CineAction

An academic journal that examines film from a variety of viewpoints, with each issue focused on a central theme. Publishes scholarly articles on film theory, plus interviews with filmmakers, film reviews, book reviews, and reports from international film

Articles from No. 78, Winter

Free Films Made Freely: Paolo Gioli and Experimental Filmmaking in Italy
As a premise for my way of making films and working with film, the most important thing is the movie-camera understood almost as a laboratory (for the shooting and printing of films) ... I express my love for the cinema through the movie-camera; in...
Hop on Pop: Jiangshi Films in a Transnational Context
On e How.com, an instructional website with the tagline "How to Do just About Everything," one finds the following article: "How to Defeat a Chinese Hopping Vampire." Listed are 5 easy steps for anyone who should encounter such a being. They are as...
It Doesn't Seem 'Canadian': Quality Television' and Canadian-American Co-Productions
Flashpoint: One Moment Changes Everything Flashpoint, the English-Canadian (1) one-hour scripted drama about an elite police tactical unit, can be considered the manifestation of a particular moment in Canadian television history. It is a moment...
Screening the Borderland: Transsexualism as Cinematic Metaphor
Transsexuals are individuals born with the physiological and chromosomal identity of one gender, but who mentally and emotionally believe they belong to the opposite gender. They consider their condition a mistake of nature, a congenital anomaly. The...
Second City or Second Country? the Question of Canadian Identity in SCTV'S Transcultural Text
Take off, eh? When SCTV began broadcasting its programming day on September 21, 1976, Canadian viewers were introduced to a new brand of television satire that would develop and grow with the show for its eight-year run. Between 1976 and 1984, SCTV...
Slumdog Comprador: Coming to Terms with the Slumdog Phenomenon
Every time a film made by a Western director about India gains critical acclaim in the West, two related phenomena seem to also occur: the greatest hits of negative stereotypes are brought out and served up in the film (think poverty, squalor and general...
Still Mining His Winnipeg: An Interview with Guy Maddin
Part expressionistic city symphony film, part mischievous autobiographical reminisce, Guy Maddin's My Winnipeg (2007) served as something of a culmination of much of his work this decade. Like the mock memoir Cowards Bend the Knee (2003) and the teen...
The New James Bond: And Globalization Theory, Inside and Out
As almost every magazine, newspaper, radio, and television film critic has noticed, the new James Bond is different from the old James Bond; he is more serious, more muscular, and less witty. (1) But beyond such cosmetic character traits that came...
Torture Porn and Bodies Politic: Post-Cold War American Perspectives in Eli Roth's Hostel and Hostel: Part II
During the press tour for his directorial debut, Cabin Fever (2003), American horror filmmaker Eli Roth compared his $1.5 million independent film to the 1980s American horror films of his youth: "By the end of the decade, horror had literally become...
Who Wants to Be a Screenwriter? Script Development in Globalizing India
A writer who wants to become a film scriptwriter must not have an ego; he must be on call at any time of the day and night; and he must have the skill of putting together the most absurd ideas into a proper story, with all or most ingredients to make...
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