Geographical

The monthly magazine of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers. Covers a broad range of subjects related to geography in articles on people, places, cultures, adventure, responsible travel, history, science, and the envir

Articles from Vol. 80, No. 1, January

Amazon Adventure: A-Level Student Oliver Russell Recounts His Incredible Expedition into the Amazon Rainforest on a Conservation Exercise-His Prize for Winning the 2007 Geographical Young Geographer of the Year Competition
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 'WE WERE WALKING along the transect when we saw paw prints in the mud. When we got to about 200 metres from the end, there was a jaguar, staring right back at us. It was the most intense, incredible experience of the trip'....
A People Divided: The Break-Up of the Former Soviet Union Has Given Armenia's Largest Minority, the Yezidis, New Freedoms. but This Has Proven to Be a Mixed Blessing, as Geopolitical and Historical Concerns Have Riven the Small Community
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Nestled at the foot of Mount Aragats, Armenia's highest peak, the villages of Riya Taza and Alagyaz hardly merit more than a passing glance from motorists heading north towards the border with Georgia. Elderly women dressed...
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Wye Valley: As the Only AONB to Straddle the Border of England and Wales, the Wye Valley's Trustees Strive for Cohesion to Safeguard Its Picturesque Beauty. Christian Amodeo Follows the Wye's Majestic, Meandering Course
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Sheer wooded cliffs and stunning limestone gorges may be indisputable evidence of the Wye River's hard work over millennia--and the reason for its valley's great renown--but today this natural border between England and Wales...
Captain Speke's Artificial Horizon: The Army Officer and Explorer Used This Navigational Aid during His Search for the Source of the River Nile
Born in Devon in 1827, John Hanning Speke was commissioned into the British Indian Army in 1844, going on to travel in the Himalaya. However, he is best known for his subsequent African voyages and discovery of the source of the River Nile. In April...
Growing Pains: With 85 per Cent of the UK's Cut Flowers Being Reported from Overseas, Ready-Made Bunches in Your Local Supermarket Often Come with the Caveats of Carbon Footprints, Pollution and Low Wages for Growers and Workers. Victoria Lambert Explains How the Ethical Consumer Can Buy Carnations with a Clear Conscience
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Not content with being a nation of gardeners, Britain, it seems, is now addicted to the heady quick fix of cut flowers. While the slow and gentle pleasure of sowing seeds and cajoling plants into life still has its fans, many...
Nagorno-Karabakh
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] LOCATED IN THE South Caucasus, Nagorno-Karabakh is a geopolitical oddity. Officially part of the Republic of Azerbaijan, it's actually a de facto independent republic, located close to the border of, and with extremely close...
Row, Row, Row Your Boat: With Ocean Rowing Growing in Popularity, Olly Hicks, the Youngest Person to Row Solo across the Atlantic, Explains What's Needed to Take on the Seven Seas with Your Oars
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] I was only 16 kilometres outside New York harbour when things began to go wrong with my attempt to row west to east across 'The Pond.' On my port side, about eight kilometres distant, Long Island stretched out into the Atlantic...
Saving Mawson's Hut: Almost a Century after Explorer and Geologist Douglas Mawson Established an Extensive Scientific Research Programme at Cape Denison in Antarctica, Another Team of Australians Has Battled Blizzards and the Hostile Polar Environment to Complete the First Stage of a Ten-Year Programme Aimed at Preserving Mawson's Iconic Hut
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The lights are barely visible from the outside, as a 150km/h blizzard batters the Sorensen Hut, an Antarctic summer base at Cape Denison. But the five expeditioners cooped up inside aren't even aware of the howling winds roaring...
Stuck in the Mud
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In May 2006, hot water and mud began gushing through cracks in the dry earth of East Java, Indonesia, apparently triggered by careless gas-drilling through the porous and permeable rock below. Since then, the mud volcano has...
Telling Geography's Stories
While we were putting together this issue of Geographical, a flurry of those 'Oh woe is geography teaching' stories appeared in the national press. As usual, they were reporting the results of a survey into children's geographical knowledge, this time...
Ten of the Best: If You're Spending Months Alone at Sea in a Rowing Boat, You'll Need More Than a Map and Your Thoughts to Keep You Company. Here Are Some State-of-the-Art Items That Will Keep You Warm, Dry and on Course
[1] Survival suit Guy Cotten TPS Suit [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 480 [pounds sterling]/3.5 kilograms This survival suit is easy to put on, not too cumbersome and inherently buoyant. No lifejacket is needed, so the wearer can swim with the suit...
That Sinking Feeling: A Miscalculation by Salt-Mining Engineers 200 Years Ago Almost Sounded a Permanent Death Knell for the Cheshire Market Town of Northwich, but a Remarkable Rescue Plan Has Now Saved It from Subsiding into the Source of Its Own Wealth
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 'Northwich is a dream town, a fanciful creation of a disordered brain. The streets swagger at eccentric angles, and the houses lurch forward drunkenly. I entered the library and experienced sensations usually associated with...
The Call to Arms
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Troops practise cavalry manoeuvres in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1900. Argentina's national army was established at around the same time as the Independent Republic of Argentina was created after dictator General Juan Manuel...
The Low Down on Low Light: As the Days Grow Shorter and the Temperatures Drop, Most of Us Will Be Trying to Stay Warm and Snug Indoors. but the Winter Months Offer Landscape Photographers Ideal Conditions for Getting out and Practising Their Art
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The bleak Northern Hemisphere midwinter may not seem like an ideal time for photography. The further north you live, the fewer the hours of daylight and even then, the skies may be picked with grey cloud set to burst with...
'There Is No Doubt There Is a New Scramble for Africa under Way'
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Former UN secretary general Kofi Annan and humanitarian campaigner Bob Geldof have kicked off what is planned as a series of flagship events for this year--all placed under the umbrella of our new 21st Century Challenges series....
Tim Cope
Tim Cope, 28, is the first person in more than 800 years to ride 10,000 kilometres between Mongolia and Hungary in the footsteps of Genghis Khan. Travelling on horseback across the Eurasian Steppe, Cope was forced to rely on the hospitality and local...
Top 10 Writer's Reads
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Dr Iain Stewart is a geology lecturer and earthquake expert who has presented two Horizon documentaries for the BBC. His latest book, Earth: The Power of the Planet, is out now 1. The Myth of Solid Ground by David Ulin...
Trade: More Than US$6trillion Worth of Merchandise Is Exported Worldwide Each Year
Some countries are so dependent upon exports and imports that the value of their international trade exceeds that of their Gross Domestic Product. And with globalisation, many of the wealthier countries have experienced a major increase in the scale...
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