historical visibility. By exploring Etruscan temple alignments measured in situ and with the helpful context of the Disciplina Etrusca, factors are found that might affect...
The Earliest Occupation of Europe: A Short Chronology
A reappraisal of the artefactual and chronological evidence for the earliest occupation of Europe -- with proper attention to its limitation and its reliability -- makes for a short chronology. The first solid traces of hominid activities in this part...
Tin Sources for Prehistoric Bronze Production in Ireland
Ireland is important in the early metallurgy of northwest Europe, for it has given us a large majority of the Early Bronze Age artefacts from the whole British Isles. Is there tin-ore to have been mined in early Ireland to produce this bronze or must...
Towards an Archaeology of Navvy Huts and Settlements of the Industrial Revolution
Around any great construction enterprise, whether Victorian railway viaduct or contemporary motorway, there will be a passing scatter of huts and buildings, swept away when the project is complete and the builders have moved on. In the unmechanized age,...