CineAction

An academic journal that examines film from a variety of viewpoints, with each issue focused on a central theme. Publishes scholarly articles on film theory, plus interviews with filmmakers, film reviews, book reviews, and reports from international film

Articles from No. 64, Spring

Indigenous Feature Films: A New Hope for National Cinemas?
As an observer of the cinemas of Canada, Australia and New Zealand, I have recently been struck by the unprecedented success of indigenous feature films from these three nations. Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner (Zacharias Kunuk, 2002), Rabbit-Proof Fence...
Korean Cinema Now: Balancing Creativity and Commerce in an Emergent National Industry
Introduction Some of the most exciting developments in both artistic and commercial terms during the first few years of the new millennium can be found in Korean cinema. (1) With two films in competition at the Cannes International Film Festival...
New Directions?
The conceit of the question mark added to "New Directions?" was intended to open up the line of possible inquiry rather than frame it too narrowly. As well, I wanted to set up a series of doubts rather than certainties about the state of film and filmmaking...
Striking Home: Trends and Changes in Vietnamese Cinema
Not bad for a cadre-dominated movie industry in which the People's Army runs the major studio and one of last year's acclaimed films is titled, Hai Binh Builds a Hydropower Plant. (1) --TIME/Asia (Hanoi), commenting on Bar Girls (Gay Nhai), a 2003...
Takashi Miike's Cinema of Outrage
Despite Western art cinema audiences' appreciation of canonical works of Japanese cinema as represented by Akira Kurosawa, Kenji Mizoguchi, and Yasujiro Ozu, most devotees tend to forget that a popular cinema existed during the same period,...
The Passion of Global Hollywood: Ivansxtc
It occurred to him that what had previously seemed to him a downright impossibility, that he had lived his whole life not as he should, could actually be true. It occurred to him that his barely recognized promptings to fight against what people...
The Politics of Hiccups: National Cinema without National Language
1. The End of Eastern and Central European Historical Allegory Films from Eastern and Central Europe (1) are rarely discussed outside the national-cinema framework. They are reputed to have a unique regional sensibility: a tragic or ironic preoccupation...
Two Stories, One Right, One Wrong: Narrative, National Identity and Globalization in Sliding Doors
Sliding Doors (Peter Howitt, 1997) was one of several films to emerge in the late 90s that showed two or more versions of the same narrative. It presented alternate incarnations of its protagonist, Helen/Gwyneth Paltrow as though they existed in parallel...
Where Globalization and Localization Meet: Spike Lee's the 25th Hour
Spike Lee's The 25th Hour was the first feature film to acknowledge the attacks on the World Trade Center. In bearing witness to the devastation at ground zero and the memorials that appeared all over the city, another filmmaker might have worried...
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