E Magazine

A consumer magazine publishing news, information and commentary on environmental issues. Content includes international and domestic environmental news, feature articles, and a guide to green living. Addresses such subjects as recycling, food safety, air

Articles from Vol. 16, No. 5, September-October

A Green Agenda for Cities
The United Nations, so accustomed to thinking globally, turned its hopes this year to local governments' efforts to clean up the environment. More than 70 mayors and other local leaders from around the world have signed the Urban Environmental Accords,...
As Falls Yosemite Falls
For many of the three million people a year who visit Yosemite National Park, its eponymous falls are the most dramatic--and most accessible--site. Not only is this the highest waterfall in North America (and the fifth-highest in the world), it's visible...
Bursting Your Balloons and Caring for Pets
Why is it bad for the environment to release balloons into the air? --George Young, New York, NY Given that "what goes up must come down;' balloons released into the air--whether by accident or in large quantities at events--eventually end up as...
Buying Cleaner Energy: Few People Realize the Potential
Turning off unused lights, insulating your house and buying energy-efficient appliances are all great ways to save energy, which decreases air pollution and saves you money in the process. And if everyone were truly conservation-minded, we would save...
Can Save the Cities?
Wausau, Wisconsin may seem like the furthest thing from a global mega-city, but the forces in play in this small city are echoes of the worldwide issues of population and immigration. Over the past decades Wausau has received a large influx of Hmong,...
Cities of the Future: Today's "Mega-Cities" Are Overcrowded and Environmentally Stressed
We take big cities for granted today, but they are a relatively recent phenomenon. Most of human history concerns rural people making a living from the land. But the world is rapidly urbanizing, and it's not at all clear that our planet has the resources...
Citizen Scientists: Romping through the Swamp-For a Good Cause
Never learned the difference between mitochondria and monotremes? No matter--you may still have a shot at a side career in science. These days, conservation organizations and government agencies are increasingly turning to average citizens to help...
Everything Gives You Cancer: But Good Lifestyle Choices Will Help You Fight It Off
Imagine inviting 12 friends to a dinner party--six men and six women. Look around the room and consider this: sometime in the future, two of the women and three of the men will develop cancer. Depressing as it seems, those are the odds we all must...
Green Glass: Stylish Window Treatments Help Clear the Air
There's that draft of wind again, and this time it was strong. You head toward the thermostat and turn the heat up some more. But that won't solve your problem. According to the Department of Energy (DOE), 25 percent of the energy used to heat and...
L.A. Environmental: Hollywood's Best and Worst "Green" Movies
Name the speaker: "How many oil spills can we endure? Millions and millions of gallons of oil are now destroying the oceans and the many forms of life they support. Among these is plankton, which supplies 60 to 90 percent of the Earth's oxygen, and...
Looking at Lula: Brazil's Amazon Deforestation Worsens-Despite a "Green" President
Because no one can really picture just how vast 10,000 square miles is, those who talk about the Amazon region have found a handier way to illustrate the scale of rainforest destruction. The total area deforested over the years, for instance, was once...
Native Dumping Ground
The scent of sage and the pounding hooves of abundant wild game are a memory to the Skull Valley Band of Goshute Shoshone Indians in Utah, an hour from Salt Lake City. Today, when the people look north from their 18,000-acre reservation, they smell...
Poverty Is Terrorism
If our "mega-cities" coverage in this issue doesn't convince our readers and the substantial audience of international politicians and journalists also receiving it that the world has much bigger problems on its hands than terrorism, then I don't know...
Saving Sealife
In the spring of 1984, Peter Wallerstein received a phone call about an adult whale and her calf struggling to free themselves from the cutting confines of a gill net. Many of his previous phone calls to the Los Angeles city, authorities had gone unanswered,...
The Asian Invasion: Uncovering the Secrets of the Far East Diet
Asian food is everywhere. Cheap packets of ramen noodles make up a large portion of a typical college student s diet. Green tea is a common sight on grocery store shelves, not only as a drink but also as a dietary supplement. Egg rolls, wonton soup...
The Hundred Year War: Fighting to Save Hetch Hetchy-Again
When Congress passed the Raker Act in 1913, granting San Francisco the right to flood the Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park to bring water and hydroelectric power to a city devastated by the earthquake and fires of 1906, it was supposed...
Trekking for Change: Vietnam's Hill Tribes Benefit from Ecotourism
High on a mountain in northern Vietnam, the fertile wealth of forests and paddies belies the poverty of the people who live among them. Most houses are thin screens of wood with mud floors and no doors. Chickens and pigs wander in and out of the kitchens,...
Whale Falls: It's Not Just a Carcass, It's Dinner
It isn't easy, towing a dead whale out to sea and trying to sink it to the bottom of the ocean. Just ask Craig Smith. "The largest we sunk was about 30 tons, and that was a gray whale, and very challenging," recalls Smith, a professor of biological...