History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 12, December

Birth of Joseph Needham
December 9th, 1900 Joseph Needham was one of the twentieth century's most remarkable scholars, a biochemist and authority on the history of science, in particular in China, whose colossal Science and Civilisation in China was published by Cambridge...
Britain 1900
Asa Briggs completes our series by Focusing on the islands one hundred years ago. THERE WAS CONSIDERABLE DOUBT on January 1st, 1900, as to whether the country was beginning a new century or whether there was still another year to go. More time-conscious...
Charlemagne's Elephant
On the 1,200th anniversary of Charlemagne's coronation in Rome, Richard Hodges reviews the evidence for long-distance trade in his empire. RELATIONS BETWEEN THE Mediterranean and northern Europe in the age of Charlemagne have puzzled archaeologists...
Curtains No Longer
BRITAIN'S THEATRES ARE RATHER LIKE WHALES -- an endangered species, but with a vigorous conservation movement working to save them. They are probably under less threat now than twenty years ago, says John Earl, co-editor of The Theatre Trust's Guide...
Death of Lord Armstrong
December 27th, 1900 A brilliant inventor and engineer, William George Armstrong was also an armaments magnate, a considerate and generous man who manufactured killing machinery in large quantitities. Born in 1810, the son of a Newcastle businessman,...
Death of the Emperor Frederick II
December 13th, 1250 The most gifted, vivid and extraordinary of the medieval Holy Roman Emperors was ill for some months before his death. Early in December 1250 a fierce attack of dysentery confined him to his hunting lodge of Castel Fiorentino...
Echoes of Injustice
AT 9.15 AM on Friday, October 21st, 1966, a coal tip slid down a mountainside into the mining village of Aberfan in the South Wales valleys. The slide engulfed a farm, around twenty houses and part of the local junior school before coming to rest....
History in the Media
News The saga of the Enigma cipher machine, stolen from Bletchley Park in April, has taken a bizarre twist this autumn. Letters were sent to Bletchley Park Trust, demanding a ransom for the machine's return and threatening its destruction if terms...
Jack Simmons
JACK SIMMONS, WHO DIED peacefully in September aged eighty-five, was a leading historian of British railways, for which he was belatedly honoured with the OBE in 1999. His railway publications capture the railways' historical importance, showing how...
Letters
Courting Disaster I was sorry that John Miller (`Britain 1600', September) did not mention the Earl of Hertford's rampages through southern Scotland in 1544 and '45. Known as `Henry's Rough Wooing' they were designed to pursuade the Scots to marry...
Marrying for Love the Experience of Edward IV and Henry VIII
Eric Ives looks at the cases of these two English monarchs who broke with convention by selecting spouses for reasons of the heart, rather than political convenience. SHOULD THE MONARCH OR HEIR to throne marry for love? `Of course' is the answer...
Napoleon Iii, Lord Palmerston and the Entente Cordiale
Roman Golicz explores relations between Britain and France under the direction of Pam's `liberal' foreign policy during' the Second Empire. IN JULY 1830, THE `bourgeois revolution' in France ousted Charles X and the Second Bourbon Restoration, and...
Pearl Harbor the First Energy War
Charles Maechling sees the US oil embargo against Japan as the direct origin of the decision to attack the United States in December 1941. DECEMBER 7TH, 1941 -- in the words of President Franklin Roosevelt's stirring war message to Congress, `......
Rescue on the Euphrates
AFTER APPEARING ON THE FRONT PAGE of the New York Times (`Dam in Turkey May Soon Flood A "2nd Pompeii"' on May 7th this year), as well as numerous other national newspapers, the Euphrates bridge-town of Zeugma, virtually unknown a few months ago, has...
Roman Holidays
Simon Thurley, Director of the Museum of London, describes the discovery at the bottom of his garden that changed his life. I DON'T KNOW WHETHER ALL schoolchildren go through a `Roman' stage or whether it is only the ones I meet. Certainly the Romans...
Round and About: December 2000
London Christmas Past November 28th to January 5th Geffrye Museum Kingsland Road London E2 8EA Tel: 020 7739 9893 With the emphasis on tradition, the Geffrye Museum celebrates 400 years of seasonal customs in English homes, decorating each...
The Mysteries of Oscar Wilde
On the centenary of Oscar Wilde's death, Trevor Fisher takes a fresh look at the reasons for the writer's downfall. A CENTURY AFTER HE DIED, Oscar Wilde has reached unprecendented heights of popularity. Recently commemorated with a window in Westminster...
`Whiteness in Crisis'
Alastair Bonnett identifies the ingredients that produced an `identity crisis' for white people in the early twentieth century. INTERRUPTING THE POLITE HUM of dinner party conversation, Tom Buchanan, the handsome, wealthy cad at the heart of The...

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