Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 83, No. 320, June

1859 + 150: Time Depth and Process
In a single year two of the fundamental principles for the study of antiquity were established: chronology and process. Both have been elaborated and re-visited since: chronology most significantly 90 years later in 1949 with the development of radiocarbon...
Books Received
The list includes all books received between 1 December 2008 and I March 2009. Those featuring at the beginning of New Book Chronicle have, however, not been duplicated in this list. The listing of a book in this chronicle does not preclude its subsequent...
Bredaror on Kivik: A Monumental Cairn and the History of Its Interpretation
Introduction The Bronze Age cairn Bredaror on Kivik, which is situated in Scania in south-east Sweden (Figure 1), is one of the largest burial monuments in northern Europe. The cairn, looted in 1748 and excavated by Gustaf Hallstrom in 1931, famously...
Celebrating the Annus Mirabilis
We are grateful to Chris Evans for convening and introducing this imaginative archaeological tribute to the work of Charles Darwin, 150 years after the publication of his On the origin of species--the inspiration for an evolutionary concept of history...
Dante's Heritage: Questioning the Multi-Layered Model of the Mesoamerican Universe
Introduction A recurring methodological discussion in Mesoamerican research has centred on the extant use of ethnohistorical and ethnographic analogies (Trigger 1981; Quilter 1996). Although we find this approach both inevitable and productive,...
Editorial
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] * The G20 meeting in London raised expectations of large-scale government investment designed to get the global economy moving--and let's hope it does. Meanwhile the priority is to save existing jobs,...
Extraordinary Early Magdalenian Finds from El Miron Cave, Cantabria (Spain)
Introduction Cantabrian Spain has long been known for its Upper Palaeolithic cave art, portable art objects and 'utilitarian' but decorated artefacts made of bone or antler. Classic works published before the Spanish Civil War (e.g. Alcalde del...
Fifth-Century Rulers of the Kawachi Plain, Osaka, and Early State Formation in Japan: Some Recent Publications
In this brief review I introduce recent publications on the archaeology of the Kawachi Plain, Osaka, Japan, in the Middle Kofun period dating to the late fourth to early sixth centuries AD (the Kofun or Mounded Tomb period is generally thought to have...
Flint and Metal Daggers in Scandinavia and Other Parts of Europe. A Re-Interpretation of Their Function in the Late Neolithic and Early Copper and Bronze Age
Introduction In much of Late Neolithic and Early Copper/Bronze Age Europe, the dagger--made of metal or flint--was the main prestige item deposited in male graves. In the preceding period weapons such as the battle axe had been the rule, and in...
Illustrating 'Savagery': Sir John Lubbock and Ernest Griset
'Utopia, which we have long looked upon as synonymous with an evident impossibility, which we have ungratefully regarded as 'too good to be true', turns out on the contrary to be the necessary consequence of natural laws, and once more we find that...
John Evans, Joseph Prestwich and the Stone That Shattered the Time Barrier
Expert witnesses It all began in a railway carriage. Two businessmen, travelling to the Kingston Assizes in Surrey, nodded to each other as strangers do, but did not strike up a conversation. They were expert witnesses appearing for different sides...
Large-Scale Storage of Grain Surplus in the Sixth Millennium BC: The Silos of Tel Tsaf
Introduction Silos for the storage of grain have been an essential aspect of all agricultural communities throughout the ages. Harvested crops need to be kept for at least a year until the next harvest. When the amount of stored grain is larger...
Moonshine over Star Carr: Post-Processualism, Mesolithic Myths and Archaeological Realities
Introduction The early Mesolithic lake-side site of Star Carr in North Yorkshire, England, has remained a perennial topic of debate and re-interpretation ever since the original, inspired excavations of Grahame Clark in the early 1950s. The repeated...
Multiple Uses for Australian Backed Artefacts
Introduction In Australia, backed artefacts, called microliths or backed bladelets in many parts of the world, have been employed by archaeologists to demonstrate culture change. We know they appeared in the archaeological record of north-eastern...
New Book Chronicle
Invitation to the voyage One of the fleeting pleasures of being Reviews Editor at Antiquity is opening parcels. Publishers daily send exciting dispatches from the four corners of the world, and too few books, albeit a respectable proportion, make...
Pavlov VI: An Upper Palaeolithic Living Unit
Introduction One of the characteristics of the Danubian Gravettian (Pavlovian) period is that its sites are found in clusters (Gamble 1999; Roebroeks et al. 2000; Svoboda & Sedlackova 2004). These may be intensive occupations, resulting from...
Pottery Production and Islam in South-East Spain: A Social Model
Social change in the early Islamic world The rise of Islam (AD 622-632) was almost immediately followed by a considerable expansion by way of conquest. In little more than a century (AD 632 to c. 750), the Dar al-Islam would stretch from the Iberian...
Public Relations for Industrial Archaeology
Completion of the motorway M74's west end, through part of Glasgow and its fringe, was taken vigorously as an opportunity both to explain archaeology and local history to residents and to invite them to contribute to the study of the route. The route...
Small Agencies and Great Consequences: Darwin's Archaeology
'All great science is a fruitful marriage of detail and generality, exultation and explanation. Both Darwin and his beloved worms left no stone unturned.... Darwin has been gone for a century, yet he is with us whenever we choose to think about time'...
[sup.230]Th Dates for Dedicatory Corals from a Remote Alpine Desert Adze Quarry on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i
The authors show how sites in upland Hawai'i may be dated using uranium series radiogenic measurements on coral. The sites lie in a quarry, inland and at high altitude, with little carboniferous material around, and radiocarbon dating is anyway...
'The Farm beneath the Sand'-An Archaeological Case Study on Ancient 'Dirt' DNA
Introduction It is generally known among archaeologists that ancient DNA can be obtained from macrofossil remains such as bones and teeth. It is perhaps less recognised that ancient DNA can also be retrieved directly from ancient sediments, ice...
The Oldest and Longest Enduring Microlithic Sequence in India: 35 000 Years of Modern Human Occupation and Change at the Jwalapuram Locality 9 Rockshelter
Introduction Microlithic technologies play a central role in debates over modern human origins and dispersals, responses to risk and climate change, and the emergence of modern human capacities for complex behaviour and symbolic thought (Clark 1968;...
The Roots of Provenance: Glass, Plants and Isotopes in the Islamic Middle East
Introduction By the mid-eighth and ninth centuries, the time of the 'Abbasid caliphate in the Islamic world, society was complex, dynamic and highly centralised. Urban life was dominated by the caliph, and at a local level, by regional governors....
The Xiongnu Settlements of Egiin Gol, Mongolia
'[W]andering from place to place pasturing their animals. The animals they raise consist mainly of horses, cows and sheep ... They move about in search of water and pasture and have no walled cities or fixed dwellings, nor do they engage in any kind...