Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 80, No. 309, September

Andrew Sherratt Remembered
Andrew Sherratt was a scholar of world class and with worm interests, who will be missed as much for what he had yet to do, as for what he had already achieved. Andrew was a lively and influential director of Antiquity, someone to whom we turned for...
Beaker Age Bracers in England: Sources, Function and Use
Introduction Bracers are thin pieces of fine-grained stone, usually rectangular, and perforated at their narrow ends. The number of perforations present is usually two (one at each end) or four, although in some cases the number reaches 12 or 18....
Between the Mediterranean and the Sahara: Geoarchaeological Reconnaissance in the Jebel Gharbi, Libya
Introduction Recent archaeological research in North Africa has brought into focus the final phase of the Pleistocene which increasingly appears to have been a period of critical environmental and human changes. Starting from the Middle Palaeolithic...
Bones Chewed by Canids as Evidence for Human Excarnation: A British Case Study
Introduction The possibility of corpse exposure as a component of earlier Neolithic mortuary practice has long been suspected, although specific evidence for such a practice has been slow to emerge until quite recently. Scott's (1992) survey of...
'Due Diligence' and Context: The Janssen Americas Collection
Spectacular works from the ancient Americas were exhibited at the Museum of Art & History in Geneva from October 2005 to April 2006. 83 of them were attributed to the Central Andes, about 100 to Colombia, 42 to Central America, 104 to Mesoamerica,...
Editorial
Photography is archaeology's partner, not its servant. We grew up together, played together on the sunny slopes of Greece and together explored the fetid jungles of Guatemala. One hundred and fifty years on, has some of the poetry departed from our...
Environment and Culture Change in Neolithic Southeast China
Introduction The Neolithic cultures of the coast of Southeast China and Taiwan appeared in c. 6500 BP and subsequently underwent significant changes (Jiao 2004; Lin 1993). Various mechanisms have been proposed for these events, often in association...
King's Monuments: Identifying 'Formlings' in Southern African San Rock Paintings
Introduction A formling is a particular category of San rock art image that occurs in Zimbabwe in its thousands (Garlake 1990: 17), although a few occur in northern South Africa (Mguni 2002) and some in western Namibia (Mason 1958) (Figures 1 and...
Newgrange-A View from the Platform
Introduction It was in Antiquity that the late M.J. O'Kelly (1979) first presented a detailed discussion of the restoration of Newgrange. Debate on this issue has focused on the decision by the Office of Public Works to build a reinforced concrete...
Oceanic Rock Art: First Direct Dating of Prehistoric Stencils and Paintings from New Caledonia (Southern Melanesia)
Introduction Defining the history of pre-European settlement in the Pacific has been a subject of scholarly concern since Captain James Cook sailed these oceans in the eighteenth century. Archaeological research of the last 50 years provides a fairly...
Quantifying the Threat to Archaeological Sites from the Erosion of Cultivated Soil
Introduction It has long been recognised that modern cultivation techniques, particularly ploughing, have an erosive impact on archaeological sites (e.g. Lambrick 1977). Nevertheless, it is only in recent years that any attempt has been made to...
The Aurochs, Nature Worship and Exploitation in Eastern Gaul
Aurochs horn cores at a thermal spring The spa at Bourbonne-les-Bains (Haute-Marne, France) has been used since its foundation around 11/7 BC to the present day, and is one of the most intensively visited in northern Gaul and France. Its 66[degrees]C...
The 'Briquetage De la Seille' (Lorraine, France): Proto-Industrial Salt Production in the European Iron Age
Introduction Salt is a mineral resource essential for the existence of human societies, and crucially, one that must be procured in part through artificial means. It may be obtained directly by mining deposits accessible from the surface, a technique...
The Domestication of Water: The Neolithic Well at Sha'ar Hagolan, Jordan Valley, Israel
Introduction A reliable source of drinking water is the most basic requirement for human physical survival. Hence, through the entire history of humankind all temporary encampments or sedentary settlements have been located near or within a short...
The Emergence of Bronze Age Chariots in Eastern Europe
Introduction The first appearance of war chariots with harnessed horses is one of the most intriguing problems in Old World prehistory. The horse-drawn chariots occur in burials featuring horses, items of harnesses and pieces of armament, in cemeteries...
The First Specialised Copper Industry in the Iberian Peninsula: Cabezo Jure (2900-2200 BC)
Introduction The origin of copper-working has been a key issue in European prehistory since V.G. Childe associated it with the development of European civilisation. In spite of Renfrew's (1969, 1970) important early suggestion that metallurgy might...
The Olmec and the Origins of Mesoamerican Civilisation
In a recent editorial, Martin Carver mentioned a series of papers that purportedly debate whether the Olmec of Gulf Coastal Mexico were Mesoamerica's 'mother culture' or one of several Early Formative 'sister cultures.' The papers in question concern...
The Pacific's Earliest Painted Pottery: An Added Layer of Intrigue to the Lapita Debate and Beyond
Introduction Human colonisation of the Pacific began in the far west of Near Oceania, at least 40 000 years ago (Allen & Gosden 1991; Leavesley & Chappell 2004; Wickler & Spriggs 1988) and progressed as far as the end of the Solomons...
The Rolling Stones of Newgrange
In his paper 'Newgrange--a view from the platform' Gabriel Cooney accepts that the quartz/ granite layer at Newgrange was never part of a wall; instead it constituted a structure--a platform--placed on the ground. This new view was first put forward...
Vegetation and Land-Use at Angkor, Cambodia: A Dated Pollen Sequence from the Bakong Temple Moat
Introduction Angkor was the location of the capital of the Khmer state for most of the period from the eighth to sometime in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries AD. By the twelfth century Angkor had become a vast low-density urban complex covering...