Geographical

The monthly magazine of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers. Covers a broad range of subjects related to geography in articles on people, places, cultures, adventure, responsible travel, history, science, and the envir

Articles from Vol. 79, No. 2, February

Aboriginal Remains to Be Returned
The Natural History Museum (NHM) is to return the remains of 18 Aboriginal people to Australia in line with new legislation introduced in 2005. After considering advice from its Human Remains Advisory Panel, the museum's board of trustees decided...
Afghanistan Uncovered
Currently showing at the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) headquarters in London, From Kabul to Kandahar: 1833-1933 is an exhibition of photographs, drawings and lithographs illustrating life in Afghanistan during the era of the Great Game, when...
Battling the Banana Plague: In Uganda, the Average Adult Gets through a Kilo of Bananas a Day-Providing as Much as a Quarter of Their Daily Carbohydrate Intake. So When a Virulent Disease Started Working Its Way through the Country's Banana Plantations, the Nation Held Its Breath
Juliet Namuddu's face was a picture of despair. "This last year has been awful," she explained. "My family has been hit very hard since this disease arrived." We were standing in the dappled shade of Namuddu's banana plantation in Mukono district,...
Borderline Decisions: Geo Photo: Cameras Are Often Forbidden at Border Crossings, but Sometimes These Sensitive Sites Invite Photographic Attention
Whenever you join the queue for passport control and security checks at the airport, you're more than likely to spot a sign marked 'No photography'. It's a blunt, uncompromising edict that is enforced in just about every airport in the world. In this...
Explorer's Essentials: Andy Kirkpatrick, Alpinist, Photographer, Writer and Speaker
1. Patagonia Das Parka. A big synthetic duvet with arms that has saved me from a frosty death countless times. * www.patagonia.com 2. Nikon FM3A SLR camera. Digital is great for holiday snaps, but a--50[degrees]C it's just dead technology. Velvia...
Forthcoming Events in February
For details, please contact the Events Office on 020 7591 3100 1 February, 10am INSET day (EDUCATION CONFERENCE, LONDON) Annual teacher in-service training day that includes workshops on current topics, policy updates and exhibitions from...
Henry George 'Gino' Watkins' Wound Plugs: Wooden Pegs Used by the Young Explorer during an Expedition to Greenland, Where He Disappeared While Hunting Seals
Born on 20 January 1907, Gino Watkins was only 25 years old when he died on an expedition to Greenland, but despite his youth, he had already established himself as an explorer of note. Always interested in outdoor pursuits, Watkins had become an...
In the Field
Fieldwork and good empirical or real-life observations are, quite simply, the key elements that make up great research. In recognition of this fact, and in support of geographical research, the Society funds a continuous range of fieldwork projects...
Keeping Up with the Khans: The Karakoram Highway Is Undoubtedly One of the World's Most Terrifying Commutes, Especially If You're Doing It in a Truck So Intensely Decorated That You're Lucky to Be Able See out of the Windscreen. Liz Scarff Braves This Rocky Road to Meet the Drivers and Admire Their Travelling Art Galleries
Northwestern Pakistan is a remote, rebellious region of towering peaks and vertiginous cliffs. It's a hot, dry, barren land that almost seems to dare plants to grow in its monochrome soils. But moving among this mountainous moonscape is a herd of incongruous...
Life among the Clouds
It's believed that Asian settlers first arrived in what is now the Independent State of Papua New Guinea more than 50,000 years ago. The territory has since seen numerous struggles for ownership, including claims from Germany, Holland and the UK, as...
Mendip Hills: Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty: An Area That Has Been Heavily Influenced by Its Lead-Mining Heritage, the 198-Square-Kilometre Mendip Hills AONB Rises above the Somerset Levels South of Bristol, Providing Views of the Severn Estuary, Somerset and Beyond
Just a few strides into a late summer walk from Charterhouse in the heart of the Mendip Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) to Black Down, its highest point, and confusion has already descended. According to my companions, the land we're...
Natalie Hoare in Conversation with ... Sir Ranulph Fiennes
Sir Ranulph Fiennes, 62, the first man to reach both North and South poles by land, is to climb the 3,970-metre Eiger Mountain in the Swiss Alps in March to raise 1.5million [pounds sterling] for the Marie Curie Delivering Choice Programme. Despite...
North Korea
The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) is arguably the world's most secretive country. With a population of 23 million and an area of 120,000 square kilometres, it became a republic in September 1948 after the end of the Second World...
Sanctuary in the Sun: From the outside, Quilalea Island in Northeastern Mozambique Looks like Just Another Playground for the Wealthy-Hosting a Swish Resort Made Up of Nine Beautifully Decked out Bungalows. but Dig a Bit Deeper and You Discover That It Was Also the Germ around Which an Extraordinary Conservation Project Was Built
Seven years. That's how long it's been since I last went scuba diving. Not that I'm worried: let's just all it mild apprehension: seven years is a long time. One final check and then we're underwater ... breathing easily and calmly ... adjust buoyancy....
Sand, Sweat and Tears: Essential Gear: The Marathon De Sables, a 243-Kilometre Foot Race through the Sahara, Isn't for the Faint of Heart. Mark Gillet Survived It and Has Returned with a Selection of Top Kit Tips
My introduction to the infamous six-day desert marathon known as the Marathon de Sables (MdS) was a video recording of the 2004 event, in which adventurer and television presenter Ben Fogle took part. He suffered terribly from blisters and general...
Sea Change: The World's Commercial Fisheries Are in Terminal Decline. and with the Recent Announcement of the Latest EU Fisheries Council Quotas Drawing the Usual Condemnation from Conservationists, a Group of Scientists Is Now Suggesting That It's Time to Revolutionise the Way in Which Our Marine Resources Are Managed
For some time now, the world's oceans and the people who fish them have been a constant source of bad environmental news. Cod is effectively an endangered species now; every year, thousands of dolphins are drowned and fatally injured by Spanish sea-bass...
Songs of Defiance: The Turbulence of Tibet's Last Half-Century Has Had Important Implications for Its Rich Musical Culture. Leading an Oxford University and Royal Geographical Society Expedition, Tom Hamilton Set out to Record and Document the Traditional Folk Music of One Remote Himalayan Community
Every musician knows the feeling of being told to keep quiet. But while for most of us it's something that happens occasionally--when practicing gets too loud or goes on too late, last summer I met a man who was told to keep his music quiet for more...
Ten of the Best: Even If You're Not Planning on Competing in the Marathon De Sables, You're Still Sure to Find Some Great Tips on Kit for Hot, Extreme Expeditions in Our Regular Round-Up of the Best Gear Currently on Offer
1 Sleeping bag PHD Minim 400 195 [pounds sterling]/670 grams This sleeping bag is an absolute delight. It's extremely light and has no zip, so it's failsafe. Most importantly, it packs down to a tiny size. This is the nearest you can get to carrying...
Tree Planting Not a Carbon Cure-All
Attempts to mitigate global climate change by planting trees may be doing more harm than good, according to a recent study. Ecologists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Carnegie Institution and Universite Montpellier II found...
Weil's Disease: Medical Advice from Jason Gibbs, Head Pharmacist at Nomad Travel Stores and Health Clinics
Officially known as leptospirosis, Weil's disease has several colloquial names, including swamp fever, caver's flu, swineherd's disease or sewerman's flu, because of its symptoms and the many ways in which the disease can be caught. Leptospirosis...
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