E Magazine

A consumer magazine publishing news, information and commentary on environmental issues. Content includes international and domestic environmental news, feature articles, and a guide to green living. Addresses such subjects as recycling, food safety, air

Articles from Vol. 8, No. 2, March-April

Against the Grain: Recycled Wood Is Showing Up in the Best Houses
Most of the trees harvested in the U.S. don't get made into paper; they're used by the home building industry. In 1995, Americans built 1.3 million new houses, with the average single-family home using more than 15,000 board feet of lumber, according...
Choosing to Recycle - Because It Pays
Recycled material isn't just in Greenpeace backpacks anymore - it's in many of the everyday products we buy at the mall and supermarket. Plastics, metals and glass now routinely take a second - or even third - trip through our consumer society. These...
Dialing for Dolphins: Activist Phone Companies Give to the Cause and Reduce Rates, Too
The FAX machine, the World Wide Web and email - all tied to telephone lines - have made possible a revolution in American work habits. The convenience and cost savings of working from home means even the environmentally unaware are increasingly trading...
Dr. Allen Hershkowitz: Waist Deep in Garbage
Dr. Allen Hershkowitz, senior scientist at The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), has spent the last 20 years up to his neck in garbage. The former INFORM researcher, advisor to the World Bank, the U.N. and several Environmental Protection Agency...
Male Breast Cancer?
Yes, and Environmental Exposure Is Implicated In 1988, John Connole, of Bristol, Connecticut was diagnosed with breast cancer. Less than a year later, after recovering from the shock of her husband contracting a disease usually associated with women,...
Manatee Mania: Is Florida Loving Its Endangered Marine Mammals to Death?
"Once you've met a manatee, you're hooked," reads the Citrus County, Florida tourist brochure. "They're blubbery, yet lovable. They're big, yet friendly." This Disney theme park view of a unique American treasure (its closest relative is the elephant)...
Mapping the Future: With GIS Environmental System, the Proof Is in the Plotting
At the front lines of environmentalism, often the first and biggest challenge is proving that there is a problem. The systematic environmental poisoning Rachel Carson described in Silent Spring made headlines nearly 50 years ago because it was exceptionally...
Piling It On: Are Your Carpets Harboring Health Hazards?
When the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) came down with "sick building syndrome" in its Washington, D.C. headquarters back in 1988, the irony was lost on no one. Health problems there erupted after installation of new carpeting, but the cause was...
Putt Putt: The Small Gas Engine Is an Environmental Nightmare
Most summer weekends, a few million people use them to mow lawns, trim hedges, blow leaves or cut up firewood. Millions more use them to buzz over waterways and lakes in jet skis or motorboats. In the winter, people in the colder climates roar along...
Recycling the Army Way: The Pentagon Uses Radioactive Waste as Armor and Bullets
As many as 700,000 American soldiers served in the 1991 Persian Gulf war, but it wasn't until last year that the Pentagon finally admitted that some of those servicemen and women may have been exposed to chemical weapons. Deborah Edwards didn't serve...
Talking Trash
Recycling Is Under Attack (By the Usual Suspects), But Its Stunning Successes Outweigh Its Modest Setbacks You pull out that jar of old spaghetti sauce from the back of the refrigerator. You find green fuzzy stuff all around the inside rim, take a whiff...
These Frogs Don't Turn into Princes
A disturbing wildlife phenomenon has turned up throughout the Great Lakes region, from Minnesota to Quebec: deformed frogs. Since August of 1995, researchers have found malformed frogs at more than 174 sites in 54 of Minnesota's 87 counties, prompting...
The Ties That Blind: Big Oil Goes Hunting for Electric Cars in California
It was 8 a.m., September 16, 1996... and the red light was on in the studio of KSFO-AM in San Francisco. "Hot Talk" host Lee Rogers was doing his best to get his drivetime listeners (who breathe the worst air in the United States) charged up by hurling...
The Unquiet Oceans: Undersea Noise Experiments Threaten the Sensitive Hearing - and Communications - of Marine Mammals
Anyone who has ducked beneath the surface of the ocean is familiar with the sensation. The screech of gulls, the laughter of children in the surf, even the distant whine of pleasure craft are all shut out for the moment. But, in fact, the oceans are...