E Magazine

A consumer magazine publishing news, information and commentary on environmental issues. Content includes international and domestic environmental news, feature articles, and a guide to green living. Addresses such subjects as recycling, food safety, air

Articles from Vol. 15, No. 4, July-August

Blackening the Skies: The Bush Administration Pushes Dirty Coal Plants
Why was the Lake Michigan coastal city of Manistee, population 6,600, targeted for a $700 million, 425 megawatt coal-powered electric power plant, the largest proposed in Michigan in two decades? And why, in the face of an abundance of electric power...
Buying Nemo
The popular animated movie Finding Nemo, a favorite in kids' video collections, traces the exploits of the young clownfish Nemo, who is captured by divers and plopped into a dentist office aquarium. But Nemo longs to return to the ocean and his father....
Caught in a Net: Fifteen Years after Exxon Valdez, Alaskan Fishermen Are Still Waiting for a Settlement
In a tiny bakery just across the street from the Fisherman's Memorial in Cordova, Alaska, Brian O'Neill is using a tablecloth--a laminated nautical chart of Prince William Sound--to diagram the worst environmental disaster in North American history....
Clean Energy Goes to College
There is a new wave of activism sweeping across college campuses. Student groups are coordinating efforts to reduce fossil-fuel dependency by pushing for more renewable alternatives, and putting forth specific goals for their colleges. "This is...
Easy Water Filtering: How to Choose an Optimal System
While it may be Earth's most precious resource, water certainly isn't treated as such. Americas drinking water is often exposed to chemical additives, sewage, pesticides, herbicides and sometimes toxic waste, leaving many consumers distrustful of the...
Everybody Hurts: The Natural Alternative to Prescription Pain Relief
Severe pain--caused by everything from lower back problems and migraines to a common toothache--sends most of us running to the doctor for a quick fix. Often, that relief comes in the form of a potent pain pill, such as OxyContin or Percocet. But those...
Frogs in Peril, Bug Zapper Mayhem, and the Artificial Reef Debate
I remember hearing that the world's frogs were in peril. How are they doing today?--Omar Khan, Columbus, IN According to Harvard biology professor Jim Hanken, "Overall, the status of frogs has definitely gotten worse. The problem is more serious...
Getting There: A Guide to Planet-Friendly Cars
As a nation, we love our cars. America invented the drive-in restaurant and the drive-in bank. NASCAR racing is one of the fastest-growing spectator sports in the U.S., and car magazines have millions of subscribers. We love our cars so much, that...
Greening the Conventions
The monthly meeting started precisely at 9:45 a.m. The agenda included five minutes on the press conference with the mayor, five minutes for waste management, 10 minutes on outreach. Was this a meeting for a government agency, or a community advocacy...
Green Menus: College Campuses Opt for Sustainable Dining
It took only a few weeks for the news to spread last fall: The food served at Yale University's Berkeley College dining hall was the best on campus. Students assigned to eat in the 11 other residential colleges (Yale's version of dorms) wanted in....
Green Partying
In 1989, at a pub called the Slug and Lettuce in Northern London, Edwin Datschefski was sitting with several of his green design colleagues when he noticed an enviro-minded acquaintance at a nearby table. As it turned out, the friend was sitting with...
Open Season on "Varmints": For Saving Endangered Prairie Dogs, It's the Eleventh Hour
"This is really what it's all about," Dan said. "I love being out here. Open, wild country. Fresh, clean air." So what was Dan doing? Hiking in the Sierras? Following the Appalachian Trail through Maine? Hell no, he was shooting prairie dogs in...
Operation Prairie Storm
Like the Bush administration's reaction following revelations of Iraqi prisoner abuse, some in the hunting community will undoubtedly dismiss the prairie dog "hunts" described in our cover story this issue as the work of "a few bad apples." Perhaps...
Overseas Mutual: Investing in Sustainability Abroad
For socially and environmentally responsible investors leery of putting more money into a still-lagging American economy, international mutual funds focusing on investments in green companies abroad are good options to help minimize risk while at the...
Prairie Bandits: On the Trail of the Black-Footed Ferret
While domestic ferrets are common pets, black-footed ferrets, (Mustela nigripes) are one of North America's most endangered mammals. Sometimes called "prairie bandits," nocturnal ferrets spend 70 to 80 percent of their time underground. Federal wildlife...
Protecting Thailand's Forests: Exploring the Village to Ministry Connection
More than a half million hill tribe members, nomadic for centuries, live without regard to modern political boundaries in scattered villages throughout the broadleaf forest mountains of northern Thailand, Myanmar, and the famous Golden Triangle region...
Que Se-Raw, Se-Raw: Is Uncooked Food the Next Big Thing?
The smell of fresh-baked bread or sizzling onions may soon go the way of the dodo in some American kitchens. Will the oven itself become a passe appliance as increasing numbers of health-conscious individuals decide to eat most of their food uncooked?...
Shooting "Varmints" Decimates a Prairie Dog Colony
"There's shooters over there," Kim says suddenly. Immediately, the rest of us look east, where she is pointing, across the flat open land of the Montana prairie, dotted with sage brush and cacti, toward rolling hills and a stand of cottonwood trees....
The Quiet Paradise: Getting Away from It All in the Cook Islands
Imagine a South Pacific paradise, steeped in the 18th century history of Captain James Cook and William Bligh of Mutiny on the Bounty fame. You can almost smell fragrant frangipani blossoms, taste sweet papayas and feel cool breezes. Now add to that...
Wasting the West: How Welfare Ranchers and Their Livestock Are Damaging Public Land
Twenty years ago, much of the public land around the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona resembled the barren and desolate landscape found in a Sub-Saharan desert. For years, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) had granted grazing permits...