Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 84, No. 324, June

Administrators' Bread: An Experiment-Based Re-Assessment of the Functional and Cultural Role of the Uruk Bevel-Rim Bowl
The significance of BRBs in the Uruk period Bevel-rim bowls (BRBs) are distinctive coarse, thick-walled, conical ceramic bowls that first appear in southern Mesopotamia in the early fourth millennium (Table 1), and by the mid-fourth millennium cluster...
A First 'Wessex 1' Date from Wessex
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The 'Wessex Culture' A radiocarbon date has been obtained for the first time for a grave belonging to the Wessex 1 grave series and coming from Wessex itself, courtesy of the Beaker People Project (hereafter, BPP). The...
Ancient Bird Stencils Discovered in Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction In July 2009 five stencils of the complete body of a bird were found on the wall and ceiling of a small rockshelter that is part of an extraordinary rock art complex known to the local Maung speaking Aboriginal...
An Early Epipalaeolithic Sitting Burial from the Azraq Oasis, Jordan
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The rarity of human remains from late Upper Palaeolithic and Early Epipalaeolithic contexts in south-west Asia has, to date, prevented a fuller examination and discussion of human burial practices during the...
Ashmolean Museum Transformed
Oxford's Ashmolean Museum has been transformed. Most of the galleries, so long familiar to archaeologists, have been replaced in an exciting architectural idiom and a thought-provoking new method of display. The Ashmolean holds Oxford University's...
Buildings as Persons: Relationality and the Life of Buildings in a Northern Periphery of Early Modern Sweden
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Matthew Johnson opened a paper two decades ago with the question, 'Why is the study of vernacular architecture in England so boring?' (1990: 245). He emphasised that while the subject matter itself is fascinating,...
Cities and Social Order in Sasanian Iran-The Archaeological Potential
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Research focusing on the history and nature of Iranian cities during the Sasanian period, AD 224-651, is still in its infancy (Huff 1986: 177). Indeed, much of our knowledge base is drawn from a combination...
Colonisation, Mobility and Exchange in New Zealand Prehistory
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction New Zealand was settled during the last phase of the Austronesian expansion that commenced around 3300 BP, when Lapita peoples moved down the coasts of New Guinea and into the Oceanic world beyond. In Papua...
Editorial
The so-called Staffordshire (or Hammerwich) hoard continues to baffle all that see it, even after lengthy seminars, and it is my earnest hope that Antiquity will soon be in a position to present our readers with a sober account of what we know so far....
Fire on the Desert: Conflict Archaeology and the Great Arab Revolt in Jordan, 1916-18
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The archaeology of the First World War is not confined to the deep verticality of the Western Front's industrialised battlefields in France and Belgium. In the Middle East, in that part of the Ottoman Empire...
Historic Routes to Angkor: Development of the Khmer Road System (Ninth to Thirteenth Centuries AD) in Mainland Southeast Asia
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Ancient road systems: context and methods of study Investigating the chronology of road systems is complicated by their frequent reuse over long time periods and because they are comprised of multiple archaeological components...
Huaqueros and Remote Sensing Imagery: Assessing Looting Damage in the Viru Valley, Peru
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Archaeologists, conservationists, and a variety of other stakeholders, now recognise the market-driven looting of archaeological sites as a global problem, but solutions remain elusive and even describing the...
Kumako: A Place of Convergence for Maroons and Amerindians in Suriname, SA
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The Dutch occupied Suriname in the mid 1600s after failed attempts by the French and English. In a span of 20 years Suriname had changed hands from the French to the Spanish and Portuguese, who were quickly...
Letter from Libya: Epigraphy and Landscape
Although epigraphers can deal with inscriptions on shell, pottery, glass, wood, silk and tattooed bodies (but on no account with what are the jealous provinces of the papyrologist and the numismatist), their texts are more often than not on bulky stone...
Living on the Lake in the Iron Age: New Results from Aerial Photographs, Geophysical Survey and Dendrochronology on Sites of Biskupin Type
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The Early Iron Age stockade site of Biskupin in central Poland is one of the most famous prehistoric sites in Europe, well known to archaeologists since its discovery in 1933 and the early seasons of excavation...
New Rock Art Discoveries in the Kurnool District, Andhra Pradesh, India
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction India has a vast amount of rock art of global significance (Bednarik & Chakravarty 1997), consisting mainly of paintings and petroglyphs. Initial investigations began in the late 1800s (e.g. Cockburn 1899;...
Radiocarbon Dating the Iron Age in the Levant: A Bayesian Model for Six Ceramic Phases and Six Transitions
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The authors of the present paper recently explored the possibility of constructing a framework for Iron Age chronology in the Levant by assigning radiocarbon dates to a set of destruction layers (Finkelstein...
Social Change at the Harappan Settlement of Gola Dhoro: A Reading from Animal Bones
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The Indus civilisation (c. 2600-1900 BC) integrated several distinct regions into one of the world's first state-level societies. As Harappa, Mohenjodaro, and several other population centres in the alluvial...
Still Water, Hidden Depths: The Deposition of Bronze Age Metalwork in the English Fenland
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction: landscapes and waterscapes Landscapes have been studied by archaeologists for many years, but what are 'waterscapes'? In a recent publication, the anthropologist Veronica Strang has used the term to draw attention...
The Emergence of Bone-Working and Ornamental Art in the Caucasian Upper Palaeolithic
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The Upper Palaeolithic in the Caucasus: old views and recent discoveries The place of the Caucasian Upper Palaeolithic (UP) has been under discussion since the 1930s. Zamiamin (1935) described it as generally Aurignacian...
The Fall of Phaethon: A Greco-Roman Geomyth Preserves the Memory of a Meteorite Impact in Bavaria (South-East Germany)
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The term 'geomythology', coined by Dorothy Vitaliano (1968: 5), 'indicates every case in which the origin of myths and legends can be shown to contain references to geological phenomena and aspects, in a broad...