History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 11, November

A.G. Dickens and His Reformation. (Frontline)
GEOFF DICKENS WAS one of the dominating historians of Tudor England, from the 1960s until the 1980s. Dickens, G.R. Elton and J.E. Neale set the agenda and seemed to be giving most of the answers. Like Elton and Neale, Dickens wrote stylishly, had big...
An Economy Geared to War: Richard Overy Argues That the Lesson Hitler Drew from 1914-18 Was Not That a Major War Should Be Avoided, but That Germany Should Prepare More Systematically So That, Next Time, She Would Win
IN JUNE 1937 the American military attache in Berlin wrote back to Washington: `The entire economic life of the German nation is being organised on a war economy basis'. The character of German preparations was, in his view, determined by the idea...
Catherine the Great: A Personal View
Isabel de Madariaga looks at the personality and achievement of the controversial Empress of Russia. SINCE I FIRST TOOK Catherine seriously as a ruler, some forty years ago, I have grown to like her very much. This is not therefore going to be an...
City Status in the United Kingdom: John Beckett Investigates the Thorny, and Sometimes Illogical, Issue of What Makes a City. (Cross Current)
AFTER A TWO-YEAR competition involving dozens of would-be `cities', the government announced in December 2000 that Brighton and Hove, Wolverhampton and Inverness would become cities as part of the Millennium celebrations. Few people outside the Home...
Death of Kate Greenaway: November 6th, 1901. (Months Past)
THE UNCROWNED queen of the golden age of children's book illustration was fifty-four when she died at her house in Hampstead. Designed for her by Richard Norman Shaw, the house was a tangible proof of success, for she had started life in modest circumstances...
Deep Time and Australian History: Tom Griffiths Continues Our Series on History and the Environment, Travelling into the Longue Duree of the Australian Past
`IT IS EASY TO FORGET', writes archaeologist Donald Grayson, `that the antiquity of people on earth had to be discovered.' Yet that discovery took place only a little more than a century ago. Geologists uncovered and stared into the `dark abyss of...
Edmund Gosse and the Victorian Nude: Jason Edwards Takes a Fresh Look at Attitudes to the Nude in Victorian Art, to Coincide with Tate Britain's Major Exhibition on the Subject Opening This Month. (Cover Story)
IN HIS 1907 MEMOIR, Father and Son, the influential art critic and litterateur Edmund Gosse (1849-1928) recalled his Victorian childhood in Marychurch, Devonshire, during the 1850s and 1860s among the Plymouth Brethren. Although Gosse recognised that...
Elizabeth I's `Golden' Speech: November 30th, 1601. (Months Past)
QUEEN ELIZABETH I was the greatest master of public relations ever to occupy the English throne. Highly intelligent, maddening and enchanting, she staged a brilliantly successful one-woman show in which, spectacularly costumed and blazingly bejewelled,...
Handel's Houses. (Frontline)
ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS people tell you in Halle, a small Saxon town in eastern Germany two hours south of Berlin, is that, in the decade since German reunification, many of its brighter young citizens have left to seek fame (or at least fortune) elsewhere....
Hitler, Rohm and the Night of the Long Knives
German historian Lothar Machtan argues that Hitler's active homosexuality can be seen in his long string of close friendships with notorious members of the homosexual worlds of Vienna and Munich from the 1900s, through his years in the trenches in...
Images beyond History: Photographs of the Western Front: In the Second Article in the Picturing History Series, Sander L. Gilman Reflects on Images of the First World War and the Photographs of Alan Cohen. (Cover Story)
In the second article in the Picturing History series, Sander L. Gilman reflects on images of the First World War and the photographs of Alan Cohen. THIS AUTUMN THE BBC IS PLANNING to provide viewers with a cross between Survivors and The 1900 House....
Joachim Von Ribbentrop `the Most Brainless Boy' in Hitler's Class? Richard Wilkinson Considers the Character and Standing of the Much-Despised Nazi Foreign Minister
WHO GOT THE BIGGEST LAUGH at the Nuremberg Trial? The answer is, von Ribbentrop. It happened when he was denying that he had bullied President Hacha of Czechoslovakia. `What further pressure could you put on the head of a country except to threaten...
Lebensraum: Policy or Rhetoric? Martyn Housden Tries to Unravel What Hitler Really Meant When He Talked about Living Space for the German People
When the Germans talked of Lebensraum, or `living space', they used the term to denote a perceived need to have enough physical room to provide for themselves comfortably. In particular, it identified the possession of enough land to feed a population...
Proper History and Sixth-Form History: Martin Roberts Regrets Lost Opportunities in the Recent Reform of A-Level Syllabuses. (Today's History)
THE GOVERNMENT'S recent `No-one forgets a good teacher' campaign has had celebrities reminiscing about their best teacher. More often than not that teacher had taught them in the sixth-form. This is not surprising. Sixth-formers are intelligent people...
Round and About: November
London The Power and the Glory? The 19th-century Monarchy Reconsidered oct 24th, 31st; Nov 5th, 13th, 21st, 27th, at 6.30 pm Art Workers' Guild Queen Square, London WC1. Details on 020 8994 1019 The Victorian Society's autumn lecture series...
Spanish Civil War. (Frontline)
THE LAST TIME THAT ANYONE did a serious count, there were over 15,000 books published about the Spanish Civil War. That was in 1968 and the counting was done by a team from Franco's Ministry of Information. The scale of the literature then was partly...
St Francis Xavier Departs from Japan: November 21st, 1551. (Months Past)
THE EARLIEST Westerners to discover Japan seem to have been adventurous Portuguese traders who came across it by accident in the 1540s. They were soon followed by the first Christian missionary to the country, Francis Xavier, the Apostle of the East....
The Ministry and the Malady: Paul Brassley Puts MAFF's Policy towards Foot and Mouth Disease into Historical Perspective. (Cross Current)
WHO WAS THE LAST minister in the Cabinet? It is bound to be a quiz question sooner or later, and the answer will be Nick Brown. The explanation, of course, is that heads of government departments serving in the cabinet are usually secretaries of state,...
Through the Looking Glass: David Hockney Explains How a Question about Some Ingres Drawings Led to a Whole New Theory of Western Art. (Point of Departure)
EARLY IN 1999, I went to an exhibition of portraits by Ingres at London's National Gallery, and was captivated by his very beautiful portrait drawings. I was struck by how small his drawings were, yet so uncannily accurate. What made Ingres's achievement...
Unknown Amazon. (Frontline)
THE AMAZONIAN RAINFOREST is one of the most significant and largely intact ecosystems left on earth. It is often characterised as an essentially untouched natural environment in which man's presence is merely incidental. However, the vast reaches of...
What Happened Then. (Frontline)
AFTER WE ALL HAD WATCHED endless ghastly replays of the World Trade Center crashing to the ground and listened to the chaotic, breaking news of September 11th until the wave of unimaginable horrors had passed, one urgent task was to find language with...
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