History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 5, May

Ancient History and Archaelogy
Return to Chauvet Cave: Excavating the Birthface of Art by Jean Clottes (Thames & Hudson, 45 [pounds sterling]) is the first full-length report on the remarkable palaeolithic cave paintings and other findings in the Chauvet cave of southern France,...
Death of David I of Scots: May 24th, 1153. (Months Past)
THE PRINCIPAL architect of the medieval kingdom of Scotland has been described as dragging his backward country by the scruff of its neck into mainstream Europe. David I was the sixth and youngest son of Malcolm III Canmore (Big Head) and his strong-minded...
Death of Samuel Pepys: May 26th, 1703. (Months Past)
WHEN HE DIED, Samuel Pepys's claim to fame was not his diary, which would not be deciphered for another hundred years and more. It was, in the felicitous words of Oxford University's orator, that in his years at the Navy Office he had `encompassed...
Elizabeth I: Gender, Power & Politics: Susan Doran Looks at What It Meant to Be a Female Monarch in a Male World and How the Queen Responded to the Challenges
JUDGING FROM THE RESULTS of last year's BBC television poll of Great Britons, Elizabeth I is the best known and most admired English monarch, at least among those members of the public who decided to vote. Given her high profile in films and biographies,...
Elizabeth's Life and Times
1520 Birth of William Cecil. 1527 Henry VIII tries to have his marriage to Katherine of Aragon annulled. 1533 Henry's secret marriage to Anne Boleyn (Jan). Annulment of Aragon marriage (May). Birth of Elizabeth at Greenwich Palace (Sept 7th)....
Exhibiting Elizabeth: Co-Curator Sian Flynn Introduces Elizabeth: The Exhibition Commemorating the 400th Anniversary of the Queen's Death at the National Maritime Museum, Sponsored by Morgan Stanley, from May 1st to September 14th, 2003
ELIZABETH I WAS BORN in Greenwich Palace on September 7th, 1533. Although no longer standing, the brick riverside palace was a favourite of the Tudors and it became Elizabeth's most favourite out-of-town Residence when she was Queen. Greenwich is...
Exhibiting the Lindisfarne Gospels: Michelle Brown, Curator of Illuminated Manuscripts at the British Library, Discusses New Interpretations of This Treasure, and How This Month Visitors to the Library Will Be Able to Get Closer to It Than Ever before. (Frontline)
THE LINDISFARNE GOSPELS give an invaluable insight into one of the formative periods of world history, when the implications of the demise of the Roman Empire were becoming increasingly apparent as successor states vied with one another for prominence....
Foundation of St Petersburg: May 27th, 1703. (Months Past)
IT WAS NO PLACE to build a city, among the islands and mosquito-ridden marshes where the River Neva debouches into the Gulf of Finland. Damp, windy and prone to floods, St Petersburg has a long winter and the Neva can freeze from November to April,...
Homage to the Horse: This Spring Lexington, Kentucky, Home of American Horseracing, Is Staging a Unique Exhibition of Some of Britain's Most Prized Equine Artefacts. (Frontline)
WITHOUT THE ACCOMPANIMENT OF HORSES, England's nation-building conquests would never have been. Without the contributions of that country's rich horse heritage, we would be deprived of realising just how critical--and intimate--the relationship is...
New in Paperback: We Review a Selection of Books Newly Available in Paperback
From the embarrassment of riches on the shelves of any good bookshop, one's eye is often first caught by an attractive cover. This is certainly so with Curiosity by Barbara M. Benedict (University of Chicago Press, 17.50 [pounds sterling]), which proudly...
Now and Then. (Frontline)
REVOLUTION OR RESTORATION? The hoary old question beloved of examiners could be applied to the present issue of this magazine, which sees us break with the practice of recent years and focus on just a single topic for all our feature articles. The...
Protecting the Rump: We Continue Our Series of Pen-Portraits of Less-Well-Known Parliamentarians with a Sketch of Richard Salwey, Member of the Long Parliament and Commissioner for the Navy. (Common Sense)
IN APRIL 1653 the Rump Parliament was dramatically dissolved by Oliver Cromwell; by the end of the year, it had been replaced by Cromwell's Protectorate. The career of Richard Salwey (1615-85), MP for Appleby, illustrates the making and breaking of...
Queen Elizabeth's Public Face: Tarnya Cooper Looks at the Wider Iconography of Elizabeth, and How This Evolved during Her Reign
IN 1603, WHEN ELIZABETH I was on her death bed, a young law student named John Manningham was staying near the court at Richmond. His diary of that year chronicling the Queen's illness and final death on March 24th, includes a remarkable statement...
