History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 44, No. 4, April

American Democracy through Ancient Greek Eyes
Its capital city and seat of government is dominated by classical style and pose, but would 'the land of the free' be congenial territory to democracy's ancient progenitors today? Batty Strauss ponders the contrasts and the surprising similarities....
Ancient Greeks and Modern Britons
Paul Cartledge has been responsible, as Consultant Editor to our Democracy series, for setting out parameters for a potentially endless examination, and in helping bring on board the impressively-broad band of international. contributors to it. Here...
Archaeology and the Right Snuff
* Archaeology these days has to fund its activities from diverse sources but one of the most unusual is that which this month is financing the excavation in Jersey of what may have been a fifteenth-century Breton farmhouse. The sale of part of a large...
Hollywood's Star Wars
* The last-minute crisis in the 1993 GATT talks, caused by fierce American attacks on the economic arrangements sustaining the French national film and television industries, should not have provoked the surprise it did in the international community....
Lauderdale's Reviving Tales
* Half way up Highgate Hill one of the most historically interesting houses in north London is in the final stages of restoration. Lauderdale House has an imposing name and a past stretching back nearly 400 years. Its confused architectural history...
Marriage and Motherhood in Ancient Egypt
We may all know about Nefertiti, but what was life like for the less-famous women of Ancient Egypt? Joyce Tyldesley describes in a piece adapted from her forthcoming book, the restraints and freedoms operating on daughters of Isis. Found your household...
Retro Berlin?
* Being a social art, architecture can hardly ever be separated from politics. Least of all on the palimpsest of the city of Berlin. The historical centre of Berlin is the area known as the Spreeinsel - an island formed by a division in the river Spree....
Spring Books
Our seasonal round-up of the latest history titles from the publishing world catering for the general reader and specialist alike. Europe - a broad sweep New titles focusing on Europe reflect the on-going debates about European Union, by looking...
The Cavendish Collection
* The delightful old town of King's Lynn has survived centuries of wind, weather and politics, and even the earnestly destructive efforts of its local authority to appease the everlasting motor car in the 1960s. On the Great Ouse in Norfolk's north-western...
The Devil and the Saints in the Conquest of Mexico
How did the polytheistic, human-sacrificing, pre-Cortes inhabitants of Mexico become devout sons and daughters of the church of the Catholic kings? Fernando Cervantes explores the conversion process and the fascinating continuities between new and...
Turner and Shakespeare's Jessica
Andrew Wilton discusses a picture that shows the great landscape painter in a role removed from his stereotype, and which tells us much about the changing mores and aspirations of 'Middlemarch' England. John Ruskin was fond of applying the epithet...
Walt Whitman's Different Lights
In the long line of American radicals - celebrated in a book published this spring by Routledge - the figure of Wait Whitman stands tall as writer, poetic free spirit and a nineteenth-century prefigurer of the Beat generation. But as Robert Martin...
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