Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 70, No. 270, December

1st Unnamed Cave: A Mississippian Period Cave Art in East Tennessee, USA
Mud-glyphs and 1st Unnamed Cave In 1979, an amateur speleologist discovered and explored a small cave in eastern Tennessee. Deep in the cave, in the 'dark zone' beyond the reach of all light, he saw scratches and lines incised into thick clay banks...
4000 Years of Human Impact and Vegetation Change in the Central Peruvian Andes - with Events Paralleling the Maya Record?
Recording the human presence in the central Andes Most civilizations in the world probably had their kick-start subsequent to the bizarre accident of cultivating cereals - wheat, rice, maize or millet. In the Andes, a major centre for the origin of...
A Letter from Line: The Flensburg Antiquities and the Danish-Prussian/Austrian War of 1864
The letter from Line We may begin the extraordinary story of the Flensburg Collection, largest provincial museum in the United Monarchy of Denmark, with the letter from Line:(1) Flensburg, February the 20th [1864] 'Dear Madam, 'We are all very worried...
An Aerial Archeology Training Week, 15-22 June 1996, Held near Siofok, Lake Balaton, Hungary
From the onset of the Second World War until 1990, archaeologists in most of the countries behind the former Iran Curtain were unable to take aerial photographs for record or research. During these 50 years, the contribution of aerial reconnaissance...
A Revised Chronology for Pastoralism in Southernmost Africa: New Evidence of Sheep at C. 2000 B.P. from Blombos Cave, South Africa
New excavation at Blombos Cave, in the southern Cape of South Africa, and new radiocarbon dates for its sequence further illuminate the chronology of pastoralism in southern Africa, and the relations between pottery-using and shepherding. Sheep in southern...
'Canarium' in the Southeast Asian and Oceanic Archaeobotanical and Pollen Records
Canarium Canarium (Burseraceae) is a genus of c. 100 species, centred on Malaysia, comprising mainly large primary or secondary forest trees growing at low altitudes. There are monographs by Leenhouts (1959a; 1959b) for Malesia (the ever-wet tropics...
Development of an Agroforest on a Micronesian High Island: Prehistoric Kosraean Agriculture
Prehistoric Micronesian agriculture Prehistoric Micronesian agriculture has been seldom considered as a subject for investigation in its own right. Notwithstanding several discussions based on very limited data (e.g. Ayres & Haun 1990; Parker &...
Dryland Agricultural Expansion and Intensification in Kohala, Hawai'i Island
Throughout the Hawaiian archipelago, dryland agricultural field systems constituted a significant component of the late prehistoric subsistence economy. Of the various dryland systems, the leeward or west side of the island of Hawai'i is notable for...
Early Human Occupation of Northern Australia: Archaeology and Thermoluminescence Dating of Jinmium Rock-Shelter, Northern Territory
Recent debate on the Aboriginal colonization of the Australian continent has hinged on interpretations of both palaeoecological and archaeological evidence. Palaeoecological evidence has been interpreted to suggest human colonization before or coincident...
Funeral Practices and Animal Sacrifices in Mongolia at the Uigur Period: Archaeological and Ethno-Historical Study of a 'Kurgan' in the Egyin Gol Valley (Baikal Region)
Funeral practices in central Eurasia Our knowledge of funeral practices among the ancient peoples of central Eurasia comes mainly from written documents (Roux 1963), and also from archaeological findings (Gravilova 1965: Konovalo 1976), including the...
In Defence of Lead Isotope Analysis
The recent ANTIQUITY paper by Budd et al. (1996), 'Rethinking the quest for provenance', is the latest in a series of polemical papers on archaeometallurgy by the Ancient Metallurgy Research Group at Bradford. Having started with the appearance of arsenical...
More Dating Evidence for Human Remains in British Caves
Human remains are frequently discovered in caves, but their primary contexts are often uncertain. Aldhouse-Green et al. (1996), summarizing direct radiocarbon dates for prehistoric human skeletal remains from nine caves in Wales, drew attention to the...
Origin and Development of Australian Aboriginal Tropical Rainforest Culture: A Reconsideration
Human use of rainforest Rainforest ecosystems appear peripheral to the interests of early hominids during global colonization, with little archaeological evidence indicating their long-term exploitation by successive modern human ancestors (Gamble 1993:...
People, Process and the Poverty-Pew: A Functional Analysis of Mundane Buildings in the Nottinghamshire Framework-Knitting Industry
Current developments in American and Australian historical archaeology emphasize the range of evidence and methodological developments relating to the recent past (Connah 1988; Deetz 1977; Dickens 1982; Glassie 1975; Gould & Schiffer 1981; McGuire...
Peru's Colonial Wine Industry and Its European Background
The Moquegua valley and its bodegas An important - if little heralded - economic enterprise of colonial-period Peru was its wine industry. Begun by Spanish colonists in the mid 16th century (see Brown 1986; Cushner 1980; Davies 1984) to alleviate chronic...
Phylogeny vs Reticulation in Prehistory
The debate We were standing in front of a painting with two white water lilies. I stepped a little closer to the picture and looked at it. It was then that I noticed that the lilies were nothing but blobs and blotches of paint. But when I stepped away...
Residues on Stone Artefacts: State of a Scientific Art
At the 1996 Society for American Archaeology meeting in fabulous New Orleans, residues and functional analysis of stone artefacts were the specific focus of offerings scattered through the programme in posters (e.g.D. Lee, T. Murphy, L. Hooper and R....
Science, Stratigraphy and the Deep Sequence: Excavation vs Regional Survey and the Question of Gendered Practice in Archeology
When, over 30 years ago, scholars started seriously to dismantle the idea that science was a pursuit unaffected by social and political values, they opened up a huge field of investigation. When, over 20 years ago, feminist scholars started to contribute...
The Boat Models from Eridu: Sailing or Spinning during the 'Ubaid Period?
Investigations at Eridu (Tell Abu Shahrein) in southern Mesopotamia during the 1940s discovered clay vessels that were interpreted as models of sailing-boats [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURES 1 AND 2 OMITTED] (Lloyd & Safar 1948: 118 & plate 5; Safar...
The Origin of the True Chariot
Early spoked wheels in the steppes The spoked wheel, together with horse draught and the bitted bridle, are usually considered the essentials of the war, hunting and (later) racing chariot, but it can be shown that these features alone are not enough.(1)...
The Plants and the People from Buiston Crannog, Ayrshire, Scotland
The 'crannog' of Buiston The word 'crannog' is a term used in Scotland and Ireland to describe a category of archaeological structures forming partially or wholly man-made islands in lakes, rivers and estuaries (e.g. Morrison 1985). They are often interpreted...
Why Didn't Westropp's 'Mesolithic' Catch on in 1872?
The European Mesolithic was defined by Grahame Clark (1932: 5) as the period 'between the close of the Pleistocene and the arrival of the Neolithic arts of life'. This marked the full acceptance of the word in its modem sense, referring to the post-glacial...
'Zemis,' Trees, and Symbolic Landscapes: Three Taino Carvings from Jamaica
Taino zemis In 1495, during his second voyage to the Caribbean, Christopher Columbus was one of a handful of Europeans to observe a religious rite of the indigenous Taino (Arawak) inhabitants of Hispaniola (Bourne 1906: 171-2; Columbus [1969]: 192)....