Rothschild On-Line: Victor Gray, Director of the Rothschild Archive, Introduces a New Website That Will Prove a Invaluable Resource for All Students of Economic, and Social History, and More Besides. (Frontline)
ROTHSCHILD is ONE OF THOSE names that echoes through many chambers of history. As the world's leading bankers in the nineteenth century their history is intertwined with that of most European countries and many further afield. As some of the most ambitious...
Starkey's Elizabeth: David Starkey Introduces Our Special Issue, and the Greenwich Exhibition
ELIZABETH IS EXTRAORDINARY. She looks extraordinary. She behaves in an extraordinary way. And, as a woman moving so effortlessly in a man's world, she is doubly extraordinary. But we often think of her as being extraordinary for the wrong reasons....
The 18th Century
The Selborne Pioneer. Gilbert White as Naturalist and Scientist, a Re-Examination by Ted Dadswell (Ashgate, 50 [pounds sterling]) presents a reassessment of the innovative 18th-century naturalist. Nobody's Perfect A New Whig Interpretation of History...
The 19th Century
The Trial: The Assassination of President Lincoln and the Trial of the Conspirators edited by Edward Steers, Jr (University Press of Kentucky, 41.95 [pounds sterling]) is a complete transcription and commentary of the 50-day trial of the suspected...
The Allure of Anne: Alison Weir, Best-Selling Historian of the Medieval and Sixteenth-Century Royal Families, Explains How She First Encountered the Power of History in a Strange Feeling of Identification with Anne Boleyn. (Point of Departure)
WHEN I WAS about seven, my father took me on a tour of the Palace of Westminster. I have only the vaguest memories of most of it, but one thing remains clearly in my mind. In the Painted Chamber, I was told to look up at Richard Burchett's Victorian...
The Americas
An extensive annotated bibliography of works, American Foreign Relations Since 1600: A Guide to the Literature edited by Robert L. Beisner & Hurt Hanson (ABC-CLIO, 175 [pounds sterling]) covers 400 years of international relations. At the Edge...
The Coronation of Queen Elizabeth: On January 16th, 1559, England's Twenty-Five-Year-Old Sovereign Left Whitehall to Be Crowned Queen. This Article, by A.L. Rowse, Was First Published in May 1953, Exactly Fifty Years Ago, in a Special Issue of History Today That Marked the Imminent Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II
THE CORONATION OF THE FIRST Elizabeth is of considerable interest to us and of greater historical importance than most. Not only was it the last occasion on which the Latin service was used, as throughout Plantagenet times, and with the Roman mass,...
The Early 20th Century
Like Sex With Gods: An Unorthodox History of Flying by Bayla Singer (Texas A&M University Press, 22.95 [pounds sterling]) approaches the human fascination with flying by considering culture, technology, fantasies and dreams. Coinciding with...
The Last Decade: An Ageing Regime: Paul E.J. Hammer Looks at Elizabeth I and Her Government in the 1590s
WHEN THE SPANISH ambassador to England reported to his master in December 1558 about Queen Elizabeth and her newly established government, he lamented that `the kingdom is entirely in the hands of young folks, heretics and traitors'. By the 1590s,...
The Royal Court and Progresses: Alison Sim Discusses the Practicalities of Running Elizabeth's Court
FOUR HUNDRED years after Elizabeth's death the glamour of her court continues to excite the imagination. The court was, in effect, a magnificent piece of theatre, and as in any theatre a large team of highly trained people was needed to produce the...
The Succession and Foreign Policy: Simon Adams Looks at the Close Connections between Elizabeth's Ascendancy, Her Religion and Her Ensuing Relationships with the States of Europe
`She is a very prudent and accomplished princess, who has been well educated, she plays all sorts of instruments and speaks several languages (even Latin) extremely well. Good-natured and quick spirited, she is a woman who loves justice greatly and...
Topics That Change History: These Days Every Other History Book Seems to Be Called `the Person/journey/discovery/product That Changed the World'. How New Are They? How Much Do These Books Really Tell Us? Peter Clifford Tried to Find Out
HISTORY IS CONSTRUCTED out of a myriad of often apparently insignificant, personal actions, fragmentary episodes, small details and chance discoveries. More often than not, they have unforeseen consequences and it is only when their implications ricochet...
Torture at the Tower. (Frontline)
FROM MAY 1ST, THE TOWER OF LONDON is opening a new permanent installation entitled `Torture at the Tower'. This is the first phase of a general programme to re-interpret the subject of imprisonment in the Tower. The aim is for the whole range of imprisonment--from...