Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 86, No. 331, March

African Earthen Structures in Colonial Louisiana: Architecture from the Coincoin Plantation (1787-1816)
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction North American plantation archaeology, since its inception in the late 1960s, has largely concentrated on the East Coast, with some outlying studies in the sugar planting areas of the Gulf Coast (Singleton...
An Early Holocene Task Camp (~8.5 Ka Cal BP) on the Coast of the Semi-Arid North of Chile
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Among current hypotheses about the peopling of America, the model of a coastal route, as an alternative to the 'classic' inland model, is gaining strength (Fladmark 1979; Dixon 2001; Surovell 2003; Erlandson...
Books Received
The list includes all books received between 1 September and 1 December 2011. Those featuring at the beginning of New Book Chronicle have, however, not been duplicated in this list. The listing of a book in this chronicle does not preclude its subsequent...
Chronology, Mound-Building and Environment at Huaca Prieta, Coastal Peru, from 13 700 to 4000 Years Ago
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The warming trend at the end of the Pleistocene led to new and generally richer terrestrial and coastal environments that were exploited by human foragers in several regions of the world (Straus et al. 1996)....
Deceiver, Joker or Innocent? Teilhard De Chardin and Piltdown Man
Arthur Smith Woodward, an expert on fossil fish and Keeper of Palaeontology at the British Museum (Natural History), made the official announcement of the discovery of 'Piltdown Man' (Eoanthropus dawsoni) on 18 December 1912 at Burlington House in...
Disease, CCR5-[DELTA]32 and the European Spread of Agriculture? A Hypothesis
From its origins in the Starcevo-Koros culture of the Hungarian Plain around 5700 BC the Neolithic archaeological assemblage of the Linearbandkeramik (LBK) spread within two centuries to reach Alsace and the middle Rhine by 5500 BC, though the rapidity...
Editorial
Ten days in Japan must count among the archaeological treats of a life-time--especially if you are the guest of the team putting together a World Heritage bid--and so get to see lots of sites. My invitation arrived because I am supposed to know something...
Hunter-Gatherers, Biogeographic Barriers and the Development of Human Settlement in Tierra del Fuego
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The archaeology of sea barriers comprises a variety of situations, many of which concern the colonisation of oceanic islands (Cherry 1981) or particularly difficult crossings like the Strait of Gibraltar (Derricourt...
Interpreting the Beaker Phenomenon in Mediterranean France: An Iron Age Analogy
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Context For more than a century the discovery in many regions of Europe of decorated Bell Beakers associated with weapons and objects of personal adornment, often found in individual burials, has fascinated researchers,...
In the Gallery: Priorities Today
How do visitors make sense of displays? What should curators be trying to achieve with them? Some 70 experts and students spent a day on these and related issues at the Fitzwilliam Museum, in Cambridge University, on 23 September last, to celebrate...
Large-Scale Cereal Processing before Domestication during the Tenth Millennium Cal BC in Northern Syria
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The adoption of cultivation in the Near East involved a shift from gathering a broad spectrum of plants during the Natufian to cultivation of a reduced range of cereals and pulses during the PPNA and PPNB (Weiss...
Later Hunter-Gatherers in Southern China, 18 000-3000 BC
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Chinese archaeologists refer variously to the period from the Late Pleistocene into the Early Holocene in southern China as Mesolithic, Post-Palaeolithic, Palaeolithic to Neolithic transition, or Early Neolithic...
Opening the Mediterranean: Assyria, the Levant and the Transformation of Early Iron Age Trade
Introduction The evidence for structures of exchange in the Early Iron Age Mediterranean has been rationalised in many ways, variable in terms of both the evidence selected and the arguments applied. However, the most pervasive and tenacious explanation...
Prospects: Archaeological Research and Practice in Peru
The following comments reflect on the present state of Peruvian-led research archaeology and irs prospects for the future, from the viewpoint of a friend, colleague but notably as an outsider. As such this piece is informed by both personal experience...
Sanyangzhuang: Early Farming and a Han Settlement Preserved beneath Yellow River Flood Deposits
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The Han Dynasty (202 BC-AD 220) administered one of the world's great empires, rivalling its western contemporary, Rome. Much is known about the Han from contemporary histories and from recent archaeology,...
Soilscapes and Settlements: Remote Mapping of Activity Areas in Unexcavated Prehistoric Farmsteads
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction With every new methodological or theoretical development, archaeologists are confronted with new opportunities, and quite often with problems they had not imagined. In mitigation archaeology, financial pressure...
Space and Movement in an Iron Age Oppidum: Integrating Geophysical and Topographic Survey at Entremont, Provence
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The degree to which urbanisation in the indigenous societies of temperate Europe was a direct reflection of Mediterranean prototypes is a recurrent question in Iron Age studies. The organisation of social space...
The Chalcolithic of the near East and South-Eastern Europe: Discoveries and New Perspectives from the Cave Complex Areni-1, Armenia
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The current perception of Chalcolithic societies of the Middle East, Central Asia, and many parts of south-eastern Europe dating to c. 5000-3000 BC is shaped by more than a century of excavations at numerous...
The Oldest Maritime Sanctuary? Dating the Sanctuary at Keros and the Cycladic Early Bronze Age
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The world's earliest sanctuaries are getting older. The remarkable symbolic centre at Gosbekli Tepe in eastern Turkey (Schmidt 2007) dates from the Early Holocene period (some 11 000 years ago); sites in coastal...