Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 81, No. 314, December

300 Years of Context for British Archaeology
The Society of Antiquaries is marking its tercentenary with the claim that, all along, it has enshrined the very spirit of British enquiry into the material evidence of history. Its first and biggest celebration was the exhibition, Making History,...
A 14 000 Year-Old Hunter-Gatherer's Toolkit
Introduction A cache of 36 objects provides a rare insight into the organisation of hunting and gathering technology by a late Pleistocene hunter-gatherer community which lived in the Jordan Valley around 12 000 BP/12 000 cal BC. The items were...
A Mass Grave from the Catacomb of Saints Peter and Marcellinus in Rome, Second-Third Century AD
Introduction The catacomb of San Pietro e Marcellino (Saints Peter and Marcellinus hereafter) extends to almost 3ha with 4.5km of subterranean galleries at three levels, containing between 20 000 and 25 000 burials (Guyon 1987; 2004). Located to...
Ammonite Fossil Portrayed on an Ancient Greek Countermarked Coin
Introduction Ammonites are fossils of an extinct group of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic marine cephalopods distinguished by their planispiral shells. Ancient human communities are known to have collected and engraved ammonite fossils 25 000 years ago...
Augusta McMahon with McGuire Gibson, Robert D. Biggs, David Reese, Pamela Vandiver & K. Aslihan Yener. Nippur V. the Early Dynastic to Akkadian Transition: The Area WF Sounding at Nippur
AUGUSTA MCMAHON with McGUIRE GIBSON, ROBERT D. BIGGS, DAVID REESE, PAMELA VANDIVER & K. ASLIHAN YENER. Nippur V. The Early Dynastic to Akkadian Transition: the Area WF Sounding at Nippur (Excavations at Nippur volume V [McGuire Gibson, series editor],...
Books Received
The list includes all books received between 1 June 2007 and 1 September 2007. Those featuring at the beginning of New Book Chronicle have, however, not been duplicated in this list. The listing of a book in this chronicle does not preclude its subsequent...
Bridging the Gap at la Tene
Some thirty years ago, I took part in the Seminar fur Ur- und Fruhgeschichte der Universitat Basel's traditional field trip to La Tene. We discussed the various interpretations put forward for a site that had given its name to the later Iron Age in...
Celti Come Again
This issue of Antiquity features reviews of Harding's Archaeology of Celtic Art (p. 1111-3) and of an exhibition about La Tene (p. 1067-70), so let us take the opportunity to embark on a long-overdue tour of Iron Age Europe. The luck of the draw, or...
Cultivated Wetlands and Emerging Complexity in South-Central Chile and Long Distance Effects of Climate Change
Introduction Archaeologists, geographers and historians have seen the grasslands and temperate forests of the southern cone of South America as backwater environments where only hunters and gatherers lived until AD 1550 to 1650 when the Spanish...
Dating the Onset of Cereal Cultivation in Britain and Ireland: The Evidence from Charred Cereal Grains
Introduction This paper reviews the evidence for the dating of the onset of cereal cultivation in Britain and Ireland, based upon radiocarbon-dated remains of charred cereals and also of dated contexts containing charred cereals. Many more sites...
Detecting Seasonal Movement from Animal Dung: An Investigation in Neolithic Northern Greece
Introduction Recent archaeological investigations of prehistoric habitation in northern Greece have demonstrated the co-existence of two settlement types, namely the tell, considered until recently as the type-site of the Greek Neolithic (e.g. Sherratt...
Economic and Ideological Roles of Copper Ingots in Prehistoric Zimbabwe
Introduction The collections in the Zimbabwe Museum of Human Sciences in Harare include a number of copper ingots (Figure 1) found by chance on the ground surface or as a result of shallow diggings, particularly during ploughing. None of them has...
Editorial
Our review of the year (overleaf) shows a healthy spread of research from the Lower Palaeolithic to the twentieth century, and placing them in our arbitrary time periods shows--once again--the surprising number of surprising things going on the world...
Fashion versus Reason-Then and Now
Analogies between modern practice and prehistoric material culture are becoming increasingly useful for archaeologists, including those interested in branding studies, for example (e.g. Wengrow, in press) and at formal research centres such as the...
From the Perspective of Time: Hunter-Gatherer Burials in South-Eastern Australia
Introduction In south-eastern Australia thousands of Aboriginal burials, mainly of Holocene date (based on absolute and geomorphological dating), have been exposed through processes of erosion and, less frequently, through land developments (e.g....
Funerals and Feasts during the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B of the near East
Introduction The site of Kfar HaHoresh, located in northern Israel (Figure 1), is the first centralised mortuary-cum-cult site to be identified in the Neolithic of the Levant (Goring-Morris 2000; 2005). It has been suggested that the site functioned...
Grinding Flour in Upper Palaeolithic Europe (25 000 Years Bp)
Introduction By virtue of the surviving evidence, the diet of Palaeolithic people has been considered primarily carnivorous, and there has been little evidence for the exploitation of plants. The research reported here has identified the remains...
Monument 3 from la Blanca, Guatemala: A Middle Preclassic Earthen Sculpture and Its Ritual Associations
Introduction Among the many artistic achievements of ancient Mesoamerica, none is more notable than the long-standing sculptural tradition. Ancient Mesoamerican sculptors worked in a variety of media, including stone, wood, stucco and clay. Works...
Moving On: The Contribution of Isotope Studies to the Early Neolithic of Central Europe
Introduction The strontium isotope ratio recorded in the teeth and bone of both human and animal skeletons can be used to infer movements made during an individual's lifetime (Price et al. 2001; Bentley et al. 2002; 2003a; 2003b; Bentley & Knipper...
New Finds of Upper Palaeolithic Decorative Objects from Predmosti, Czech Republic
Introduction A team of archaeologists led by Jiri Svoboda, of the Institute of Archaeology, Dolni Vestonice, and Martin Jones, of the University of Cambridge, has been excavating selected portions of the Gravettian sites of Moravia, beginning at...
Plant Offerings from the Classical Necropolis of Limenas, Thasos, Northern Greece
Introduction The ancient city of Thasos (also known as Limenas), situated on the north edge of the island of Thasos, was an important site of the Greek world (Figure 1). Limenas was colonised by the people of Paros at the beginning of the seventh...
Polish Archaeology in My Lifetime
As a young man I was witness to rapid political and social changes, and began to appreciate the importance of the social and historical sciences. I was particularly attracted to sociology, because of its rich and prestigious tradition going back to...
Rethinking Erlitou: Legend, History and Chinese Archaeology
Introduction: Erlitou and its dynastic affiliations The Erlitou site in the Yiluo basin of the Yellow River is the primary centre of the Erlitou culture (c. 1900-1500 BC), representing the largest urban settlement of the earliest archaic state developed...
Rome and Mesopotamia-Importers into India in the First Millennium AD
Introduction Recent fieldwork in India by this writer included a systematic programme to view and identify imported Roman amphorae. Such an undertaking was possible because of the extensive review of amphora sites compiled by Sunil Gupta (1993;...
The First Archaeological Evidence for Death by Spearing in Australia
Introduction This paper documents the first archaeological evidence in Australia both for death by spearing and for the use of backed artefacts as spear armatures. Excavation below a bus shelter in the beachside suburb of Narrabeen in northern Sydney,...
Waist-to-Hip Ratios of Jomon Figurines
Introduction Jomon Japan was one of the main centres of ceramic figurine production in the prehistoric world. Within Japanese archaeology there has been a long debate over the meaning and function of these figurines and a broad range of analytical...