Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 83, No. 319, March

Aerial Archaeology in Jordan
History The earliest air photographs of archaeological sites in Jordan were taken by German aviators in 1917-18 and then, shortly after, by British and Australian pilots (cf. Kennedy 2002a). Although such photographs can be invaluable, occasionally...
A New Approach to the Archaeology of Livestock Herding in the Kalahari, Southern Africa
Introduction Archaeologists in southern Africa disagree on how to identify livestock herders in the archaeological record: some stress that pastoralists produce sites with distinctive archaeological signatures, others that the identification of...
A New Chronological Framework for Prehistoric Southeast Asia, Based on a Bayesian Model from Ban Non Wat
Introduction As Movius observed of the European Upper Palaeolithic, 'Without ... a [chronological] framework the over-all picture becomes confused and, in certain instances, almost meaningless. Time alone is the lens that can throw it into focus'...
A Re-Assessment of the Larger Fetus Found in Tutankhamen's Tomb
Introduction Within the inner treasury of the tomb of Tutankhamen were two small coffins in the style used for high personages (Carter 1933). One of these contained the small mummy of a neonate preserved in accordance with eighteenth-dynasty burial...
A Year at Stonehenge
You didn't need to be an archaeologist in 2008 to know that things were happening at Stonehenge. For years controversial plans to improve the Stonehenge environs (costed at 600m [pounds sterling]) had dominated media and much academic debate, but in...
Editorial
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] * The archaeology profession, not yet half a century old, has had plenty of ups and downs. Is it now facing an abyss? Maybe it is time to reconsider how we ply our trade--whether what we do should...
Eung Tae's Tomb: A Joseon Ancestor and the Letters of Those That Loved Him
Introduction After Buddhism was introduced into Korea in the fourth century, it remained the state religion for around 1000 years, during which time Buddhist thought was deeply rooted in the lives of the Korean people. By the latter half of the...
Exploiting a Damaged and Diminishing Resource: Survey, Sampling and Society at a Bronze Age Cemetery Complex in Cyprus
Introduction Readers of Antiquity will be aware of the increasing destruction of archaeological sites through development and illegal excavation. Nowhere is this of greater concern than on the small Mediterranean island of Cyprus. There is a consequent...
How to Make Sense of Treasure
Treasures in themselves are fetishes. Only the admirer can make 'treasure' of a find in isolation; but to wonder about it as treasure opens apt questions about why the thing was valued, by whom and under what conditions. It was worrying, then, when...
Is There a Crisis Facing British Burial Archaeology?
Introduction 2007 was an eventful year for the ethics of burial in Britain: the Science Museum returned the remains of Tasmanian Aborigines to their cultural home (Henderson 2007), the legal system governing the excavation of human remains was reinterpreted...
New Book Chronicle
This chronicle begins around the Bay of Naples, in the company of books exploring Pompeii and its surroundings. We then return to Britain for a round-up of books on British pre- and protohistory, a number of them published by Tempus, now the History...
Nineteenth-Century Apache Wickiups: Historically Documented Models for Archaeological Signatures of the Dwellings of Mobile People
Introduction An important but challenging task of archaeology is the identification of ephemeral structures, especially those temporary shelters erected by highly mobile people. Since the first Late Palaeolithic structures were defined in the Chatelperronian...
Recent Archaeometric Research on 'The Origins of Chinese Civilisation'
Introduction The origin of Chinese civilisation is an old and fraught question both in China and the West. What, for instance, does 'Chinese' mean in the context of Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age China? Should we speak of Chinese civilisation...
River Valleys and Foothills: Changing Archaeological Perceptions of North China's Earliest Farms
Introduction In recent decades discussions of the beginnings of agriculture have increasingly drawn attention to developments in China (MacNeish 1991; Smith 1998; Bellwood 2004; Barker 2007). Global synopses, as well as those concerned specifically...
Symmetry and Humans: Reply to Mithen's 'Sexy Handaxe Theory.'
In reply to Machin's criticism of Kohn and Mithen's (1999) 'Sexy Handaxe Theory' in a recent Antiquity debate (Machin 2008: 761-6), Mithen (2008: 766-9) states that sexual selection is still relevant to the symmetry of Acheulean handaxes because this...
The Date of the Greater Stonehenge Cursus
Introduction The Greater Stonehenge Cursus was first identified in 1723 by William Stukeley, who famously supposed it to have been a Roman chariot-racing track (Stukeley 1740: 41). As well as the first cursus monument to have been recognised, it...
The Invention of 'Tarentine' Red-Figure
Introduction The production centre of Apulian red-figure pottery is a subject on which the archaeological record is largely mute. The first century of this pottery's production has left no trace in the dozens of kilns and kiln dumps that have been...
The Lower Pleistocene Lithic Assemblage from Dursunlu (Konya), Central Anatolia, Turkey
Introduction Some of the most enduring questions in palaeoanthropology concern evidence for the repeated expansions of genes, populations and/or cultural practices from sub-Saharan Africa into Eurasia. The initial dispersals of Pliocene hominins...
Who Was Buried at Stonehenge?
The human remains at Stonehenge Stonehenge is Britain's largest cemetery of the third millennium cal BC and yet we know very little about who was buried there and when. Excavations across almost half of its area have yielded 52 cremation burials,...