History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 7, July

Britain and Russia 450 Years of Contact: Paul Dukes Looks at the Ups and Downs of the Relationship between the Land of the Lions and That of the Double-Headed Eagle
THE BEGINNINGS WERE accidental. In 1553, an expedition was sent from London under the Arctic navigator Sir Hugh Willoughby with the aim of finding the northeast passage to the Indies. An accompanying letter from Edward VI (r.1547-53) asked all those...
Britain and Russia. (Frontline)
ON MAY 10TH, 1553, IN THE FINAL WEEKS of the brief reign of Edward VI, Hugh Willoughby, gentleman, and Richard Chancellor, a sea captain, sailed north-east from London, bent on the 'Discovery of Regions, Dominions, Islands and Places unknown'. Willoughby...
Britons in Moscow in 1812: A.A. Orlove Looks at the Britons Who Stayed in Moscow When Napoleon Invaded, and Those Who Visited after the Destruction
ONE OF THE KEY EPISODES of the Great Patriotic War of 1812 is the capture by the French of Moscow and the destruction of the city by fire. It would appear that all the details of this event are well known. But one of the least researched elements is...
Daniel Defoe Put in the Pillory: July 29th/31st 1703. (Months Past)
AT THE END OF 1702 Daniel Defoe was in his early forties, a London dissenter born and bred, a married man with eight children, the owner of a brickworks in Tilbury and a government spin doctor, paid to write in praise of the administration's policies--an...
Edward Hull (D. 1453). (Commons Sense)
While much of Christendom was reeling at the shock news of the fail of Constantinople to the Turks in 1453, English attention were focused elsewhere. On July 18th, any hopes of retaining even part of the French empire acquired by Edward III and Henry...
Felipe Fernandez-Armesto: Daniel Snowman Meets the Historian of Columbus, Barcelona, the Millennium, Truth, Civilisations, Food and the Americas. (Cross Current)
FELIPE FERNANDEZ-ARMESTO'S PUBLISHED bibliography, if printed in its entirety, would take up half this article. Helpfully, many of his books have one-word titles. But the brevity of the titles often belies the immense ambition of the projects they...
Finish of the First Tour De France: July 19th, 1903. (Months Past)
PRODUCTS OF THE bicycling craze of the 1890s in France included an army regiment mounted on bicycles and numerous flourishing bicycle-connected businesses as well as a public appetite for races. Besides track events in 'velodromes', there were long-distance...
King Alfred and the Cult of St Edmund: Anna Chapman Considers What Lies Behind the Cult of an East Anglian King Killed by the Vikings in 869
IN FEBRUARY 3RD 1014, witnesses watched as a miracle took place in the town of Bury St Edmunds in Suffolk. They were joined by an imposing but unwelcome visitor: the new king, Swein Forkbeard the Dane, had arrived fresh from conquering England to pillage...
Lady Jane Grey Proclaimed Queen: July 10th, 1553. (Months Past)
THIN AND FRECKLED WITH sandy hair, and so short that she wore elevator shoes, Lady Jane Grey was Henry VIII's great-niece. She was born in the same month in 1537 as his son and successor, Edward VI, and her ambitious parents, hoping to marry her to...
Liberated from the Dead Hand ... Lev Anninskiy Describes His Encounters with Censored and Uncensored History in Soviet Russia. (Point of Departure)
I WAS ELEVEN years old in 1945 when the war ended, and my mother and I both gradually came to terms with the fact that my father would never return from the front line. In public we continued to wait, but inside ourselves we had said goodbye. A new...
Liverpool in the Blitz: Simon Jones Describes 'Spirit of the Blitz: Liverpool in the Second World War', a New Exhibition Created by National Museums Liverpool Which Opens at the Merseyside Maritime Museum on July 10th. (Frontline)
THAT LIVERPOOL EVEN HAD A Blitz will come as a surprise to many. Yet what Churchill described as 'the worst single incident of the war' occurred during an air raid on the city in November 1940. An explosion from a parachute mine caused the collapse...
Orwell and Burke: Strange Bedfellows? Gordon Marsden Sees an Identity of Outlook between Two Writers Generally Seen as Occupying Opposite Ends of the Political Spectrum in Britain. (Cross Current)
IN THE WELTER OF WORDS to mark the centenary of George Orwell's birth this summer, tributes will rightly be paid to the singularity which has made him one of our most important writers. But perhaps less commented upon will be the strange similarity...
Points of the Compass: Matthew Howells Introduces History Compass, a New Concept in History Publishing. (Frontline)
HISTORY COMPASS IS A NEW ONLINE RESOURCE that aims to solve the problem of keeping up with new developments in history by providing historians with regularly updated overviews of the important trends, debates, resources and publications in the field....
Red House: Denise Silvester-Carr Visits the House That Proved an Inspiration to Many in the Arts and Crafts Movement, and Which Opens to the Public on July 16th. (Frontline)
RED HOUSE, THE REMARKABLE RED-BRICK HOUSE built for William Morris in Bexleyheath, southeast London, was finally acquired by the National Trust in January. I say 'finally' as it was not the first time the Trust had tried to secure the house in which...
The Globalisation of Sport: Mike Cronin and Richard Holt, Discover the Roots of International Sport in France. (Sport & Society)
ON THE EVIDENCE OF THE 2002 World Cup in Japan and South Korea and the 2000 Sydney Olympics, it is easy to think there is a homogeneous world-wide sporting culture. Coca-Cola, MasterCard and other multi-national companies invest vast sums to capture...
The Roots of Reform: Patrick Dillon Identifies the Mid-18th Century as a Watershed in Ideas about Reforming Society. (Today's History)
IN 1754 THe REFORMER Jonas Hanway directed his attention towards child poverty in London. He did not just lament the malnourished infants in every doorway; he developed suggestions for how to feed them and give them work. Hanway was not one to pass...
The Schrippenfest Incident: Godfrey Hodgson Tells of a Little-Known Episode in Which an Unofficial American Diplomat Attempted to Redraw the Political Map in the Summer of 1914, Bringing Peace to Europe and Development to the Third World
LONG AFTER THE WAR was over, the deposed Kaiser Wilhelm II received a German-American journalist, George Sylvester Viereck, in his exile at Doorn in Holland. Viereck was surprised to hear him say that 'The visit of Colonel House to Berlin and London...