Geographical

The monthly magazine of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers. Covers a broad range of subjects related to geography in articles on people, places, cultures, adventure, responsible travel, history, science, and the envir

Articles from Vol. 77, No. 7, July

2005 RGS-IBG Award Winners
Each year, the Society presents a series of medals and awards that recognise excellence in a wide variety of areas relating to geography and the understanding of our world. This year's honours were announced and presented at our annual general meeting...
A Clash of Cultures: While Recent Events Suggest a Shift towards Freer Forms of Governance in the Middle East, the Prospects for Democracy in the Region Appear Bleak
Which would you like first, the good news or the bad news? That's the question democracy advocates have been asking in recent months, as events in the Middle East have begun to suggest a shift toward freer forms of government across the region. ...
Alexandra David-Neel (1868-1967): The First Foreign Woman to Enter Lhasa, the Forbidden Capital of Tibet, Alexandra David-Neel Helped to Bring Eastern Philosophies to the West
What was her background? Louise Eugenie Alexandrine Marie David was born in Saint-Mande, France, in 1868. Her father was a French teacher and political activist. She grew up in Brussels, where her parents moved when she was six. She returned...
Best of a Bad Bunch? Given That It Failed in Both Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, Is Democracy Really the Best Available System for the Governance of Modern Societies?
Democracy was never intended to rule nations. At its first appearance, in the city-state of Athens in 507 BC, the term was often applied pejoratively by aristocratic critics expressing their disdain for the common people--the demos--who had usurped...
Counting the Cost of Global Development
EDITORIAL The future of many of the world's natural resources--from rainforests to reefs--is marred by uncertainty. The release of the UN's Millennium Ecosystem Assessment in April drew attention to the fact that over the past 50 years, humans have...
Cowboys of the Andes
ECUADOR Cattle farming is big business in Ecuador. And every year between October and January, thousands of head of cattle that have been grazing on the paramo grasslands in the shadow of the Andes are rounded up and brought into the ranch. Despite...
Democracy in Crisis? Although 119 Countries Hold Free Elections, Only 89 of Those Are Considered 'Free' Societies. Democracy, It Seems, Relies upon More Than Just a Ballot Box
Sit back and imagine a country ruled by a regime supported by a mere fifth of the electorate. Now think of another country in which a presidential candidate has gained power despite losing the popular vote. If you're thinking about African states rent...
Democracy: With Tony Blair Taking Office for a Record Third Time, Popular Revolutions in the Former Soviet Union and a New Government in Iraq, Victoria James Ponders the State of Modern Democracy
Planted as a seed in the city states of classical Greece 2,500 years ago, democracy--literally 'rule (kratia) by the people (demos)'--has blossomed only in the past century. In 1900, there wasn't a single nation that could truly lay claim to being...
Flying into the Field
Airfares are often one of the biggest expenses for geographers conducting overseas fieldwork. Nevertheless, every good geographer knows that there's no substitute for hands-on work in the field. In order to help them get there, the Royal Geographical...
Geographical Young Geographer of the Year 2005: One Thousand Aspiring Geographers, One Question: Is the UK in 2005 Overpopulated? Competition Judge Rex Walford Reflects on Some of the Best of This Year's Young Geographer of the Year Entries
"To what extent is overpopulation about statistics, and how much is it about state of mind?" asked 14-year-old Emma Lewis of the Thomas Hardye School, Dorchester, in the first sentence of her entry in the Geographical Young Geographer of the Year competition....
Jamling Tenzing Norgay Is the Son of Tenzing Norgay, Who, Together with Edmund Hillary, Was the First Man to Reach the Summit of Mount Everest
Jamling Tenzing Norgay is the son of Tenzing Norgay, who, together with Edmund Hillary, was the first man to reach the summit of Mount Everest. Following in his father's footsteps, Jamling climbed Everest in 1996, two weeks after eight other climbers...
Living with Lions: Conflict between Lions and Pastoralists Has Seen the King of Beasts Come off Second Best. Geordie Torr Travels to Kenya to See How Traditional Methods Are Enabling These Bitter Enemies to Coexist
The kill was fresh--a small buffalo calf. The vehicle ahead, tracking the female lion that was almost certainly responsible for reducing the calf to little more than a haunch, continued to drive away, so we decided it was safe to get out and inspect...
Mountain Life in Bolivia
BOLIVIA The photographs in this month's archive come from one source and, compared with much of the material held at the Royal Geographical Society, they aren't very old. Previously unpublished, they are from a single album of 38 images that probably...
