Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 87, No. 336, June

Acoustics of Historic Spaces as a Form of Intangible Cultural Heritage
The current state of research Archaeological interest in the study of the acoustics of important historic buildings is currently gaining in importance, and there are several areas where research is conducted. Among these I include music archaeology,...
A Day in the Life of an Ubaid Household: Archaeobotanical Investigations at Kenan Tepe, South-Eastern Turkey
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The Ubaid period in south-west Asia (7300-6100 BP) was a time of rapid political, economic and social change. The production of larger amounts of agricultural produce and privatisation of crop surpluses are...
Books Received
The list includes all books received between 1 December 2012 and 1 March 2013. Those featuring at the beginning of New Book Chronicle have, however, not been duplicated in this list. The listing of a book in this chronicle does not preclude its subsequent...
Butchering with Small Tools: The Implications of the Evron Quarry Assemblage for the Behaviour of Homo Erectus
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Small tools are emerging as a common element of the Early Stone Age/Lower Palaeolithic toolkit (Burdukiewicz & Ronen 2003). On Oldowan sites, including Omo 57, Omo 123, Wonderwerk Cave and Sterkfontein,...
Chronology of the Perishables: First AMS [sup.14]C Dates of Wooden Artefacts from Aeneolithic-Bronze Age Waterlogged Sites in the Trans-Urals, Russia
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Waterlogged sites are extremely important for archaeologists and palaeoecologists because they contain unique records of human occupation and corresponding environmental conditions. In Russia, waterlogged peat...
Complex Topography and Human Evolution: The Missing Link
Introduction There are many hypotheses about hominin environments (Ports 1998a, 2007), each drawing on different evolutionary theories and palaeoenvironmental data sets to characterise the selective regimes driving hominisation. They fall into two...
Digging Deeper in the Archaeological Psyche
Introduction In the last 25 years the individual has increasingly come to the fore in archaeology, for example in phenomenology, agency and somatic archaeology, and more recently we have been encouraged to be reflexive in our methodology, and to...
Editorial
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Bodies play a leading role in archaeology, providing insights into ritual and belief, into lifestyle and longevity, into diet and disease, and are a useful target for radiocarbon dating. The bodies...
Magdalenian Pioneers in the Northern French Alps, 17 000 Cal BP
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The colonisation of new territories by human groups is a new but important subject of research for the prehistorian. However, these processes can only be analysed in certain archaeological contexts with a rich...
Marking Resistance? Change and Continuity in the Recent Rock Art of the Southern Kimberley, Australia
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The classic painted images known as Wanjinas first appear in the last 2000 years and were actively repainted in many parts of the Kimberley into the late twentieth century (Blundell & Woolagoodja 2005;...
Monumental Ditched Enclosures in Southern Iberia (Fourth-Third Millennia BC)
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction In the process of deep landscape monumentalisation that took place during the Neolithisation of Western Europe and the millennia that followed (sixth-third millennia BC), the creation of circular enclosures,...
New Book Chronicle
With the change of Reviews Editor, it is entirely appropriate to express thanks--both personal and on behalf of the readers of Antiquity--to my predecessor, Madeleine Hummler. As well as commissioning around 500 book reviews and review articles, Madeleine...
Reconsideration of the Copper Age Chronology of the Eastern Carpathian Basin: A Bayesian Approach
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction In the 1950s, the chronology of the Copper Age in the Carpathian Basin was established indirectly, through correlations with cultural sequences in the Balkans and cross-dating with the Aegean and Troy (Banner...
Rethinking Early Iron Age Urbanisation in Central Europe: The Heuneburg Site and Its Archaeological Environment
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Centralisation and urbanisation processes north of the Alps Traditionally, Late Iron Age oppida have been considered to be the 'first cities north of the Alps' (Collis 1984; Wells 1984). However, large-scale research projects...
Sacred Landscapes of the South-Eastern USA: Prehistoric Rock and Cave Art in Tennessee
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction This paper concerns a complex prehistoric rock art tradition that has come to light over the past two decades in the Appalachian Plateau of south-eastern North America and is particularly well represented in...
Situating Megalithic Burials in the Iron Age-Early Historic Landscape of Southern India
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction "A thousand megalithic cists might be excavated with the utmost care [in south India] without any significant addition to our knowledge of their chronology" (Wheeler 1947: 185). The chronology of the Iron Age-Early...
The Development of Upper Palaeolithic China: New Results from the Shuidonggou Site
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction The replacement of archaic populations by anatomically modern humans, and the process of the Middle-Upper Palaeolithic transition in Eurasia during Oxygen Isotope Stage 3 (OIS 3) are heavily debated in the...
The First Towns in the Central Sahara
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Towns or cities are a defining characteristic of most complex polities. A multitude of definitions have been put forward, some favouring checklists of urban traits (most importantly Childe 1950; cf. Talbert...
'The King in the Car Park': New Light on the Death and Burial of Richard III in the Grey Friars Church, Leicester, in 1485
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introduction Richard III (1483-85) is probably England's most familiar medieval king. Immortalised by Shakespeare and others as an infamous villain, but with a strong cohort of modern-day supporters, he has remained a highly...
The Nordic Razor and the Mycenaean Lifestyle
Introduction Two types of razor are found in the European Bronze Age: one with a two-edged blade, which appears in the sixteenth century BC and the other with a single-edged blade, smooth back and horse-head handle, which appears in the fifteenth...
The Question of Prehistoric Silks in Europe
Introduction Silk was one of the iconic luxury items of the ancient world and was traded over extensive distances. Claims for silk textiles in Bronze Age and Iron Age contexts (late second to first millennia BC) in both temperate and Mediterranean...