E Magazine

A consumer magazine publishing news, information and commentary on environmental issues. Content includes international and domestic environmental news, feature articles, and a guide to green living. Addresses such subjects as recycling, food safety, air

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 4, July-August

Conservation from Above
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Our Cessna 210 takes off between two gas drilling rigs standing sentinel over the end of the runway at the small airport in Rifle, Colorado. "I am always a little worried about those when the weather is marginal," says our...
Cover Up: Blocking Rays with Sun-Protective Clothing
The most effective method of avoiding undue sun exposure is to stay indoors, but most of us love the sun too much. Does chemical sunscreen or sunblock provide a solution? Not likely, says Harvey Schakowsky, owner of Solar Protective Factory, a Madison,...
Dreams of Gold and Green: U.S. Olympic Athletes Push Environmental Causes
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] An eerie metallic sound swells as U.S. Olympic swimmer Tara Kirk poises on the pool's edge. Her leg muscles tense, and, in a flash, she and the other swimmers dive beneath the water. "It's said our fastest racers swim like...
Finding Grace in Dominica: A Yoga Getaway in a Tropical Paradise
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Three weeks after returning from a yoga retreat on the Caribbean island of Dominica, I saw one of the other trip participants. She smiled broadly and said she was still feeling high from our weeklong stay at the Jungle Bay...
Fixing the Animal Farms: An Interview with Robert Martin
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Late last April, the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production (PCIFAP) released the findings from its 2 1/2-year study on the current state of the meat industry, called "Putting Meat on the Table: Industrial Farm...
Follow the Salesmen: How Industry Insiders Challenged the Car Lobby
Chuck Frank is the son of a man who billed himself as "The World's Largest Chevy Dealer." But Frank never wanted to sell cars. As a boy, his favorite pastimes were camping and fishing. He wanted an outdoor career, but that seemed impossible for a kid...
Healing Headaches: Drug-Free Remedies for One of the Most Common Medical Complaints
According to the American Headache Society, 90 percent of people have at least one headache per year. With $1 billion dollars spent annually on over-the-counter headache medications, it's clearly a big, throbbing problem. But simply popping a painkiller...
Making a Life: Redefining Success and Rediscovering Joy
Adapted from the book ECOpreneuring: Putting Purpose and the Planet Before Profits (New Society Publishers) Life offers more than a paycheck, corner office and promotional title. In fact, many of us are working ourselves to death. For many people,...
Movin' on Up: Condos Get a Green Makeover
Green condominium projects may be the most environmentally responsible housing on the market today. By their nature, condominiums are dense developments that take up less room and help preserve open space. Primarily urban, green condos are often sited...
New Life for Flights and Fabrics
Dear EarthTalk: Are there any efforts underway to green the air travel industry? It seems to me that it must be one dirty business from a pollution standpoint.--Elias Corey, Seattle, WA Air pollution from commercial, jets is a growing concern among...
Plastic Industry Strikes Back
Following San Francisco's lead, other cities with plastic bag woes are now considering their own bans on single-use bags in grocery and drug stores. But when the progressive town of Fairfax, California--population just over 7,00--decided to ban plastic...
Relearning to Recycle: Streamlining the Process (and Reaping Rewards) with RecycleBank
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] It costs Connecticut towns $72 to haul one ton of trash to a landfill. Last year, Hartford produced 109,000 tons. In an effort to curb the capitol's waste accumulation, Mayor Eddie Perez is launching a new recycling program,...
Sorting through Sadness: The High Cost of Recycling at a Cambodian Landfill
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Those who live there call it "Smokey Mountain." Officially, it's the Steung Meanchey landfill in Cambodia, the city dump for Phnom Penh, a 100-acre mountain of waste where some 2,000 registered workers, including 600 children,...
The Cow in the Living Room
I politely passed on the offer of a bison burger at a recent Ted Turner-hosted fundraising event I attended in New York City (no, I'm not a donor--we were invited as press). But I couldn't resist a wisecrack and a wink to the server that it was only...
The Meat of the Matter: Our Livestock Industry Creates More Greenhouse Gas Than Transportation Does
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Ask most Americans about what causes global warming, and they'll point to a coal plant smokestack or a car's tailpipe. They're right, of course, but perhaps two other images should be granted similarly iconic status: the front...
The Reel Downfall of Reefs: Controlling Fishing to Save the Coral Reefs
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Across the world coral reefs are dying because of over-fishing. It is the fish which protect the reefs from excessive algae, the main culprit in coral death. For over a millennium, inhabitants of small islands who depended...
Think before You Eat: The Widespread Effects of Factory-Farmed Meat
One of the most stalwart defenders of factory farming in America is the National Cattlemen's Beef Association, and it's none too happy that the United Nations has concluded that the environment pays a heavy price for our addiction to meat (see main...
Tracking Your Footprint
Online carbon calculators show the relative size of one's carbon footprint and how simple lifestyle choices--say, switching to high-efficiency lightbulbs or taking mass transit--can dramatically decrease your contribution to climate change. "The goals...
Tuning in Slowly
In April of 1991, National Public Radio (NPR) began running a regular environmentally focused news segment called "Living on Earth." NPR was the first major news outlet to take environmental news seriously. According to Bruce Gellerman, a longtime...
Where the Wild Things Are: Foraging for the Season's Best-Kept Secrets
In our 21st century supermarket culture, we've come to trust only packaged products. But just a century ago, plants we consider weeds--like purslane, sorrel and dandelions--were a regular part of the diet. Wild things grow all around us: in woods and...