On the Trail of Che Guevara: As South America's Poorest Country, Bolivia Isn't Known for Its Thriving Tourism Industry. but This May All Be about to Change Thanks to a New Community-Run Attraction Inspired by the World's Favourite Revolutionary. David Atkinson Travels to Bolivia's Steamy Tropical Lowlands to Find out More
Towards the end of 1967, Che Guevara gained a new nickname: Fernando the Tooth Extractor. It was the final days of his attempt to start a peasant uprising in rural Bolivia and daily life for his group of guerrillas had become so grim that he had to...
Pastoralists under Pressure: For Hundreds of Years, the Borana People of Southern Ethiopia Have Reared Cattle on the Arid Plains Close to the Kenyan Border According to a Traditional Form of Land Management. Now, However, External Pressures Are Threatening to Destroy Their Way of Life
Dust fills the air, kicked up by the long line of camels and cattle trudging towards a deep well from which drifts the sound of men singing. Rising from the well's depths is a human chain, whose links pass buckets up and down in time with the singing....
Quizzical: Geographical's Resident Know-It-All Chris Edwards Spills the Beans on Fresh Air in Aeroplanes, the Shape of Jordan, the Death Penalty, the Extent of the Earth's Farmland and What That Nasty Smell Is in Namibia
global population watch The world population at the Time of going to press was according to: the United Nations 6,533,428,288 the CIA 6,464,308,527 the US Bureau of the Census 6,446,131,400 How do you get fresh air into a plane?...
Rabies: Medical Advice from Jason Gibbs, Head Pharmacist at Nomad Travel Stores and Health Clinics
Rabies is a viral illness that can affect the central nervous system of any mammal, often first manifesting itself through gut or respiratory symptoms. More recognisable symptoms soon become apparent, however, such as hyperactivity and hydrophobia....
Reflected Glory: Map of the Bay of Biscay Coastline (1588)
This is the last of three nautical charts covering the Bay of Biscay coastline that were published in the first part of The Mariners Mirrour, an English translation of a Dutch atlas of sea charts. Depicted here is the stretch from Aviles to Ribadasella...
Social Climber: Having Been Part of the Team That Made the First Successful Ascent of Mount Everest, George Band Joined Joe Brown to Become the First to Reach the Summit of Kangchenjunga. on the 50th Anniversary of That Climb
We reached a rock cliff and Joe decided to take it direct, up a crack with a slight overhang to finish. He turned his oxygen up to six litres a minute and forced his way up. At the top he shouted down, 'George, we're there!' I joined him, with no more...
Stoves: Essential Gear. Napoleon Once Said That an Army Marches on Its Stomach; the Same Could Be Said of Your Average Trekker; This Month, Paul Deegan, Looks at the Cooking Options Available to Hungry Expeditioners
I spent the spring of 1995 on an expedition to Mount Everest. One evening, the stove was proving difficult to light in the tent's porch as freight-train winds roared over our perch on the North Col. We reluctantly dragged the stove inside so that it...
Ten of the Best: You'll Find Everything You Need to Brew Up a Nice Cuppa at the End of a Long Day's Hiking in Our Selection of Some of the Best Stoves and Related Accessories on the Market
1 for liquid fuel MSR Whisperlite Internationale 115 [pounds sterling]/1330 grams Integral 'Shaker Jet' technology makes the best-selling Whisperlite an absolute cinch to clean [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 2 for bottled gas Jetboil PCS...
The Greatest Atlas Ever Produced? Joan Blaeu's Atlas Maior Is One of History's Finest Cartographic Works. to Celebrate the Publication of a New Edition, Christian Amodeo Introduces a Selection of Its Sumptuous Colour Plates
Although map collectors had long been binding loose maps, the world's first atlas wasn't published until 1570. Flemish scholar and geographer Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum orbis terrarum (Theatre of the world) contained 53 maps and was an enormous success....
The National Biodiversity Network (NBN)
When was the NBN founded and how? The idea of a national biodiversity network that which would link sources of UK biodiversity information first arose during the 1980s, leading to the publication of a detailed blueprint in 1995. Five years later,...
The Right to Roam: The 2000 Countryside and Rights of Way Act Has Been Touted as the Most Significant Piece of Rural Legislation since the Second World War. as Huge Tracts of England and Wales Are Finally Opened Up to Walkers, Chris Baker Explains What It Will Mean for Our Countryside
Standing atop Brown Willy, you can taste the sea--a hint of salt drifting in on waterlogged Atlantic air. The ocean breaks against giant cliffs a few kilometres from Cornwall's highest point, while in the other direction you can glimpse the English...
Weather Lore: True or False? Weatherwatch with BBC Weather Forecaster Helen Willetts
What is weather lore? Weather lore is essentially the collection of sayings from the British countryside that were traditionally used days as a weather forecast by those dependant on the land and sea for their living. Surely much of this 'wisdom'...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.