Geographical

The monthly magazine of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers. Covers a broad range of subjects related to geography in articles on people, places, cultures, adventure, responsible travel, history, science, and the envir

Articles from Vol. 90, No. 10, October

AN IMAGINARY RACISM: Islamophobia and Guilt
AN IMAGINARY RACISM Islamophobia and Guilt by Pascal Bruckner * Polity Books * [pounds sterling]16.99 (hardback) * I felt uncomfortable reading this book on public transport. I'm not sure if that says more about me, the book, or the times...
Atlas of Design: The North American Cartographic Information Society Is a Non-Profit Organisation That Has Been Promoting Map-Making and Data Visualisation for Nearly 40 Years. since 2012, It Has Been Producing Biennial Volumes of Some of the World's Most Beautiful and Intriguing Examples of Cartographic Design
* 'WHO OWNS THE ARCTIC? MULTIPLE CLAIMS' by Xemartin Laborde, Delphine Papin, and Bruno Tertrais Taken from the Atlas of Borders, a cartographic and geopolitical book published in France in 2016. The book describes the contemporary issues of...
Base Behaviour: A Relocated Military Base in Okinawa, Japan Will Cause 'Irreversible' Damage to a Rare Ecosystem, Say Environmental Groups
Protests against a new US air base are taking place in the sea. In recent months, hundreds of 'kayaktivists' have patrolled the coast of Henoko Bay on the island of Okinawa, Japan, the bright colours of the boats at odds with the paddlers' serious...
Beneath Canopy: How a Team of Scientists Is Using Artificial Intelligence to Change the Way Information Is Gathered from the World's Largest Rainforest
The Amazon rainforest is often dubbed the 'lungs of the planet'. A doctor examining the health of this vital organ might first demand its satellite records. Is its canopy intact? Can it take the deep breaths that keep the planet cool and clean? Next,...
Boom and Bust: The Ongoing Recovery of the Planet's Ozone Layer Is Being Significantly Affected by Volcanic Eruptions
Thanks to the 1987 Montreal Protocol that banned the production of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), global efforts to prevent the depletion of the planet's ozone layer have been surprisingly successful. Although a full recovery isn't expected...
DOWN TO EARTH: Politics in the New Climatic Regime
DOWN TO EARTH Politics in the New Climatic Regime by Bruno Latour * Polity Books * [pounds sterling]1299 (hardback) * Originally published in French in 2017, Bruno Latours academic novella is the latest iteration of a broader project (including...
Driftworld: On This Month's Discovering Britain Trail, Laura Cole Heads to Dungeness, a Landscape of Extremes on the South Coast
Locals call it a separate continent. Romney Marsh, a stretch of fin-shaped land that protrudes into the English Channel, looks different to the rest of the country for two main reasons. First, it is flat. The pastures look ironed for miles and are...
Driving Down Numbers: Unchecked Tourism Is Potentially Reducing the Number of Cheetah Cubs That Survive to Adulthood
While protected areas are generally designed to be safe havens, unchecked human pressures can have a negative impact,' says zoologist Femke Broekhuis, lead author of a new study by the University of Oxford that has raised questions about levels of...
ELECTRIC COOL: Formula E Electric Car Racing Is Now a Serious Player on the International Motorsport Calendar. from the Heat of the Santiago Street Race, Matt Maynard Investigates Whether the Championship Is a Sustainable Showcase for Combatting Air Pollution and Climate Change, or Just a Less Noisy Distraction from More Serious Issues
Combustion engines have been banished overnight. The skyscraper lined streets are empty. The soup of everyday smog is clearing as the sun rises over the Andes. Into the new dawn, early-rising spectators pace down the middle of Santiago's triple-lane...
Endangered Alphabets: Tim Brookes Is the Founder of the Endangered Alphabets Project (Geog.gr/eap) a Non-Profit Organisation That Preserves Endangered Cultures
By the most widely-quoted estimate, the world has between 6,000 and 7,000 languages, as many as half of which will be extinct by the end of this century. An even more dramatic sign of the rate at which the world's cultural diversity is shrinking involves...
Equipment Selections
CLOTHING Walking boots Walking the New Forest means being prepared for a variety of surfaces from well-trodden paths to boggy wet heaths, so a pair of stout, durable and waterproof walking boots are a must. The Keen Liberty Ridge hiking boot...
Expedition Kit
Wetsuit Stingray stinger suit .[pounds sterling]54.99 Depending on the time of year, the waters of Raja Ampat do contain jellyfish. Stingray is the original sun protection company in Australia and specialises in UV protective swimwear and...
Explore 2018
In our fast-paced and interconnected world, is there still a place for scientific expeditions and journeys with a purpose? Does field research still offer valuable, timely contributions that increase our knowledge and understanding? At the Royal Geographical...
FEARGHAL O'NUALLAIN: Fearghal O'Nuallain Is a Geography Teacher and Explorer. His Edited Book, the Kindness of Strangers, Is on Sale Now, with All Proceeds Going to the Oxfam Syrian Refugee Appeal
I'm a geography teacher that goes places. I'm trying to bring the field into the classroom, and to engage a wider audience with geographical issues through adventurous story telling. What appeals to me most about geography is the fact that it embraces...
Fit for the Kings: In the Indonesian Archipelago of Raja Ampat, New Measures to Protect Marine Biodiversity Are Now Bearing Fruit. Daniel Allen Takes to the Area's Teeming Waters to See What Effect Such Measures Are Having
