The Humanist

The Humanist is a magazine focusing on critical inquiry and social concern from a humanist perspective. Published by the American Humanist Association, The Humanist covers everything from science and religion to politics and popular culture.

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 2, March-April

Against the Grain
George Bush's Christmas Eve pardon of Iran-contra sleazes Capar Weinberger, Eliott Abrams, Oliver North, Clair George, and Alan Fiers was timed to bury the story beneath the inevitable reprints of "Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus." With the help...
All the Babies You Can Eat
One of the more encouraging signs of a revitalized feminist movement was the rebirth of Ms. magazine. Shunning advertising and trying to draw upon a wider and more varied approach to feminism, Ms. promised to provide a good mix of solid reporting,...
Chelsea Goes to School
Bill and Hillary, an Arkansas couple newly residing in Washington, D.C., chose in January to enroll their daughter Chelsea in an excellent, pricey Quaker private school - Sidwell Friends. This decision has evoked considerable comment, as Bill is the...
Isaac Asimov: A One-Man Renaissance
When Isaac Asimov died on April 6, 1992, the national media poured forth a flood of praise in celebration of his indisputable genius. He was called a "twentieth-century Renaissance man" and the "Great Explainer." While not the most prolific writer...
Just Another Girl on the I.R.T
With the critical and commercial success of Boyz N the Hood, Straight Out of Brooklyn, Juice, New Jack City, and other films made by young black directors reflecting black urban life, films by and about young black women would seem inevitable. (Then...
Leap of Faith
With the critical and commercial success of Boyz N the Hood, Straight Out of Brooklyn, Juice, New Jack City, and other films made by young black directors reflecting black urban life, films by and about young black women would seem inevitable. (Then...
Nagugi Wa Thiong'o and the Politics of Language
Ngugi wa Thiong'o and the Politics of Language I am concerned with moving the centre . . . from its assumed location in the West to a multi-plicity of spheres in an the cultures of the world. {This} will contribute to the freeing of...
Not in My Name
It is 12:30 Am on Tuesday morning, January 5, 1993. Just minutes ago, in the gallows room at the Walla Walla state penitentiary, officials of Washington state placed a black hood over the head and shoulders of convicted child rapist and murderer Westley...
The Evolution of Secular Judaism
Because religion is usually considered an essential part of Jewish identity, the concept of a secular, humanistic Judaism is puzzling to many people. Briefly put, secular Judaism is an identification with Jewish history and culture as the primary aspect...
The Humanism of Albert Schweitzer
There is no disputing the world's acclaim of Dr. Albert Schweitzer as one of the greatest humanitarians of the twentieth century. Here was a man who in the 90 years of his productive life, had earned doctorates in the fields of philosophy, theology,...
The Legacy of Isaac Asimov
He has died, but so very much of what he was and believed and valued will five as long as there are people to read and think and wonder. This is largely because, during his lifetime, Isaac Asimov made a major contribution to solving one of the most...
The Vatican and World Population Policy: An Interview with Milton P. Siegel
There is a growing consensus among international public, health leaders that the gains made by their earliest practitioners are about to be lost as a result of overpopulation. The hideous scourge of premature death in Africa that we have been witnessing...
Welcome to Virtual Reality
During the last two years, I have talked about the virtues and vices of new technologies on many radio talk shows and before live audiences. The public always gets the most excited when I discuss virtual reality. Let us see why. Perhaps you would...
Why Africa Stays Poor: And Why It Doesn't Have To
The images are so familiar that we have become all but inured to them: starving African children outlined against a broad expense of empty sky; ragged, impoverished families huddled together on a stony steppe. They could be Biafrans in 1968, Sahelians...