Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 70, No. 267, March

A Mutilated Human Skull from Roman St Albans, Hertfordshire, England
A skull excavated from a 2nd-cemetery AD pit in the Roman city of St Albans shows evidence for violent injury and displays cut-marks which seem to indicate deliberate defleshing. The find appears to be without close parallel in Roman Britain. The site...
Ancient Celts and Modern Ethnicity
In September 1994 the European Association of Archaeologists held its inaugural meeting in Ljubljana, Slovenia, a sovereign nation formerly part of Yugoslavia. As was to be expected in such a place and at such a time, questions of ethnicity and identity...
An Embarrassment of Professors?
The judgements shaping archaeology and every subject in British universities (see remarks in the Editorial above) are based on certain presumptions about how research and teaching can best be done. Some of these premisses are noted. Recently, there...
Antiquities as Symbolic Capital in Modern Greek Society
The Great Powers - starting with ancient Imperial Rome and running up to the present - have valued Classical Greek culture as embodying the founding spirit of their own, our own western world. So where does the modern state of Greece stand? It is, more...
Apes and Ancestors
Corbey & Theunissen's edited volume marks an important development in the study of human ancestry. While human-origins research has long boasted of having an interdisciplinary approach, this volume represents a different kind of interdisciplinarianism....
A Remote Analogy?: From Central Australian Tjurunga to Irish Early Bronze Age Axes
Our interpretation of Bronze Age metalwork is based, for the most part, on commonsense ideas of what is functional and what is not, which items were intended to be recovered, which were gifts to other worlds. A more considered source of analogy than...
Bioarchaeological and Climatological Evidence for the Fate of Norse Farmers in Medieval Greenland
Greenland, far north land of the Atlantic, has often been beyond the limit of European farming settlement. One of its Norse settlements, colonized just before AD 1000, is astonishingly - not even at the southern tip, but a way up the west coast, the...
Brochs and Iron Age Society: A Reappraisal
The brochs, great stone towers of Iron Age Scotland, are famously puzzling. Who inhabited this strongholds (if habitations they were)? New fieldwork at the broch of Dun Vulan, on South Uist in the Western Isles, prompt reappraisal of the geographical...
Childeish Questions
The criteria used in the British universities' current assessment of research quality prompt the question: how would Gordon Childe have fared, if assessed that way? Two recent books about Gordon Childe (Harris 1995; Gathercole et al. 1995), and Peter...
Coming to Terms with the Living: Some Aspects of Repatriation for the Archaeologist
This volume reports the outcome of a request (made in 1987 to the National Museum of Natural History, a branch of the Smithsonian Institution) by the Larsen Bay Tribal Council. That request concerned the return to the people of Larsen Bay of all human...
East Chisenbury: Ritual and Rubbish at the British Bronze Age-Iron Age Transition
The repertoire of site-types for later English prehistory has not changed for a generation. Now, from East Chisenbury on Salisbury Plain, a new type is defined, a midden of refuse so large and strange it re-defines the concept of 'rubbish' and its 'disposal'....
Fields of View in Landscape Archaeology
A growing literature in landscape archaeology reflects moves away from a long-standing preoccupation with excavation of individual sites and confronts much wider issues of multi-period past landscapes, the date and social role of fields and boundaries...
Genetics, Archaeology and the Wider World
Molecular biology is prompting a renewed interest in genetic histories of ancient peoples. What are the old 'ethnic units' of these modern studies? In her recent review (1995), Erika Hagelberg referred to Cavalli-Sforza, Menozzi & Piazza's enormous...
Irrigation, Raised Fields and State Management: Wittfogel Redux?
The Wittfogel model, like Elvis, refuses to die. And like the impersonators of Elvis Presley who earn their keep by rocking around the clock, Karl Wittfogel's 'hydraulic hypothesis' (Wittfogel 1938; 1957) continues to be repackaged in a variety of guises...
On Archaeological Value
The present system of English resource management relies on legal protected status given to a pre-designated group of monuments. When it is replaced by an adversarial debate between social values, hosted by the planning system, archaeology will need...
Palestine: Social Transitions, Diverse Concerns
This volume, the outcome of a symposium held in San Diego in 1993, is the most recent synthesis of the archaeology of the southwestern Levant. It is the first reference work to address diverse issues of a social or anthropological nature along with detailed...
Pattern in the Epipalaeolithic of the Levant: Debate after Neeley & Barton
The ANTIQUITY paper by Neeley & Barton (1994) - hereafter 'N&B' - prompted responses published in the June number last year: Fellner (1995) and Kaufman (1995). Here are more (all shorter than the full versions received), together with a response...
Portraits, the Cult of Relics and the Affirmation of Hierarchy at an Early Medieval Monastery: San Vincenzo Al Volturno
San Vincenzo al Volturno is an early medieval monastery in the high province of Molise, southeast of Rome, and site of most substantial excavations over the last 15 years. The publication of portrait wall-paintings from the crypt of its great church,...
Pots, Trade and the Archaic Greek Economy
Fine painted pottery is the archaeological trade-mark of the Greek presence overseas. Since other materials of exchange in the Classical world - soft things like grain, oil and slaves - are less archaeologically visible, a fresh look at issues in the...
Rethinking the Quest for Provenance
One of the larger - and more expensive - present programmes of study in archaeological science explores the provenance of prehistoric bronzes from the Mediterranean. What are the bases of research? What will the findings tell us about the real place...
Ritual or Fluvial? A Further Comment on the Thames Skulls
Further (and final) comment on the origin of ancient human skulls from the River Thames (ANTIQUITY 62 (1988): 503-9; 69 (1995): 162-9) is prompted by comparison with the skulls from the London Thames tributary, the Walbrook. Knusel & Carr's ANTIQUITY...
Stonehenge Saved?
As was noticed in the December 1995 ANTIQUITY, the present surroundings of Stonehenge - premier monument of European prehistory - are unhappy. Geoffrey Wainwright, head of archaeology at English Heritage, reports the current proposals to make a fit setting...
Style and Function in East Polynesian Fish-Hooks
The concepts of style and function are theoretically defined from a neo-Darwinian perspective and the expected spatial-temporal distributions of each kind of trait outlined. Fish-hook assemblages from Aitutaki, Cook Islands, are examined using this framework...
The Diffusion of Light by Translucent Media in Antiquity: A Propos Two Alabaster Window-Pane Fragments from Ed-Dur (United Arab Emirates)
From a University of Copenhagen excavation in the United Arab Emirates come two fragments of sheet alabaster, from a large private house dated to the 1st century AD. They prompt consideration of alabaster's use for windows and of provision for natural...
The Swahili and the Mediterranean Worlds: Pottery of the Late Roman Period from Zanzibar
Mortimer Wheeler famously tied together the worlds of ancient Rome and ancient India by finding Roman ceramics stratified into levels at Arikamedu, south India. Late Roman pottery from far down the East African coast new permits the same kind of matching...
Was There Really a Neolithic in Norway?
For temperate Europe, the transition to the Neolithic is still both defined by a shift from a hunter-gatherer to a farming economy and archaeologically recognized by its characteristic artefacts of pottery and polished-stone axes. But what should be...