History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 1, January

Alien Abductions
Michael Sturma finds parallels in contemporary accounts of abductions by space aliens with European narratives of captivity by Indians and Aboriginals in early America and Australia. IN 1976 FOUR STUDENTS WENT ON A CAMPING trip in a wilderness area...
Birth of Sir Edwin Chadwick
January 24th, 1800 EDWIN CHADWICK WAS a civil servant, not a Member of Parliament, but he may have had more influence on more people's lives for good and for ill than all Britain's Victorian parliamentarians put together. Described by his friend...
Blood and Roses
Gordon Marsden describes how his early interest in history bewildered his family but proved ineradicable. I DIDN'T READ 1066 And All That until well into my teens, but if I had done so earlier, I would have been a sucker for it. Kings, Queens, battles...
Britain Ad 1
David Braund looks at the physical, institutional and social environment of Britain at the time of the Roman invasions and shows how archaeology and the written word illuminates an obscure age. AT THE BEGINNING OF THE FIRST millennium AD there was...
Eric Foner
Daniel Snowman talks to a man who has devoted his long and distinguished career to unravelling the threads of American freedom. ERIC FONER was Harmsworth Professor of American History at Oxford a few years ago, when he was invited to take tea with...
Exhibiting the Nation
In the Royal Historical Society Gresham lecture, delivered in November 1999, Asa Briggs looks at the continuities and contrasts between 1851, 1951 and 2000. IT IS A PRIVILEGE to be delivering this lecture on the eve of a wide range of millennial...
Fighters for the Poor
Susan Cohen and Clive Fleay rediscover the forgotten lives and work of three women who sought to alleviate the plight of Britain's Edwardian underclass. THE UPSURGE OF SOCIAL INQUIRY INTO THE NATURE and extent of poverty in Britain from the later...
First Performance of Puccini's Tosca
January 14th, 1900 AS EARLY AS MAY 1889 Puccini told his publisher, Giulio Ricordi, that he wanted to make an opera out of a melodrama which the highly regarded French playwright Victorien Sardou had written as a sensational acting vehicle for Sarah...
Georgian Town Gardens
Greening urban landscapes is nothing new, says Joyce Ellis, the Georgians were Greens too. THE PROCESS OF URBAN DEVELOPMENT in Georgian England produced a landscape dominated by bricks and mortar as the built-up area of towns across the country...
Hundreds and Thousands
WITH ALL THE TALK OF A NEW MILLENNIUM, we seem to have lost sight of something rather more important, or at least more meaningful: the dawning of the new century. Millennia are unwieldy beasts, too vast to sum up with a pithy phrase and beyond the...
La Dolce Vita
Stephen Gundle settles in the stalls to re-view the epochal Fellini film that defined the hedonistic spirit of post-war Italy. ALTHOUGH IT WAS MADE FORTY YEARS ago, La Dolce Vita remains a very contemporary film. Directed by Federico Fellini...
Longitude: The Hidden Evidence
THE STORY OF THE YORKSHIRE CARPENTER John Harrison has been made famous by Dava Sobel's bestselling book Longitude, but it has never been clear why, after building a sea-clock that appeared to work well, Harrison refused to compete for the Longitude...
President Truman Orders the Development of the Hydrogen Bomb
January 31st, 1950 In September 1949 the American, British and Canadian governments announced that an atomic explosion had recently occurred in the Soviet Union. The Soviet news agency Tass responded, laughably blaming the blast on large-scale construction...
Round and About: January
London 1900: Art at the Crossroads January 16th - April 3rd 1999 Royal Academy of Arts Piccadilly, London W1V 0DS Tel: 020 8300 8000 Inspired by the World's Fair of 1900 in Paris, this exhibition draws on the masters who were featured in...
The Zulus and the Boer War
Jabulani Maphalala recalls the calamatious effects of a white man's war on the Zulu people caught between them. THE ANGLO-BOER WAR is often described as `a domestic quarrel of the white people', as the two independent Boer republics (the South African...
Why Hess Flew: A New View
SIGNIFICANT NEW EVIDENCE has arisen which supports the viewpoint that Rudolf Hess, Hitler's deputy, was flying to a pre-arranged meeting in lowland Scotland in May 1941, rather than the more usual explanation that he was acting alone in a forlorn peace...
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