From the sun-drenched deck of Euphoria, Equator Island is a long line of soaring limestone sugarloafs. Their bases undercut by the limpid waters of the Indo-Pacific Ocean, a series of cliffs rise up sheer and high, pockmarked with caves and topped...
Golden Roasts: The 'Golden Triangle' Switches from Growing Opium Crops to Coffee
The infamous 'golden triangle', once the capital of Southeast Asia's illegal opium trade, is in the middle of a transition. Hundreds of farmers in Myanmar and Laos are, with the help of the UN, switching from growing opium to growing coffee beans....
Health Check: Marco Magrini Finds That a Warming World Also Means a More Unhealthy One, Not Just for the Planet Itself, but for Those of Us Living on It
What's bad for the planet is usually bad for human health. In other words, the current warming trends don't spell good news for the well-being of our species... or tor many others. There are exceptions. Insects will thrive as the warmer temperatures...
Himalayan Gold: In the Highest Himalayan Pastures, Caterpillars Infected with a Rare Fungus Protrude from the Ground. Prized for Their Curative Powers and Fetching a Price Higher Than Gold, Yarsagumba Has Changed the Lives of Those Who Gather Them
All men are useless. The men from the villages are useless. The men from Kathmandu are useless. I'm much better off without one.' Shaking her head as if exasperated by her words, Rhita unscrews the cap of a tartan-patterned thermos flask, pours out...
IDENTITY: Contemporary Identity Politics and the Struggle for Recognition
IDENTITY Contemporary Identity Politics and the Struggle for Recognition by Francis Fukuyama * Profile Books * [pounds sterling]16.99 (hardback) * [pounds sterling]1499 (eBook) * Many Western intellectuals look back to the classical...
Industrial Espionage: Klaus Dodds Is a Professor of Geopolitics at Royal Holloway, University of London and Author of Geopolitics: A Very Short Introduction
For some retired spies in the United States, a new career working in the corporate world awaits where their field intelligence skills can be put to work. Former CIA employees have discovered that they don't have to stop being spies as domestic US companies...
Nature's Heartbeat
Oceanic and terrestrial ecosustems are highly productive. This can be demonstrated by their gross primary productivity (GPP) - the rate at which organic material is built through the process of photosynthesis. Measured according to the amount of carbon...
Rockin' All over the World: Major Earthquakes Are Triggering Seismic Activity Half the World Away
It is well known that major earthquakes are often followed by aftershocks, sometimes powerful ones. But it is generally understood that these shocks will occur in roughly the same region of the world as the initial quake. New research reveals a...
Royal Geographical Society (with Ibg): Selection of Events for October
10 October, 6.30pm Clerical domesticity and the inner city: vicarages and urban change in Britain 1960-1990 (Lecture, Hammersmith) Professor Alastair Owens considers the changing role of Anglican vicarages in inner cities in order to understand...
TASTING THE PAST: The Science of Flavor & the Search for the Origins of Wine
TASTING THE PAST The Science of Flavor & the Search for the Origins of Wine by Kevin Begos * Algonquin Books * [pounds sterling]20.99 (hardback) * About 8,000 years ago, somewhere in the Caucasus Mountains, humans began turning grapes...
The Cost of Living
If you're looking for evidence to back up the assertion that humans are depleting the planet's resources you are spoilt for choice, but the WWF Living Planet report is a good place to start. The report calculated that we need 1.5 Earths to regenerate...
The Enchanted Forest: Of Britain's 15 National Parks, the New Forest Is Probably the One Most Synonymous with Images of Autumn. Home to Some of the Country's Most Extensive Areas of Broadleaf Deciduous Trees, as Well as Open Heathland, Wild Ponies and Five Species of Deer, This Rural Retreat Is a Favourite Haunt of Photographers, Says Keith Wilson
Covering an area of 570 square kilometres, the New Forest is the country's second smallest national park, but with more than 15 million annual visitors, it is one of the most popular, no doubt due to its proximity to Greater London - less than two...
THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS: Travel Stories That Make Your Heart Grow
THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS: Travel Stories That Make Your Heart Grow edited by Fearghal O'Nuallain * Summersdale * [pounds sterling]9.99 (paperback) * The generosity of people who selflessly aid foreign travellers (often then refusing payment)...
The Untamed Salween River: Max and Bertha Ferrars, 1890-1899
During their exploration of Myanmar in the late 1890s, anthropologists Max and Bertha Ferrars documented the geophysical features of the landscapes, as well as the various local populations they encountered along the 2,400km Salween river. Originating...
UKRAINE: A Nation on the Borderland
UKRAINE A Nation on the Borderland by Karl Schlogel (translated by Gerrit Jackson) * Reaktion Books * [pounds sterling]18 (hardback) * Ukraine, one of Europe's largest and most populous countries, rich in both history and geography,...
Writer's Reads
Oliver Bullough is the author of Moneyland (reviewed next month). * Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by JK Rowling (1998) This perfectly explains the danger of shell companies thanks to Mr Weasley, who scolds his daughter: 'Never trust...
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