Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 86, No. 334, December

Agro-Urban Landscapes: The Example of Maya Lowland Cities
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction In most regions of the world people have organised space in ways that can be recognised as distinctly urban. Yet different urban experiments have given rise to a remarkable spatial diversity that is often overlooked...
Bayes versus Pragmatism: A Debate about Dating Hawaiian Temples
Hawaiian temples and Bayesian chronology [T]he chronological development of the Kohala, Kona, Waimea, Kahikinui, and Kalaupapa field systems, spanning three islands, is remarkably congruent. While there was some low intensity land use in Kohala...
Books Received
The list includes all books received between 1 June and 1 September 2012. Those featuring at the beginning of New Book Chronicle have, however, not been duplicated in this list. The listing of a book in this chronicle does not preclude its subsequent...
Confirmation of the First Neolithic Rondel-Type Enclosure in Poland
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Nature of the rondels The first excavations of early fifth-millennium Central European Neolithic circular ditched enclosures of the rondel-type took place over a century ago. Nevertheless, it is only within the last 25...
Dealul Guran: Evidence for Lower Palaeolithic (MIS 11) Occupation of the Lower Danube Loess Steppe
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Background South-eastern Europe features consistently in models of hominin colonisation of the continent. It is the geographic point at which northward migration routes out of Africa through the Near East meet eastern ones...
Desert Labyrinth: Lines, Landscape and Meaning at Nazca, Peru
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Landscapes are concepts as well as physical places. As we move through them we engage our social and cultural precepts, inventing and elaborating, emphasising or disregarding natural features, and bestowing...
Editorial
In praise of reviewers When I was young and foolish (and addicted to Yeats and Joyce) I would send my poetry to those ephemeral plain-cover magazines that proliferated after the war, with names like Saris and Stand, and count the hours and months...
Excavating in Breccia: New Methods Developed at the Benzu Rockshelter
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Breccia is a densely consolidated material consisting of angular fragments of rock cemented in a matrix (Loucks 1999; Loucks & Mescher 2001). Sedimentary breccias typically form within and on the talus...
Immigration and Transhumance in the Early Bronze Age Carpathian Basin: The Occupants of a Kurgan
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The transformation from Late Copper to Early Bronze Age societies in the Carpathian Basin, from the final fourth to the mid third millennium BC, and the roles of locals and incomers, remains controversial....
Kindling Interest?
KENNETH AITCHISON. Breaking new ground: how professional archaeology works. 528 Kindle pages (estimated), 3 figures, 31 tables. 2012. Sheffield: Landward Research; 978-0-9572452-0-4, e-book (Kindle edition) 2.79 [pounds sterling]. Is Kindle an effective...
Macrofractures on Bone-Tipped Arrows: Analysis of Hunter-Gatherer Arrows in the Fourie Collection from Namibia
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The origin of projectile technology is a hotly debated topic (see Knecht 1997; Brooks et al. 2006; Shea 2006; Villa & Lenoir 2006; Backwell et al. 2008; Lombard & Parsons 2008; Sisk & Shea 2009;...
Mancala at the Pyramids of Meroe
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The term mancala refers to a group of games commonly played on a space marked out by two parallel rows of shallow depressions, between which two players move small stones, shells or seeds (Figure 1). Examples...
Middle Holocene Intensification and Domestication of Camelids in North Argentina, as Tracked by Zooarchaeology and Lithics
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Two topics that have captured the global interest of the scientific community are the processes of intensification and domestication, issues that necessitate consideration of the evidence at local and regional...
M.R. James and the Archaeological Uncanny
It is thus seen that nothing is safe in this imperfect world, and that antiquaries, above all men, had better be careful. Mediaeval scrapbooks, Saxon crowns, unauthorized glimpses into the past, the treasures of Abbots, and interesting whistles picked...
New Evidence for the Processing of Wild Cereal Grains at Ohalo II, a 23 000-Year-Old Campsite on the Shore of the Sea of Galilee, Israel
Introduction The site of Ohalo II, located on the south-western shore of the Sea of Galilee in Israel, was a fisher-hunter-gatherer campsite dating to about 23 000 years ago (Nadel et al. 1995; Nadel 2002). Immediate and quick submergence of the...
Recognising Strategies for Conquered Territories: A Case Study from the Inka North Calchaqui Valley
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction One intriguing question in the study of early empires is how they controlled their subjects and maintained their domination (see Alcock et al. 2001). This article explores methods of colonisation and legitimacy,...
Stonehenge Remodelled
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Since the early years of the twentieth century it has been recognised that Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire, UK, was a long-lived monument with several stages of construction. The publication in 1995...
Substantial Settlement in the European Early Mesolithic: New Research at Star Carr
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The pioneer settlers who reoccupied northern Europe towards the end of the Younger Dryas cold event and the start of the Holocene are considered to have lived in small, dispersed groups and to have been highly...
The Earliest Representations of Royal Power in Egypt: The Rock Drawings of Nag El-Hamdulab (Aswan)
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Sometime during the early 1890s, Archibald H. Sayce (1845-1933) made a sketch copy of a rock drawing at Gharb Aswan (Upper Egypt) that was subsequently included in a catalogue of inscriptions between Aswan...
The Romans: Dream or Nightmare?
'Sagalassos: city of dreams' was an exhibition inviting us to consider how archaeologists and their public make sense of archaeological discoveries. It is a topical theme. Shown at the Gallo-Roman Museum, Tongeren, Belgium, the exhibition displayed...
The Topographic and Environmental Context of the Earliest Village Sites in Western South Asia
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The topographical and environmental contexts of the earliest settlement sites in South Asia are critical factors for understanding the origins and spread of village-based farming. The specific locations of...