Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 80, No. 307, March

Academic Copying, Archaeology and the English Language
There is now a proliferation of new journals on almost every conceivable topic (e.g. Journal of Happiness Studies, Queueing Systems, Wear, World Pumps, with titles for archaeologists such as Anthropoetics, Archaeological Dialogues and Archaeoastronomy...
Boat-Building and Its Social Context in Early Egypt: Interpretations from the First Dynasty Boat-Grave Cemetery at Abydos
Introduction Studying the origins and techniques of boat-building provides new data for examining social organisation, regional trade and technological conservatism in a nascent state society. A total of 22 boats have been found in Egyptian contexts...
Boat Remains and Maritime Trade in the Persian Gulf during the Sixth and Fifth Millennia BC
Introduction Evidence for early interaction between southern Mesopotamia and the Gulf emerged in the 1960s and 70s, with the identification of sixth/fifth millennium BC pottery from Mesopotamia at scores of sites in the eastern province of Saudi...
Colonials, Merchants and Alabaster Vases: The Western Phoenician Aristocracy
Introduction The image of the Phoenicians offered in the Odyssey (13,272; 14, 287 ff.; 15,415 ft.) is of robbers and slave-traders motivated only by profit, and it is an image that has been embraced over two centuries of western scholarship. The...
Editorial
The Danish government, often a leader in archaeological matters, has provided a sum of money for training its PhD students for the world of work. 'Work' in this case largely means working in universities and museums, for which one key qualification...
Freud and Volkan: Psychoanalysis, Group Identities and Archaeology
Introduction Recent discourse in archaeological theory has highlighted that the discipline's approach to existence and materiality is firmly entrenched in traditions of modern thought (Thomas 1996, 2004; Tilley 2004). It has also been shown that...
Memory and Monumentality in the Rarotongan Landscape
Introduction Recent studies on the archaeology of memory (Alcock 2002; Bradley 2002; Van Dyke & Alcock 2003; Williams 2003a, b) have developed an increasingly sophisticated awareness of how ancient societies were aware of and responded to their...
Mending the Past: IX Chel and the Invention of a Modern Pop Goddess
Introduction Archaeologists have begun to examine the ways in which knowledge about the ancient past is consumed and appropriated. The Postclassic period supernatural patron of weaving known today as Ixchel, the Maya Moon Goddess, has become a common...
New Book Chronicle
Landscapes as diverse as the uplands of Cyprus and the Sandlings of Suffolk form this chronicle's focus. Equally varied are the approaches to these landscapes, from large-scale air photographic coverage in Bohemia to nineteenth century compositions...
New Light on the Warrior Stelae from Tartessos (Spain)
Introduction We owe the name Tartessos to Graeco-Roman tradition (cf. Herodotus 4.152 ff. and 1.163, 165, Ephoros GGM 1. P. 201, Avienus Ora Maritima, etc.), and much scholarship has been dedicated to sorting out myth from history and re-defining...
Prehistoric Stone Monuments in the Northern Region of the Kula Ring
Introduction During the twentieth century, explorers, ethnographers and geologists have recorded the presence of stone monuments in Papua New Guinea and hypothesised about their age, form and function (e.g. Riesenfeld 1950). However, in practice...
Professor J.G. Evans 1941-2005
John Gwynne Evans was a renowned prehistorian and a leading figure in the development of environmental archaeology, the study of past peoples in relation to their environment. Born in St. Albans in 1941, John was educated at University College School,...
Retrospect
It seems almost narcissistic to write about myself and my supposed contributions to archaeology but when I started to do so I realised that much of what I had to say was actually about other people. Unfortunately, this runs the risk of producing a...
Rillenkarren at Vayia: Geomorphology and a New Class of Early Bronze Age Fortified Settlement in Southern Greece
Introduction The investigation of two newly discovered fortified sites, Vayia and Vassa in southern Greece, contributes to a number of important issues in archaeology in general and Aegean prehistory in particular. Surveys in regions dominated by...
The Application of First World War Aerial Photography to Archaeology: The Belgian Images
Introduction The material remains of the First World War are fragile, and under continual threat from modern land use. This study describes how a specific, non-destructive methodology can offer new materials for archaeological and historical research...
The First Settlers of Iceland: An Isotopic Approach to Colonisation
Introduction An extraordinary series of events began in the North Sea and North Atlantic region around the eighth century AD. Norse raiders and settlers from Scandinavia, better known as the Vikings, began expanding to the west, settling in the...
The Geoglyphs of the North Chilean Desert: An Archaeological and Artistic Perspective
Introduction This paper presents a summary of work carried out by the author and his colleagues over the past 30 years. A register of sites with geoglyphs, together with their associated cultural and environmental contexts, constitutes the most...
Variation in Porotic Hyperostosis in the Royal Cemetery Complex at Abydos, Upper Egypt: A Social Interpretation
Introduction This paper presents the results of a palaeopathological study of skeletal remains from the high status cemetery of Abydos in Upper Egypt associated with the rulers of the First Dynasty (Petrie 1900). The crania from two groups of spatially-distinct...