History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 2, February

A Heavenly Visitation: Larry Gragg Recounts the Reasons for the Visit of the Quaker George Fox to Barbados in 1671, and the Significance of His Presence There
WHEN THOMAS FOSTER manoeuvred his ketch, the Industry, into Carlisle Bay, Barbados on October 3rd, 1671, among his passengers was a singular figure. For two decades George Fox (1624-91) had been the moving force in the development of the Society of...
Art & Industry Coalbrookdale Co and the Great Exhibition: David Hopkins Looks at the 19th-Century Drive to Improve the Quality of British Design and Manufacture, and Its Impact on the Ironbridge District
The early nineteenth century had brought about great changes in the production and consumption of art. In dividing labour, separating design from manufacture and introducing machine production, manufacturers had ushered in an age of imitation and cheap...
Ashes to Ashes: On the 60th Anniversary of the Fall of Singapore, Arguably the Nadir of Anglo-Australian Relations, Richard Wilkinson Explores the Strange Relationship between the Two Countries in the Last Century
In 1992 Australia's prime minister Paul Keating accused Britain of betraying Australia during the Second World War by sacrificing the so-called Far East to concentrate on Europe. A few months later the British government released documents suggesting...
Barbados: British Empire in Miniature
Barbados is like no other West Indian island. Its coral origins give it golden beaches and rolling, easily cultivated landscape, where the sugar wealth of the past was created. It has no towering volcanic peaks, no mouldering ruins, no destruction...
Birth of Charles Lindbergh February 4th, 1902. (Months Past)
THE AMERICAN PILOT who soared to worldwide fame when he made the first non-stop flight across the Atlantic in 1927 was born Charles Augustus Lindbergh in Detroit. The Lindbergh family, originally Swedish, produced a succession of rugged individualists....
Birth of Victor Hugo February 26th, 1802. (Months Past)
POSSIBLY THE MOST famous French author of all time was appropriately conceived on an exceptionally high plane -- `almost in mid-air', his father later maintained, on `one of the highest peaks of the Vosges Mountains'. As a hoax a stone memorial was...
Carnuntum. (Frontline)
SCIENTISTS USING GROUND RADAR and computers have accomplished what archaeologists using spades could not, uncovering the heart of one of Austria's most important digs -- a first-century Roman military camp on the Danube River. According to Wolfgang...
Churchill's Faithful Chela: Charles Lysaght Strips Away Some of the Many Mysteries Surrounding Brendan Bracken, Churchill's Staunch but Enigmatic Supporter and the Founder of This Magazine. (Cross Current)
THE MEMORY OF Brendan Bracken, the centenary of whose birth occurred in February 2001, is inextricably linked with that of Sir Winston Churchill. `He has sometimes been almost my sole supporter in the years when I have been striving to get this country...
Historians Rewarded
THE BRITISH ACADEMY, the national academy for the Humanities and Social Sciences, which is celebrating its centenary this year, awarded its first book prize in December 2001 for books which celebrate the best of accessible scholarly writing in the...
History's League Tables. (Frontline)
THE OFFICIAL `LEAGUE TABLES' of British university departments, based on the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), whereby the quantity and quality of the research output of each department is assessed, were published in December 2001. The history departments...
Holocaust Memorial Day in Britain: David Cesarani Reflects on the Past, Present and Future of Education about Genocide and Bigotry
ON NOVEMBER 11TH, 2001, I took my family to the Field of Remembrance in the grounds of Westminster Abbey, where row upon row of diminutive crosses are planted in memory of the fallen. I have been making this trip for a number of years, sometimes with...
Nation-Building in 19th-Century Italy: The Case of Francesco Crispi
THE RE-EMERGENCE of nationalism as a powerful and virulent factor in international relations -- in the Balkans, the former Soviet empire, and elsewhere -- together with the increasing momentum in Europe towards ever-greater political integration, has...
Postgraduate History
WHY DO A MASTER'S COURSE in historical studies? There are several good reasons, but primarily, these courses provide an opportunity to consolidate and flesh out existing knowledge and interests resulting from undergraduate studies. They may be undertaken...
Pots of Silver? Michael Vickers Considers the Original Value of Greek Ceramics, and Why It Has Become Inflated in Recent Centuries
THE WAY IN WHICH WE REGARD Greek and Roman artefacts -- especially pottery -- today, is different from the way in which they were regarded in antiquity. Until recently, some Greek pottery vessels were ranked among the most precious surviving relics,...
Round and About: February 2002. (Frontline)
London British History Unit Seminars February 4th, 18th. 5.30pm London School of Economics Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE Tel: 020 7955 7073 Janet Hunter (LSE) talks on `Britain and the Japanese Economy in the First World War' on the 4th,...
Sir John Plumb: David Cannadine Recalls the Career and Personality of an Inspirational Historian
SIR JOHN (J.H.) PLUMB, who died aged 90 in October 2001, had been in ill health for some time -- and in rude health for a great deal longer. The many obituaries stressed his equivocal relationship with Cambridge University, his long connection with...
The Funeral of King George VI February 15th, 1952. (Months Past)
ON JANUARY 31ST, looking tired and frail four months after an operation for lung cancer, the King waved goodbye to Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh at London Airport as they set off to East Africa. His doctors had kept the truth of his...
The Women's Library. (Frontline)
ON FEBRUARY 4TH, THE WOMEN'S LIBRARY opens in an extraordinary new building in Aldgate East. Designed by Wright and Wright, it retains the facade of the old wash houses formerly occupying the site, a place where women gathered and worked. Behind, a...
Warship Weeks. (Frontline)
DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR the Royal Navy lost 254 major warships due to enemy action, in addition to 1,035 minor war vessels and auxiliaries. To counter these losses a huge ship-building programme was organised. However, ships are expensive to build,...

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