Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 80, No. 310, December

An Essay on Energetics: The Construction of the Aztec Chinampa System
Introduction All civilisations are dependent upon their ability to grow or access large amounts of food through exchange, trade, taxation and/or tribute. The archaeological and historical records demonstrate that hydraulic management in some form...
An Island Decides: Megalithic Burial Rites on Menorca
Introduction Mallorca and Menorca, the major Balearic islands, occupy, from a geographic perspective, a central position in the western Mediterranean. Nevertheless, this centrality also implies a certain remoteness from any continental coasts: eastern...
Archaeology, E-Publication and the Semantic Web
Introduction In an article in the May 2001 edition of Scientific American Tim Berners-Lee, 'inventor' of the World Wide Web, outlined his vision of how the Web would evolve (Berners-Lee et al. 2001). The problem with the present-day Web, according...
Brief Reply to Leo S. Klejn
It was with great pleasure that I learnt that Leo S. Klejn was to review Figuring It Out, since he achieved a well-deserved reputation already in the 1970s as a keen and highly independent critic of theoretical archaeology in the West. So I am naturally...
Developments in Radiocarbon Calibration for Archaeology
Introduction Radiocarbon dating underpins most of the chronologies used in archaeology for the last 50 000 years. However, it is universally acknowledged that the radiocarbon 'ages' themselves (usually expressed in terms of 14C years BP--because...
Editorial
Where is archaeology going? Can Antiquity answer this question? Should it try to? We are privileged to be sent much of the best new research--or that part of it ready to be summarised into short statements. What does it tell us about the direction...
Engineering the Past: Pitt Rivers, Nemo and the Needle
Recently, having had the pleasure of re-reading Verne's 20 000 Leagues Beneath the Sea for our children, I was struck by the similarities between the novel's elusive protagonist, Captain Nemo, and the renowned later nineteenth century British archaeologist,...
Evidence for Cave Marking by Palaeolithic Children
Introduction A wall in Gargas Cave, France, shows a baby's hand held by that of an adult while colour is blown over them. Footprints of youngsters have been immortalised into the floors of Pech Merle, Chauvet, Tuc d'Audoubert and Niaux caves. All...
Figures, Figurines and Colin Renfrew
The new book by Colin Renfrew (2003) is a remarkable phenomenon both in art criticism and archaeology. He poses the eternal questions (what are we? where do we come from?) and hopes to figure them out with the help of the parallel vision of archaeologists...
From Digger to Director, Cornwall to Caithness
Shortly before his death my father confessed to me that we had narrowly missed being killed by a V2. A few months after my birth in 1944, he had been obliged (in order to avoid 'germs on the buses') to wheel my pram from home in Hendon, North London,...
Inhumation and Cremation in Medieval Mongolia: Analysis and Analogy
Introduction The sites presented in this paper are located in northern Mongolia, and specifically in the Egyin Gol valley near the Egyin Gol river, (Figure 1), some 20km upstream from its confluence with the Selenge, which flows into Lake Baikal....
New Book Chronicle
As recent chronicles have concentrated on sites, landscapes, specific regions or issues, artefacts have so far received little attention here. It is time to redress the balance, with the fortuitous arrival on Antiquity's shelves of a series of books...
Prehistoric and Early Historic Agriculture at Maunga Orito, Easter Island (Rapa Nui), Chile
Introduction The prehistoric economy of Rapa Nui relied primarily on the production of the tuber crops of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), dryland taro (Colocasia esculenta), yam (Dioscorea spp.), and ti (Cordyline). All of these crops, with the...
Shell Beads and Social Behaviour in Pleistocene Australia
Introduction Personal ornament has long been recognised as a hallmark of modern human behaviour (d'Errico et al. 2005; Mellars 2005), and beads and pendants are among the oldest unambiguous evidence of its use. In the Old World, evidence for the...
The Emergence of the Scythians: Bronze Age to Iron Age in South Siberia
The emergence of the Karasuk culture Keywords: Bronze Age, Siberia, Minusinsk Basin, Andronovo culture, Karasuk culture, burial mounds, horses, pastoralism Introduction The Minusinsk Basin includes the middle valley of the Yenisei River and...
The Emergence of the Tagar Culture
Introduction The early nomads of Eurasia, whom ancient writers called Scythians and Sakas, occupied the great Eurasian Steppe from the beginning of the first millennium BCE. The Scythian culture is well known from the excavations of numerous rich,...
The King and His Cult: The Axe-Hammer from Sutton Hoo and Its Implications for the Concept of Sacral Leadership in Early Medieval Europe
Mound 1 at Sutton Hoo, erected on the banks of the River Deben to commemorate an East Anglian leader during the first half of the seventh century AD, covered one of the most lavishly furnished graves known from Europe. The burial is set apart not only...
The Teouma Lapita Site and the Early Human Settlement of the Pacific Islands
Introduction The recent discovery of the Lapita site at Teouma, on the south coast of Elate, central Vanuatu (Figures 1 & 2), a site which can now be identified as one of the more significant Lapita sites yet found, ultimately came about through...
Tracking Animals Using Strontium Isotopes in Teeth: The Role of Fallow Deer (Dama Dama) in Roman Britain
Introduction Non-native animals are abundant in Britain, Scotland alone having over 150 species of 'alien fauna'--in other words, creatures introduced since the last Ice Age (Welch et al. 2001). Research into the establishment of these animals has...